Newcastle-under-Lyme (UK Parliament constituency)

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Newcastle-under-Lyme
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire
Outline map
Location of Staffordshire within England
CountyStaffordshire
Electorate68,692 (December 2010)[1]
Major settlementsNewcastle-under-Lyme, Keele and Audley
Current constituency
Created1885
Member of ParliamentTBD
Number of membersOne
1354–1885
Number of membersTwo
Type of constituencyBorough constituency
Overlaps
European Parliament constituencyWest Midlands

Newcastle-under-Lyme is a constituency[n 1] in north Staffordshire created in 1354 and represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament from 2001 to 2019 by Paul Farrelly of the Labour Party.[n 2] It was the last to be co-represented by a member of the Conservative Party when it was dual-member, before the 1885 general election which followed the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 coupled with the Reform Act 1884. In 1919 the local MP, Josiah Wedgwood, shifted his allegiance from the Liberal Party — the Lloyd George Coalition Liberals allying with the Conservatives — to the Labour Party and the seat has elected the Labour candidate who has stood since that date, a total of 29 elections in succession. Labour came close to losing the seat in 1969, 1986, 2015 and 2017.

Its 2017 general election result was the sixth-closest result, a winning margin of 30 votes.[2]

History[edit]

From its creation in 1354, Newcastle-under-Lyme returned two MPs to the House of Commons. Under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, the constituency's representation was cut to one member.

Prominent frontbenchers or members[edit]

Josiah Wedgwood of the pottery family was repeatedly elected to the seat from 1906 until he was ennobled to join the Lords in 1942, as 1st Baron Wedgwood and campaigned in the US for that country to join World War II and for Indian Independence; he was among many Liberals and their supporters deserting the party in or around 1918 due to the steering of David Lloyd George to the right and inviting Conservatives into government with him. Before the 20th century the constituency was often influenced and represented by members of the Leveson, Leveson-Gower[n 3] and related Egerton family who owned in this constituency the Trentham estate[n 4] - their most important MP was the Viscount Trentham who obtained a Dukedom.

Summary of results[edit]

This constituency had been a loyal Labour Party seat having returned a Labour MP in all 29 elections since 1918 and specifically since 1922 when MP Wedgwood defected from the highly centrist and compromising Liberal Party at the time to the Labour Party — his was among a great series of defections at this time see for example ex-Prime Minister H. H. Asquith's strong criticism of the Coalition Liberals particularly David Lloyd George. The 2015 result gave the seat the 9th-smallest majority of Labour's 232 seats by percentage of majority and 3rd-lowest in 2017.[3] The Conservatives took six seats from Labour in 2017, and this seat was the second closest to being taken that was held, behind Dudley North, where the result was a Labour majority of 22 votes.

Results of candidates of other parties[edit]

In 2015 one of four other parties' candidates standing, UKIP's Wood, won more than 5% of the vote in 2015 therefore keeping his deposit, the party which campaigned consistently for the public vote for leaving the European Union in 2016. In 2017 the three largest English parties fielded candidates only — Labour, Conservative and Liberal Democrat candidates in order of votes won.

Turnout since 1945[edit]

Turnout has ranged from 87.6% in 1950 to 58.8% in 2001.

Boundaries[edit]

The constituency includes most of the northerly parts of Newcastle-under-Lyme borough, primarily Newcastle-under-Lyme town plus Keele and Audley.

Parliament accepted the Boundary Commission's Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies for General Election 2010 since which it has electoral wards, with no alterations in that review:

From 1983-2010 the constituency comprised the following wards of the Borough of Newcastle-under-Lyme, namely, Audley and Bignall End, Bradwell, Chesterton, Clayton, Cross Heath, Halmerend, Holditch, Keele, May Bank, Porthill, Seabridge, Silverdale, Thistleberry, Town, Westlands and Wolstanton.

Members of Parliament[edit]

MPs 1353–1509[edit]

Where the name of the member has not yet been ascertained or is not recorded in a surviving document, the entry unknown is entered in the table.

Burgesses in the English Parliament 1510-1707[edit]

As there were sometimes significant gaps between Parliaments held in this period, the dates of first assembly and dissolution are given.

The Roman numerals after some names are those used in The House of Commons 1509-1558 and The House of Commons 1558-1603 to distinguish a member from another politician of the same name.

Elected Assembled Dissolved First member Second member
1510 21 January 1510 23 February 1510 John Welles William Pury
1512 4 February 1512 4 March 1514 John Welles Thomas Rider
1515 5 February 1515 22 December 1515 John Welles Thomas Rider
1523 15 April 1523 13 August 1523 unknown unknown
1529 3 November 1529 14 April 1536 John Persall Richard Grey
1536 8 June 1536 18 July 1536 unknown unknown
1539 28 April 1539 24 July 1540 unknown unknown
1542 16 January 1542 28 March 1544 Harry Broke John Smith
1545 23 November 1545 31 January 1547 Humphrey Welles Harry Broke
1547 4 November 1547 15 April 1552 James Rolston William Layton (died)
Alexander Walker in place of Layton
1553 1 March 1553 31 March 1553 Roger Fowke John Smyth
1553 5 October 1553 5 December 1553 Roger Fowke James Rolston
1554 2 April 1554 3 May 1554 James Rolleston Francis Moore
1554 12 November 1554 16 January 1555 Sir Ralph Bagnall Richard Smyth
1555 21 October 1555 9 December 1555 Sir Richard Bagnall (properly Sir Nicholas Bagenal) Richard Smyth
14 January 1558 20 January 1558 17 November 1558 Richard Hussey Thomas Egerton
5 January 1559 23 January 1559 8 May 1559 Sir Nicholas Bagenal Walter Blount
1562 or 1563 11 January 1563 2 January 1567 Sir Ralph Bagnall John Long
1571 2 April 1571 29 May 1571 Sir Ralph Bagnall Ralph Bourchier
12 April 1572 8 May 1572 19 April 1583 Ralph Bourchier Thomas Grimsdiche
16 November 1584 23 November 1584 14 September 1585 Peter Warburton Walter Chetwynd
28 September 1586 13 October 1586 23 March 1587 James Colyer Walter Chetwynd
10 October 1588 4 February 1589 29 March 1589 Thomas Humphrey Francis Angier
1593 18 February 1593 10 April 1593 John James Thomas Fitzherbert
16 October 1597 24 October 1597 9 February 1598 Sir Walter Leveson John Bowyer
1 October 1601 27 October 1601 19 December 1601 Edward Mainwaring Thomas Trentham
1603 [sic] 19 March 1604 9 February 1611 Sir Walter Chetwynd John Bowyer (replaced in by-election 1605 by Rowland Cotton)
1614 5 April 1614 7 June 1614 Edward Wymarke Robert Needham, 2nd Viscount Kilmorey
1621 16 January 1621 8 February 1622 Sir John Davies Edward Kerton
1624 12 February 1624 27 March 1625 Sir Edward Vere (disabled,
replaced April 1624 by Charles Glemham
Richard Leveson
1625 17 May 1625 12 August 1625 Edward Mainwaring John Keeling
1626 6 February 1626 15 June 1626 Sir John Skeffington John Keeling
1628 17 March 1628 10 March 1629 Sir George Gresley, 1st Baronet Sir Rowland Cotton
No parliament held
1640 13 April 1640 5 May 1640 Sir John Merrick (Country) Richard Lloyd (Court)
1640 3 November 1640 5 December 1648 Sir Richard Leveson (Royalist) (until 1643)
replaced by Samuel Terrick (Parl.)
Sir John Merrick (Parl.)
N/A 6 December 1648[n 5] 20 April 1653[n 6] unrepresented
N/A[n 7] 4 July 1653 12 December 1653 unrepresented
1654[n 8] 3 September 1654 22 January 1655 Edward Keeling
1656[n 9] 17 September 1656 4 February 1658 John Bowyer(never sat)
1659 27 January 1659 22 April 1659 Edward Keeling Tobias Bridge
N/A[n 10] 7 May 1659 20 February 1660 unknown unknown

MPs 1660–1885[edit]

Election 1st Member[6] 1st Party 2nd Member[6] 2nd Party
1660 John Bowyer Samuel Terrick
1661 Sir Caesar Colclough Edward Mainwaring
1675 William Leveson-Gower
1679 Sir Thomas Bellot, Bt
1685 Edward Mainwaring William Sneyd
1689 Sir William Leveson-Gower John Lawton
1690 Sir Thomas Bellot, Bt
1692 Sir John Leveson-Gower, later 1st Lord Gower
1695 John Lawton
1698 Sir Thomas Bellot, Bt
1699 Rowland Cotton Tory
1702 John Crewe Offley
1705[n 11] Sir Thomas Bellot, Bt Tory
1706 Crewe Offley John Lawton
1708 Sir Thomas Bellot, 3rd Baronet Tory Rowland Cotton Tory
1709 Crewe Offley Whig John Lawton
1710 William Burslem Rowland Cotton Tory
Jan 1715 Henry Vernon
1715 Sir Brian Broughton Crewe Offley Whig
1722 Thomas Leveson-Gower
1724 by-election Sir Walter Bagot
1727 Baptist Leveson-Gower John Ward
1734 John Lawton II
1740 by-election Randle Wilbraham
1747 Viscount Parker
1754 John Waldegrave
1761 Henry Vernon II
1762 by-election Sir Lawrence Dundas, Bt
1763 by-election Thomas Gilbert
Mar 1768 John Wrottesley, later 8th Bt Alexander Forrester
May 1768 by-election Sir George Hay
1774 George Waldegrave, Viscount Chewton
1779 by-election George Leveson-Gower, Viscount Trentham
1780 Sir Archibald Macdonald
1784 Richard Vernon
1790 John Leveson-Gower
1792 by-election William Egerton
1793 by-election Sir Francis Ford
1796 Edward Bootle-Wilbraham
1802 Sir Robert Lawley
1806 James Macdonald
1812 Earl Gower Whig[7] Sir John Boughey, Bt Whig[7]
1815 by-election Sir John Chetwode Tory[7]
1818 William Shepherd Kinnersley Tory[7] Robert Wilmot-Horton Whig[7]
1823 by-election Evelyn Denison Whig
1826 Richardson Borradaile Tory[7]
1830 William Henry Miller Whig[7]
1831 Edmund Peel Tory[7] Tory[7]
1832 Sir Henry Willoughby Tory[7]
1834 Conservative[7] Conservative[7]
1835 Edmund Peel Conservative[7]
1837 Spencer Horsey de Horsey Conservative[7]
1841 Edmund Buckley Conservative[7] John Quincey Harris Whig[7][8][9]
1842 by-election John Campbell Colquhoun Conservative[7]
1847 Samuel Christy Peelite[10][11] William Jackson Whig
1859 William Murray Conservative Liberal
1865 William Shepherd Allen Liberal Sir Edmund Buckley, Bt Conservative
1878 by-election Samuel Rathbone Edge Liberal
1880 Charles Donaldson-Hudson Conservative
1885 representation reduced to one member by the Redistribution of Seats Act

MPs since 1885[edit]

Year Member[6] Party
1885 William Shepherd Allen Liberal
1886 Douglas Coghill Liberal Unionist
1892 William Allen Liberal
1900 Sir Alfred Seale Haslam Liberal Unionist
1906 Josiah Wedgwood Liberal
1919 Labour
1942 by-election John Mack Labour
1951 Stephen Swingler Labour
1969 by-election John Golding Labour
1986 by-election Llin Golding Labour
2001 Paul Farrelly Labour

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

Candidates listed in alphabetical order of surname.

United Kingdom general election, 2019: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Aaron Bell [12][13]
Labour Carl Greatbatch [14]
Liberal Democrat Nigel Jones[15]
General election 2017: Newcastle-under-Lyme[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Paul Farrelly 21,124 48.2 Increase 9.8
Conservative Owen Meredith 21,094 48.1 Increase 11.2
Liberal Democrat Nigel Jones 1,624 3.8 Decrease 0.5
Majority 30 0.1 Decrease 1.4
Turnout 43,842 66.9 Increase 4.3
Labour hold Swing Decrease 0.7
General election 2015: Newcastle-under-Lyme[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Paul Farrelly 16,520 38.4 Increase 0.5
Conservative Tony Cox 15,870 36.9 Increase 2.5
UKIP Phil Wood 7,252 16.9 Increase 8.8
Liberal Democrat Ian Wilkes 1,826 4.2 Decrease 15.4
Green Sam Gibbons 1,246 2.9 Increase 2.9
Independent David Nixon 283 0.7 Increase 0.7
Majority 650 1.5 Decrease 2.1
Turnout 42,997 62.6 Increase 0.4
Labour hold Swing Decrease 1.5
General election 2010: Newcastle-under-Lyme[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Paul Farrelly 16,393 38.0 Decrease 7.4
Conservative Robert Jenrick 14,841 34.4 Increase 9.4
Liberal Democrat Nigel Jones 8,466 19.6 Increase 0.7
UKIP David Nixon 3,491 8.1 Increase 4.5
Majority 1,552 3.6 Decrease 16.8
Turnout 43,191 62.2 Increase 4.0
Labour hold Swing Decrease 8.4

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General election 2005: Newcastle-under-Lyme[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Paul Farrelly 18,053 45.4 - 8.0
Conservative Jeremy Lefroy 9,945 25.0 - 2.6
Liberal Democrat Trevor Johnson 7,528 18.9 + 3.4
UKIP David Nixon 1,436 3.6 + 2.1
BNP John Dawson 1,390 3.5 N/A
Green Andrew Dobson 918 2.3 N/A
Veritas Marian Harvey-Lover 518 1.3 N/A
Majority 8,108 20.4 - 5.4
Turnout 39,788 61.6 + 2.8
Labour hold Swing - 2.7
General election 2001: Newcastle-under-Lyme[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Paul Farrelly 20,650 53.4 - 3.1
Conservative Michael Flynn 10,664 27.6 + 6.1
Liberal Democrat Jerry Roodhouse 5,993 15.5 + 1.5
Independent Robert Fyson 773 2.0 N/A
UKIP Paul Godfrey 594 1.5 N/A
Majority 9,986 25.8 - 9.2
Turnout 38,674 58.8 - 14.8
Labour hold Swing - 4.6

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General election 1997: Newcastle-under-Lyme[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Llin Golding 27,743 56.5 + 8.6
Conservative Marcus Hayes 10,537 21.5 - 8.1
Liberal Democrat Robin Studd 6,858 14.0 - 7.9
Referendum Kim Suttle 1,510 3.1 N/A
Liberal Steven Mountford 1,399 2.9 N/A
Socialist Labour Bridget Bell 1,082 2.2 N/A
Majority 17,206 35.0 + 16.6
Turnout 49,129 73.6 - 7.2
Labour hold Swing
General election 1992: Newcastle-under-Lyme[22][23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Llin Golding 25,652 47.9 + 7.4
Conservative Andrew Brierley 15,813 29.6 + 1.7
Liberal Democrat Alan Thomas 11,727 21.9 - 9.0
Natural Law Richard Lines 314 0.6 N/A
Majority 9,839 18.4 + 8.8
Turnout 53,506 80.8 + 3.7
Labour hold Swing + 2.9

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General election 1987: Newcastle-under-Lyme[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Llin Golding 21,618 40.51 - 1.5
Liberal Alan Thomas 16,486 30.9 + 9.3
Conservative Peter Ridway 14,863 27.9 - 8.6
Ex Labour Moderate Michael Nicklin 397 0.7
Majority 5,132 9.6 + 4.1
Turnout 80.8
Labour hold Swing
1986 Newcastle-under-Lyme by-election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Llin Golding 16,819 40.8 - 1.2
Liberal Alan Thomas 16,020 38.8 + 17.2
Conservative James Nock 7,863 19.0 - 17.4
Monster Raving Loony David Sutch 277 0.7 N/A
Independent John Gaskell 115 0.3 N/A
Independent James Parker 83 0.2 N/A
Independent David Brewster 70 0.2 N/A
Majority 799 2.0 - 3.6
Turnout 41,247 62.2 - 15.1
Labour hold Swing
Registered electors 66,353
General election 1983: Newcastle-under-Lyme[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Golding 21,210 42.0
Conservative L Lawrence 18,406 36.4
Liberal Alan Thomas 10,916 21.6
Majority 2,804 5.6
Turnout 77.3
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General election 1979: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Golding 28,649 48.5
Conservative E Ashley 24,421 41.3
Liberal G Evans 5,878 10.0
British Socialist Empire S Rowe 156 0.3
Majority 4,228 7.2
Turnout 81.6
Labour hold Swing
General election October 1974: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Golding 28,154 49.6
Conservative Nicholas Bonsor 20,784 36.6
Liberal R Fyson 7,604 13.4
UK Front S Rowe 256 0.5
Majority 7,370 13.0
Turnout 78.0
Labour hold Swing
General election February 1974: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Golding 28,603 47.2
Conservative Nicholas Bonsor 22,955 37.9
Liberal R Fyson 8,861 14.6
UK Front S Rowe 228 0.4
Majority 5,648 9.3
Turnout 84.1
Labour hold Swing
General election 1970: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Golding 22,329 48.9 - 12.9
Conservative Nicholas Winterton 20,223 44.3 + 6.1
Liberal Derek Wright 1,954 4.3 N/A
Democratic Party Peter Boyle 1,194 2.61 N/A
Majority 2,106 4.6 - 19.0
Turnout 65.5
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

By-election 1969: Newcastle-under-Lyme[26][27]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Golding 21,786 46.1 - 15.7
Conservative Nicholas Winterton 20,744 43.9 + 5.7
Liberal David Spreckley 2,999 6.4 + 6.4
Democratic Party D Parker 1,699 3.6 + 3.6
Majority 1,042 2.2 - 21.4
Turnout 47,228 72.3
Labour hold Swing
General election 1966: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Stephen Swingler 31,548 61.8
Conservative Peggy Fenner 19,497 38.2
Majority 12,051 23.6
Turnout 79.9
Labour hold Swing
General election 1964: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Stephen Swingler 30,470 58.0
Conservative John Lovering 22,073 42.0
Majority 8,397 16.0
Turnout 82.2
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General election 1959: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Stephen Swingler 29,840 55.6
Conservative Thomas Prendergast 23,838 44.4
Majority 6,002 11.2
Turnout 84.4
Labour hold Swing
General election 1955: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Stephen Swingler 28,314 56.8
Conservative Frank Taylor 21,569 43.2
Majority 6,745 13.5
Turnout 80.8
Labour hold Swing
General election 1951: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Stephen Swingler 30,814 58.0
Conservative James Friend 22,278 42.0
Majority 8,536 16.1
Turnout 87.5
Labour hold Swing
General election 1950: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Mack 30,249 57.8
Conservative James Friend 22,132 42.2
Majority 8,117 15.5
Turnout 87.6
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General election 1945: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Mack 25,903 66.2
Conservative George Wade 8,380 21.4
Liberal Norman Elliott 4,838 12.4
Majority 17,523 44.8
Turnout 77.1
Labour hold Swing
1942 Newcastle under Lyme by-election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Mack Unopposed
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

General election 1935: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Josiah Wedgwood Unopposed
Labour gain from Independent Labour Swing
Wedgwood
General election 1931: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Labour Josiah Wedgwood Unopposed N/A N/A
Independent Labour gain from Labour Swing N/A

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General election 1929: Newcastle-under-Lyme[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Josiah Wedgwood 20,931 69.9 +12.2
Unionist Christopher Kemplay Tatham 9,011 30.1 −12.2
Majority 11,920 39.8 +24.4
Turnout 29,942 75.8 −4.2
Registered electors 39,482
Labour hold Swing +12.2
General election 1924: Newcastle-under-Lyme[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Josiah Wedgwood 14,226 57.7 −7.9
Unionist A. Hassam 10,425 42.3 +7.9
Majority 3,801 15.4 −15.8
Turnout 24,651 80.0 +15.8
Registered electors 30,816
Labour hold Swing −7.9
General election 1923: Newcastle-under-Lyme
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Josiah Wedgwood 12,881 65.6 +5.4
Unionist John Ravenshaw 6,746 34.4 N/A
Majority 6,135 31.2 +10.8
Turnout 19,627 64.2 −15.3
Registered electors 30,565
Labour hold Swing N/A
General election 1922: Newcastle-under-Lyme[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Josiah Wedgwood 14,503 60.2 N/A
National Liberal Albert Shaw 9,573 39.8 N/A
Majority 4,930 20.4 N/A
Turnout 24,076 79.5 N/A
Registered electors 30,300
Labour gain from Independent Liberal Swing N/A

Election results 1868-1918[edit]

Elections in the 1860s[edit]

Allen
General election 1868: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats)[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Edmund Buckley 1,423 43.8 +1.9
Liberal William Shepherd Allen 1,081 33.3 −10.8
Liberal Henry Thomas Salmon[30] 744 22.9 +8.8
Majority 342 10.5 −17.3
Turnout 2,340 (est) 82.0 (est) −12.2
Registered electors 2,849
Conservative hold Swing +2.0
Liberal hold Swing −6.4

Elections in the 1870s[edit]

General election 1874: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats) [29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Edmund Buckley 1,173 35.3 +13.4
Liberal William Shepherd Allen 1,116 33.6 −22.6
Conservative Harry Davenport 1,037 31.2 +9.3
Turnout 2,221 (est) 74.1 (est) −7.9
Registered electors 2,999
Majority 57 1.7 +8.8
Conservative hold Swing +12.4
Majority 79 2.4 N/A
Liberal hold Swing −22.7

Buckley resigned, causing a by-election.

1878 Newcastle-under-Lyme by-election (1 seat) [29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Samuel Rathbone Edge 1,330 57.3 +23.7
Conservative Charles Donaldson-Hudson 990 42.7 -23.8
Majority 340 14.7 +12.3
Turnout 2,320 68.3 -5.8
Registered electors 3,396
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +23.8

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

General election 1880: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats) [29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Donaldson-Hudson 1,484 37.9 −28.6
Liberal William Shepherd Allen 1,252 32.0 +15.2
Liberal Samuel Rathbone Edge 1,175 30.0 +13.2
Majority 232 5.9 +4.2
Turnout 2,736 (est) 84.6 (est) +10.5
Registered electors 3,235
Conservative hold Swing −13.8
Liberal hold Swing +14.8
Scoble
General election 1885: Newcastle-under-Lyme (1 seat)[31][32][33]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal William Shepherd Allen 4,031 58.6 −3.4
Conservative Andrew Scoble 2,848 41.4 +3.5
Majority 1,183 17.2 N/A
Turnout 6,879 87.8 +3.2 (est)
Registered electors 7,837
Liberal hold Swing +3.5
Coghill
General election 1886: Newcastle-under-Lyme[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Unionist Douglas Coghill 2,896 51.3 +9.9
Liberal John Beavis Brindley 2,752 48.7 -9.9
Majority 144 2.6 N/A
Turnout 5,648 72.1 -15.7
Registered electors 7,837
Liberal Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +9.9

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

Allen
General election 1892: Newcastle-under-Lyme[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal William Allen 4,024 57.8 +9.1
Liberal Unionist Douglas Coghill 2,936 42.2 −9.1
Majority 1,088 15.6 N/A
Turnout 6,960 78.5 +6.4
Registered electors 8,862
Liberal gain from Liberal Unionist Swing +9.1
General election 1895: Newcastle-under-Lyme[31][32][34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal William Allen 3,510 50.8 −7.0
Liberal Unionist Arthur Morier Lee 3,399 49.2 +7.0
Majority 111 1.6 −14.0
Turnout 6,909 83.4 +4.9
Registered electors 8,281
Liberal hold Swing −7.0

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

Haslam
General election 1900: Newcastle-under-Lyme[31][32][34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Unionist Alfred Seale Haslam 3,750 51.2 +2.0
Liberal William Allen 3,568 48.8 −2.0
Majority 182 2.4 N/A
Turnout 7,318 80.5 −2.9
Registered electors 9,095
Liberal Unionist gain from Liberal Swing + 2.0
General election 1906: Newcastle-under-Lyme[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Josiah Wedgwood 5,155 63.6 +14.8
Liberal Unionist Alfred Seale Haslam 2,948 36.4 -14.8
Majority 2,207 27.2 N/A
Turnout 8,103 84.0 +3.5
Registered electors 9,650
Liberal gain from Liberal Unionist Swing +14.8

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

Wedgwood
General election January 1910: Newcastle-under-Lyme[31][35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Josiah Wedgwood 5,613 56.9 - 6.7
Liberal Unionist Ewart Grogan 4,245 43.1 + 6.7
Majority 1,368 13.8 - 13.4
Turnout 93.8 + 9.8
Liberal hold Swing - 6.7
General election December 1910: Newcastle-under-Lyme[31][35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Josiah Wedgwood 5,281 56.4 - 0.5
Liberal Unionist Ewart Grogan 4,087 43.6 + 0.5
Majority 1,194 12.8 - 1.0
Turnout 89.1 - 4.7
Liberal hold Swing - 0.5

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

General election 1918: Newcastle-under-Lyme[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Liberal Josiah Wedgwood* Unopposed
Independent Liberal gain from Liberal

* Wedgwood was issued with a Coalition Coupon but did not accept it. He was also adopted by the local Liberal association, but considered himself an independent candidate.

Election results 1832-1868[edit]

Elections in the 1840s[edit]

General election 1841: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats)[7][29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Edmund Buckley 721 42.3
Whig John Quincey Harris 565 33.2
Conservative William Henry Miller 417 24.5
Turnout 977 94.1
Registered electors 1,090
Majority 156 9.2
Conservative hold Swing
Majority 148 8.7 N/A
Whig gain from Conservative Swing

Harris' election was declared void on petition on 11 May 1842, due to bribery by his agent, causing a by-election.[36]

By-election, 14 June 1842: Newcastle-under-Lyme[7][29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Quincey Harris 499 51.0 +17.8
Conservative John Campbell Colquhoun 479 49.0 −17.8
Majority 20 2.0 −6.7
Turnout 978 91.0 −3.1
Registered electors 1,075
Whig hold Swing +17.8

Harris' election was again declared void on 23 July 1842, due to bribery by his agents, and Colquhoun was declared elected in his place.[37]

General election 1847: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats)[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Peelite Samuel Christy 571 32.5 N/A
Whig William Jackson 565 32.1 +15.5
Conservative Francis Egerton 522 29.7 −37.1
Whig William Greig[38] 101 5.7 −10.9
Turnout 880 (est) 81.9 (est) −12.2
Registered electors 1,074
Majority 6 0.3 N/A
Peelite gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Majority 43 2.4 −6.3
Whig hold Swing +17.0

Christy resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds due to holding a government contract,[39] causing a by-election in which he stood.

By-election, 15 December 1847: Newcastle-under-Lyme[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Peelite Samuel Christy 546 59.8 +27.3
Whig Thomas Ross 367 40.2 +3.6
Majority 179 19.6 +19.3
Turnout 913 85.0 +3.1
Registered electors 1,074
Peelite hold Swing +11.9

Elections in the 1850s[edit]

General election 1852: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats)[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig William Jackson 622 42.6 +10.5
Peelite Samuel Christy 585 40.1 +7.6
Whig Thomas Ross[40][41] 252 17.3 +11.6
Turnout 730 (est) 66.9 (est) −15.0
Registered electors 1,090
Majority 37 2.5 +0.1
Whig hold Swing +3.4
Majority 333 22.8 +22.5
Peelite hold Swing −14.9
General election 1857: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats)[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Peelite Samuel Christy 654 55.4 +15.3
Whig William Jackson 413 35.0 −7.6
Independent Liberal John Riley[42][43] 113 9.6 N/A
Majority 241 20.4 −2.4
Turnout 590 (est) 59.2 (est) −7.7
Registered electors 997
Peelite hold Swing +11.5
Whig hold Swing −11.5
General election 1859: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats)[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Murray Unopposed
Liberal William Jackson Unopposed
Registered electors 994
Conservative gain from Peelite
Liberal hold

Elections in the 1860s[edit]

General election 1865: Newcastle-under-Lyme (2 seats)[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal William Shepherd Allen 520 44.1 N/A
Conservative Edmund Buckley 494 41.9 N/A
Liberal John Ashford Wise[44] 166 14.1 N/A
Turnout 1,014 (est) 94.2 (est) N/A
Registered electors 1,077
Majority 26 2.2 N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Majority 328 27.8 N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. ^ Usually e.g. H. D. G. Leveson-Gower, Granville George Leveson-Gower
  4. ^ A series of marriages to heiresses by members of the Leveson-Gower family made the Dukes of Sutherland one of the richest landowning families in the Britain, they also owned Dunrobin Castle, Lancaster House as Stafford House and Stetchworth House.
  5. ^ Date of Pride's Purge, which converted the Long Parliament into the Rump Parliament
  6. ^ Date when Oliver Cromwell dissolved the Rump Parliament by force.
  7. ^ Date when the members of the nominated or Barebones Parliament were selected at a "Convention". The parliamentary borough of Newcastle under Lyme was not represented in this body.
  8. ^ Date when the members of the First Protectorate Parliament were elected. The parliamentary borough was represented in this body.
  9. ^ Date when the members of the Second Protectorate Parliament were elected. The parliamentary borough was entitled to be represented in this body.
  10. ^ The Rump Parliament was recalled and subsequently Pride's Purge was reversed, allowing the full Long Parliament to meet until it agreed to dissolve itself.
  11. ^ The MPs of the last Parliament of England and 45 members co-opted from the former Parliament of Scotland, became the House of Commons of the 1st Parliament of Great Britain which assembled on 23 October 1707 (see below for the members in that Parliament).
References
  1. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. ^ "GE2017: Marginal seats and turnout". 23 June 2017.
  3. ^ List of Labour MPs elected in 2015 by % majority UK Political.info. Retrieved 2017-01-29
  4. ^ 2010 post-revision map non-metropolitan areas and unitary authorities of England
  5. ^ "Tamworth Parliamentary Borough 1275-1832". The Staffordshire Encyclopaedia. Retrieved 26 October 2010.
  6. ^ a b c Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "N" (part 1)
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. pp. 43–45. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via Google Books.
  8. ^ "Country Elections". Bell's Weekly Messenger. 5 July 1841. pp. 3–4. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. ^ "District News". Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser. 3 July 1841. pp. 2–3. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ Morton, Edward, ed. (1854). The Parliamentary Handbook: Comprising a Pocket Peerage and Parliamentary Companion (Third ed.). London: Henry Adams. p. 220. Retrieved 7 June 2018.
  11. ^ "Staffordshire Advertiser". 17 July 1847. p. 5. Retrieved 7 June 2018.
  12. ^ https://www.conservativehome.com/parliament/2019/10/conservatives-select-13-new-candidates-as-election-preparation-gathers-pace.html
  13. ^ https://www.facebook.com/1066746233429286/posts/2078372495599983?sfns=mo
  14. ^ https://mobile.twitter.com/carlgreatbatch?lang=en
  15. ^ "Liberal Democrat Parliamentary Candidates". Mark Pack. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  16. ^ "Owen Meredith".
  17. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  18. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  19. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  20. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  21. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  22. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  23. ^ "UK General Election results April 1992". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  24. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  25. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  26. ^ GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS SINCE 1966, accessed 27 October 2008
  27. ^ UK Election Statistics: 1918-2004 RESEARCH PAPER 04/61 28 JULY 2004 Archived 14 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine, accessed 27 October 2008
  28. ^ a b c d British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, FWS Craig
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  30. ^ "Newcastle-under-Lyme". Birmingham Daily Gazette. 17 November 1868. p. 8. Retrieved 6 March 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h British Parliamentary Election Results 1885-1918, FWS Craig
  32. ^ a b c d e f The Liberal Year Book, 1907
  33. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1886
  34. ^ a b Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  35. ^ a b Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916
  36. ^ "Imperial Parliament". Northampton Mercury. 14 May 1842. pp. 1–2. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  37. ^ "New Case of Disqualification of Members". Morning Chronicle. 26 July 1842. p. 3. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  38. ^ "Borough of Newcastle". Staffordshire Advertiser. 17 July 1847. p. 4. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  39. ^ "Newcastle-under-Lyme". Worcestershire Chronicle. 22 December 1847. p. 7. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  40. ^ "Elections". Monmouthshire Beacon. 18 December 1847. p. 3. Retrieved 7 June 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  41. ^ "Borough of Newcastle-under-Lyme". Staffordshire Advertiser. 10 July 1852. p. 3. Retrieved 7 June 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  42. ^ "Newcastle". Staffordshire Advertiser. 28 March 1857. p. 8. Retrieved 7 June 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  43. ^ "Local Election Intelligence". Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser. 25 March 1857. p. 4. Retrieved 7 June 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  44. ^ "Election Intelligence". Leeds Intelligencer. 13 July 1865. p. 4. Retrieved 6 March 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.

Sources[edit]

Coordinates: 53°02′N 2°18′W / 53.04°N 2.30°W / 53.04; -2.30