List of SES satellites

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This is a list of satellites operated by SES S.A.

AMC fleet[edit]

The AMC fleet was originally operated by GE Americom, acquired by SES Global in 2001. Americom was also operating the older Satcom fleet, whose last operating spacecraft were fully retired in the early 2000s.

Satellite Location Manufacturer Model Coverage Launch date Launch vehicle Comments

Active fleet[edit]

AMC-4 101°W Lockheed Martin A2100AX 24 C-band, 20 watt
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America)
24+4 Ku-band, 110 watt
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America)
November 13, 1999 Ariane 44LP [citation needed]
AMC-6 72°W Lockheed Martin A2100AX 24 C-band, 20 watt
(CONUS, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America)
24+4 Ku-band, 110 watt
(CONUS, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America)
October 22, 2000 Proton-K/DM-2 [citation needed]
AMC-8 139°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 20 watt
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
December 19, 2000 Ariane 5G [citation needed]
AMC-10 135°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 20 watt
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
February 5, 2004 Atlas IIAS[1]
AMC-11 131°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 20 watt
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
May 19, 2004 Atlas IIAS[2]
AMC-15 105°W Lockheed Martin A2100AX 24 Ku-band,
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
12 Ka-band,
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
October 15, 2004 Proton-M/Briz-M[3]
AMC-16 85°W Lockheed Martin A2100AX 24 Ku-band,
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
12 Ka-band,
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
December 17, 2004 Atlas V (521)[4]
AMC-18 105°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 20 watt
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
December 8, 2006 Ariane 5-ECA[5] Replaced AMC-2 previously at 105°W
AMC-21 125°W Thales Alenia Space /
Orbital Sciences
STAR-2 24 Ku-band, 110 watt
(USA, Southern Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
August 14, 2008 Ariane 5-ECA[6]

Backup fleet[edit]

AMC-7 135°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 20 watt
(USA, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean)
September 14, 2000 Ariane 5G Backup to AMC-10[7]

Retired satellites[edit]

AMC-1 103°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 12–14 watt
(USA, Mexico, Caribbean, Canada)
24 Ku-band, 60watt
(USA, Southern Canada, Northern Mexico)
September 8, 1996 Atlas IIA [citation needed]
AMC-2 101°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 12–18 watt
(USA, Mexico, Canada)
24 Ku-band, 60watt
(CONUS, Northern Mexico, Canada)
January 30, 1997 Ariane 44L co-located with AMC-4[citation needed]
AMC-3 87°W Lockheed Martin A2100A 24 C-band, 12–18 watt
(USA, Mexico, Canada, Caribbean)
24 Ku-band, 60watt
(USA, Mexico, Canada, Caribbean)
September 4, 1997 Atlas IIAS [citation needed]
AMC-5 79°W Alcatel Space Spacebus 2000 16 Ku-band, 55 watt
(CONUS, South Canada, Northern Mexico)
October 28, 1998 Ariane 44L Retired in May 2014[8]
AMC-9 83°W Alcatel Space Spacebus 3000B3 24 C-band, 20 watt
(CONUS, Canada, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America)
24 Ku-band, 110watt
(CONUS, Mexico)
June 7, 2003 Proton-K/Briz-M[9] Anomaly on-orbit, satellite lost control and appeared to be breaking apart.[10]

Launch failures[edit]

AMC-14 61.5°W Lockheed Martin A2100 32 Ku-band, 150 watt March 14, 2008 Proton-M/Briz-M Wrong orbit[11]

Astra fleet[edit]

There are 16 operational Astra satellites, the majority in five orbital locations - Astra 19.2°E, Astra 28.2°E, Astra 23.5°E, Astra 5°E, Astra 31.5°E. Astra's principle of "co-location" (several satellites are maintained close to each other, all within a cube with a size of 150 km[12]) increases flexibility and redundancy.

Satellite Launch Date Manufacturer Model Launch vehicle Comments
ASTRA 19.2°E Broadcasts 900 channels (511 SD, 382 HD, 7 UHD) to 116 million households[13]
1KR April 20, 2006 Lockheed Martin A2100 Atlas V (411) Launched after the failure of Astra 1K. Broadcast 28 transponders.
1L May 4, 2007 Lockheed Martin A2100 Ariane 5 ECA Replacement for 1E/2C; Ku and Ka bands. Broadcast 30 transponders and 14 transponder on Ka band
1M November 6, 2008 Astrium (now Airbus D&S) Eurostar E3000 Proton-M Replacement for 1G and backup at 19.2°E. Started commercial service 20 January 2009[14] Broadcast 28 transponders.
1N August 6, 2011 Astrium (now Airbus D&S) Eurostar E3000 Ariane 5 ECA Started commercial service October 24, 2011[15] Broadcast 34 transponders.
ASTRA 28.2°E Broadcasts 452 channels (367 SD, 84 HD, 1 UHD) to 49 million households[13]
2E September 30, 2013[16] Astrium (now Airbus D&S) Eurostar E3000 Proton Breeze M Started commercial service on February 1, 2014[17] Broadcast 20 transponders on UK spot beam and 26 transponders on European beam.
2F September 28, 2012[18] Astrium (now Airbus D&S) Eurostar E3000 Ariane 5 ECA Rolling capacity replacement at 28.2°E[19] and provision of Ku-band DTH in West Africa and Ka-band in western Europe[20] Started commercial service on November 21, 2012.[21] Broadcast 6 transponders on UK spot beam, 26 transponders on European beam 3 transponders on West Africa spot beam and 1 transponder on Middle East spot beam.
2G December 27, 2014[22] Airbus D&S Eurostar E3000 Proton Breeze M Rolling capacity replacement at 28.2°E[19] Tested at 21.0°E and 43.5°E before moving to 28.2°E in June 2015[23] Started commercial service on June 1, 2015. Broadcast 7 transponders on UK spot beam and 17 transponders on European beam.
ASTRA 23.5°E Broadcasts 243 channels (132 SD, 110 HD, 1 UHD) to 35 million households[13]
3B May 21, 2010 Astrium (now Airbus D&S) Eurostar E3000 Ariane 5 ECA Launch delayed for nearly two months due to launcher problems.[24]
ASTRA 5°E Broadcasts to 51.6 million households[13]
4A November 18, 2007 Lockheed Martin A2100AX Proton-M Originally called Sirius 4
4B (now SES-5) July 10, 2012 Space Systems/Loral LS-1300 Proton-M Originally Sirius 5, renamed to Astra 4B in 2010 and to SES-5 in 2011. Provides global C-band capacity and Ku-band for Sub-Saharan Africa and Nordic regions.
ASTRA 31.5°E Broadcasts 258 channels (204 SD, 54 HD) to 14 million households[13]
5B March 22, 2014[25] Airbus D&S Eurostar E3000 Ariane 5 ECA To add new capacity and replace existing craft at 31.5°E[19] Entered commercial service on June 2, 2014[25]
NOT IN REGULAR USE
1D November 1, 1994 Hughes HS-601 Ariane 42P Positioned at 73°W
Originally at 19.2°E. Used at 28.2°E, 23.5°E, 31.5°E, 1.8°E and 52.2°E. Started moving west in February 2014 to arrive at 67.5°W in June 2014.[26] In summer 2015 moved to 47.2°W, near SES' NSS806[27] In 2017 moved to 73°W.[28]
1F April 8, 1996 Hughes HS-601 Proton-K Positioned at 44.5°E
Originally launched to 19.2°E. Moved in August 2009 to 51°E. Moved in May 2010 to 55°E.Moved in March 2015 to 44.5°E.[29]
1G December 2, 1997 Hughes HS-601HP Proton-K Positioned at 57°E
Power problems, now max 20 transponders. Originally launched to 19.2°E. Moved to 23.5°E February 2009 following launch of Astra 1M. Then to 31.5°E (July 2010) following launch of Astra 3B. Moved east in summer 2014 to 60°E, then to 63°E in November 2016,[30] to 51°E in August 2017[31] and to 57°E in August 2018.[32]
1H June 18, 1999 Hughes HS-601HP Proton Positioned at 81°W
Originally launched to 19.2°E. Moved in June 2013 to 52.2°E[33] to establish SES' commercialization of the MonacoSat position.[34] Returned in 2014 to 19.2°E.[35] Started moving west in May 2014 arriving at 67.5°W in mid-August 2014.[36] Moved in May 2015 to 47.5°W,[37] in September 2016 to 55.2°E[38], in January 2017 to 43.5°E[39] and in February 2018 to 67°W.[28] In October 2018 Astra 1H was positioned at 81°W.[40]
2A August 30, 1998 Hughes HS-601HP Proton Positioned at 100°E
Originally launched to 28.2°E. Inactive at 28.2°E from March 2015. Moved to 113.5°E in summer 2016[41] and to 100°E in August 2018.[42]
2B September 14, 2000 Astrium (now Airbus D&S) Eurostar E2000+ Ariane 5G Positioned at 19.2°E
Originally launched to 28.2°E. Relocated to 19.2°E in February 2013 [43] following launch of Astra 2F to 28.2°E. Moved to 31.5°E in February 2014. Returned to 19.2°E as backup in December 2016.[44] Started moving west in June 2017 to arrive alongside NSS-7 at 20°W in August 2017.[45] Started moving east in April 2018 to arrive at Astra 19.2°E in July 2018.[46]
2C June 16, 2001 Hughes HS-601HP Proton Positioned at 23.5°E
Initially deployed at 19.2°E pending launch of 1L, then at originally intended position of 28.2°E. Moved to 31.5°E (May 2009) to temporarily replace the failed Astra 5A, then back to 19.2°E (September 2010). Returned to 28.2°E (April 2014) and then in August 2015 moved to 60.5°E.[47] In April 2018 it moved west arriving at 23.5°E in May 2018.[48]
2D December 19, 2000 Hughes HS-376HP Ariane 5G Positioned at 5°E
Originally launched to 28.2°E. Ceased regular use in February 2013 and positioned, inactive, at 28.0°E[49] until June 2015. Then moved west to be stationed at Astra 5°E in July 2015.[50] In October 2015 moved to 57°E.[51] In December 2017 moved to 60°E.[52] Started moving west at 0.65°/day in May 2018 to arrive at Astra 5°E in July 2018.[53]
3A March 29, 2002 Boeing HS-376HP Ariane 4L Positioned at 47°W
Originally launched to 23.5°E. Moved to 177°W in November 2013, unused and in inclined orbit alongside NSS 9.[54] Then continuously moving east at approximately 1.5°/day.[55] until positioned at 86.5°W in summer 2016.[56] In November 2016 started moving east at approx 0.5°/day until positioned at 47°W in mid-February 2017.[57]
NO LONGER OPERATIONAL
1A December 11, 1988 GE AstroSpace GE-4000 Ariane 44LP The first Astra satellite. Now retired in graveyard orbit.
1B March 2, 1991 GE AstroSpace GE-5000 Ariane 44LP Acquired from GE Americom (Satcom K3). Now retired in graveyard orbit.
1C May 12, 1993 Hughes HS-601 Ariane 42L Originally launched to 19.2°E. Used at 5°E. Unused and in inclined orbit at 72°W (summer 2014)[26] 1.2°W (September 2014)[58] 40°W (November 2014).[59] From February 2015, continuously moving west at approx 5.2°/day.[60]
1E October 19, 1995 Hughes HS-601 Ariane 42L Originally at 19.2°E. Used at 23.5°E pending launch of Astra 3B. Used at 5°E September 2010, pending launch of Astra 4B/SES-4, then moved April 2012 to 108.2°E where, as of November 2013, in inclined orbit.[61] Moved in February 2014 to 31.5°E pending launch of Astra 5B.[62] Returned to 23.5°E in February 2015. From June 2015, continuously moving west at approx 5.4°/day.[60]
1K November 26, 2002 Alcatel Space Spacebus 3000B3S Proton Launched to 19.2°E but failed to reach geostationary orbit, and intentionally de-orbited on December 10, 2002.
5A November 12, 1997 Alcatel Space Spacebus 3000 B2 Ariane 44L Formerly known as Sirius 2. Moved to 31.5°E and renamed Astra 5A on April 29, 2008. Failed in-orbit January 16, 2009


NSS fleet[edit]

This fleet came from the acquisition of New Skies Satellites in 2005, which itself had inherited 5 satellites from Intelsat in 1998.

Satellite Location Manufacturer Model Coverage Launch date Launch vehicle Comments

Active fleet[edit]

NSS-6 95° E Lockheed Martin A2100AX 50 Ku-band transponders to cover Asia, Australia, Africa, Middle East and 12 Ka-band super high gain uplink beams
DTH services to Asia, especially India.
December 17, 2002 Ariane 44L
NSS-7 20° W Lockheed Martin A2100AX 36 C-Band and 36 Ku-band transponders
Video broadcast covering South America and Africa
16 April 2002 Ariane 44L Originally at 22° W
NSS-9 177° W Orbital Sciences STAR-2.[63] 44 C-band transponders
Pacific Ocean: transcontinental video, voice and Internet; local service to Pacific islands
12 February 2009 Ariane 5 flight V-187[64]
NSS-10 37.5° W Thales Alenia Space Spacebus 4000C3 49 C-band transponders
Americas, Europe and Africa; telecom and VSAT operators.
3 February 2005 Proton-M/Briz-M[65] Formerly known as AMC-12/Astra 4A[66]
NSS-11 108.2° E Lockheed Martin A2100AX 28 Ku-band transponders
DTH voice, video and data in India, China and Philippines.
1 October 2000 Proton-K/DM-2M Formerly known as AAP-1, GE 1A or WorldSat-1[66]
NSS-12 57° E Space Systems/Loral FS-1300 40 C-band and 48 Ku-band active high-power transponders
Mobile backhaul services over the Middle East and Europe, Central and South Asia and East Africa.
29 October 2009 Ariane 5 ECA[67]
NSS-806 47° W Lockheed Martin AS-7000 28 C-band and 3 Ku-band transponders to cover Latin America, Iberian peninsula, Canary Islands, Western Europe and much of Eastern Europe. 27 February 1998 Atlas II AS Launched as Intelsat 806 at 40.5° W. Replaced by SES-6 in June 2013 and moved to 47° W
European beams retired, remaining C-band Hemi beam and Ku-band Spot beam cover South America only[68]

Retired satellites[edit]

NSS-5 50.5° E Lockheed Martin AS-7000 38 C-band, 12 Ku-band
Pacific Ocean region, shared capacity with Intelsat.
September 23, 1997 Ariane 42L Formerly known as NSS-803, launched as Intelsat 803. Moved from 183° E to 57° E to cover NSS-703's service area until NSS-12 launched Q3, 2009. Moved to 22° W and then 20° W as part of a swapout plan with NSS-7 and SES-4 that was to be completed by June 2012. Finally moved to 50.5° E in September 2012.
NSS-513 177°W Ford Aerospace 18 May 1988 Ariane 2 Launched as Intelsat 513. Decommissioned
NSS-703 57° E, then 47° W Space Systems/Loral LS-1300 6 October 1994 Atlas II AS Traffic moved to NSS-12 in January 2010,[69] satellite retired in October 2014[70]
NSS-K 21.5° W, then 183° E Lockheed Martin AS-5000 9 June 1992 Atlas IIA Decommissioned

Launch failures[edit]

NSS-8 Planned: 57° E Boeing BSS-702 30 January 2007 Zenit 3SL Rocket exploded on pad[71]

SES fleet[edit]

Satellite Location Manufacturer Model Coverage Launch
date
Launch
vehicle
Comments

Active fleet[edit]

SES-1 101°W Orbital Sciences Corporation STAR-2 24 C-band,
(USA, Mexico, Caribbean, Canada, Central America)
24 Ku-band,
(USA, Southern Canada, Northern Mexico)
24 April 2010 Proton-M / Briz-M[72] Replaced AMC-2,AMC-4 previously at 101°W[citation needed]
SES-2 87°W Orbital Sciences Corporation STAR-2 24 C-band,
(USA, Mexico, Caribbean, Canada, Central America)
24 Ku-band,
(USA, Southern Canada, Northern Mexico)
21 September 2011 Ariane 5 ECA Replaced AMC-3 previously at 87°W
SES-3 103°W Orbital Sciences Corporation STAR-2 24 C-band,
(USA, Mexico, Caribbean, Canada, Central America)
24 Ku-band,
(USA, Southern Canada, Northern Mexico)
15 July 2011 Proton-M / Briz-M [citation needed] Entering commercial service in March 2012.
SES-4 22°W Space Systems/Loral LS-1300 52 C-band, 72 Ku-band 14 February 2012 Proton-M / Briz-M Entering commercial service in April 2012. Formerly known as NSS-14.
SES-5 5°E Space Systems/Loral LS-1300 24 C-band, 36 Ku-band,
Europe, Africa and the Middle East.
Two Ku-band beams targeting Nordic/Baltic regions, and sub-Saharan Africa.
10 July 2012 Proton-M / Briz-M Entering commercial service summer 2012. Formerly called Astra 4B.
SES-6 40.5°W Astrium Eurostar E3000 43 C-band, 48 Ku-band.
(North America, Latin America, Europe, Atlantic Ocean)
3 June 2013 Proton-M / Briz-M Replaced NSS-806
SES-7 108.2°E Boeing Satellite Systems Boeing 601HP 22 Ku-band, 10 S-band.
(South Asia, Asia Pacific)
16 May 2009 Proton-M / Briz-M Formerly known as Indostar 2 / ProtoStar 2.
SES-8 95°E Orbital Sciences Corporation STAR-2 Up to 33 Ku-band.
(South Asia, Asia Pacific)
3 December 2013 Falcon 9 v1.1 First Falcon 9 launch to a geostationary orbit.[73][74]
SES-9 108.2°E Boeing Satellite Systems Boeing 702HP 81 Ku-band.
(South Asia, Asia Pacific)
from position 108.2E[75]
4 March 2016 Falcon 9 Full Thrust Second launch of Falcon 9 Full Thrust. Co-located with the SES-7 satellite.
SES-10 67°W Airbus Defence and Space Eurostar E3000 60 Ku-band
(Latin America)[76]
30 March 2017 Falcon 9 Full Thrust Replaced AMC-3 and AMC-4[76]
SES-11 / EchoStar 105 105°W Airbus Defence and Space Eurostar E3000 24 Ku-band, 24 C-band
(North America, Latin America and the Caribbean)[77]
11 October 2017 Falcon 9 Full Thrust Replaced AMC-15 and AMC-18[77]
SES-12 95°E Airbus Defence and Space Eurostar E3000 54 Ku-band
(South Asia, Asia-Pacific)[78]
4 June 2018[79] Falcon 9 Full Thrust Will replace NSS-6; co-located with SES-8[78]
SES-14 47.5°W Airbus Defence and Space Eurostar E3000 20 Ku-band HTS, 28 C-band
(Americas and North Atlantic)[80]
25 January 2018[81] Ariane 5 ECA Will replace NSS-806 and add capacity.[80] Hosts NASA’s Global-Scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) instrument payload.[82]
SES-15 129°W Boeing Satellite Systems Boeing 702SP 16 Ku-band
(North America, Latin America, Caribbean)[83]
18 May 2017[84] Soyuz-STA / Fregat-M Combines wide beams and HTS multi-spot beams[83]
GovSat-1 / SES-16 21.5°E Orbital ATK GEOStar-3 Military X-band and Ka-band[85] 31 January 2018[86] Falcon 9 Full Thrust Communications services for the government of Luxembourg[85][87]

Future launches[edit]

SES-17 Thales Alenia Space Spacebus Neo High Throughput Ka-band 2020[88] Ariane 5 ECA Connectivity services over the Americas optimized for commercial aviation.

Third-party satellites[edit]

SES also manages some transponders on a few third-party satellites under joint operating agreements.

Satellite Location Manufacturer Model Coverage Launch date Launch vehicle Comments

Active fleet[edit]

Ciel-2 129°W Thales Alenia Space Spacebus 4000C4 32 Ku-band transponders
HDTV for North America
December 10, 2008 Proton-M/Briz-M
MonacoSAT 52°E Thales Alenia Space Spacebus 4000C2 12 Ku-band transponders
HDTV for Middle East and North Africa
April 27, 2015 Falcon 9 v1.1 Satellite shared with the Turkmenistan National Space Agency
QuetzSat 1 77°W Space Systems/Loral LS-1300 32 Ku-band transponders
HDTV for Mexico, USA and Central America.
September 29, 2011 Proton-M/Briz-M
Yahsat 1A 52.5°E EADS Astrium Eurostar E3000 14 active C-band transponders, 25 Ku-band, 21 secure Ka-band
Broadcast TV for Europe, Middle East, North Africa
April 22, 2011 Ariane 5 ECA

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "ILS Successfully Launches AMC-11 Satellite; Celebrates 5 Missions in 5 Months" (Press release). International Launch Services. May 19, 2004. Archived from the original on October 9, 2010.
  3. ^ "ILS Proton Launches AMC-15 Satellite; 9th Mission in 9 Months" (Press release). International Launch Services. October 15, 2004. Archived from the original on October 10, 2010.
  4. ^ "ILS Launches AMC-16; Wraps Up Year With 10 Mission Successes" (Press release). International Launch Services. December 17, 2004. Archived from the original on December 19, 2010.
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  6. ^ "Another successful Arianespace launch: Superbird-7 and AMC-21 in orbit" (Press release). Arianespace. August 14, 2008. Archived from the original on September 18, 2010.
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  10. ^ "A large satellite appears to be falling apart in geostationary orbit". Ars Technica.
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  12. ^ Bains, Geoff "The Failsafe Family" What Satellite & Digital TV April, 2012 pp29
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  20. ^ ASTRA 2F arrives at the Guiana Space Centre, Kourou August 23, 2012 SES blog. Accessed August 26, 2012
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