Brown County, Wisconsin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Brown County, Wisconsin
2009-0620-GB-BrownCtyCt.jpg
Brown County Courthouse in Green Bay
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Brown County
Location in the state of Wisconsin
Map of the United States highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location in the U.S.
Founded 1818
Named for Jacob Brown
Seat Green Bay
Largest city Green Bay
Area
 • Total 616 sq mi (1,595 km2)
 • Land 530 sq mi (1,373 km2)
 • Water 86 sq mi (223 km2), 14.0%
Population
 • (2010) 248,007
 • Density 468/sq mi (181/km²)
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.brown.wi.us

Brown County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 248,007,[1] making it the fourth-most populous county in Wisconsin. The county seat is Green Bay.

Brown County is included in the Green Bay Metropolitan Statistical Area, which also includes Kewaunee and Oconto counties.

Brown County is one of Wisconsin's two original counties along with Crawford County and originally spanned the entire eastern half of the state when formed by the Michigan Territorial legislature in 1818. It has since been subdivided to its present area. It was named for Major General Jacob Brown, a successful military leader during the War of 1812.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 616 square miles (1,600 km2), of which 530 square miles (1,400 km2) is land and 86 square miles (220 km2) (14.0%) is water.[2]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 2,107
1850 6,215 195.0%
1860 11,795 89.8%
1870 25,168 113.4%
1880 34,078 35.4%
1890 39,164 14.9%
1900 46,359 18.4%
1910 54,098 16.7%
1920 61,889 14.4%
1930 70,249 13.5%
1940 83,109 18.3%
1950 98,314 18.3%
1960 125,082 27.2%
1970 158,244 26.5%
1980 175,280 10.8%
1990 194,594 11.0%
2000 226,778 16.5%
2010 248,007 9.4%
Est. 2012 253,032 2.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[3]
1790-1960[4] 1900-1990[5]
1990-2000[6] 2010-2012[1]
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Brown County

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 226,778 people, 87,295 households, and 57,527 families residing in the county. The population density was 429 people per square mile (166/km²). There were 90,199 housing units at an average density of 171 per square mile (66/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.14% White, 1.16% Black or African American, 2.29% Native American, 2.18% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.90% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. 3.84% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 33.8% were of German, 8.9% Polish, 7.8% Belgian and 6.8% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000. 93.2% spoke only English at home, 3.8% spoke Spanish and 1.2% Hmong.

There were 87,295 households out of which 33.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.20% were married couples living together, 8.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.10% were non-families. 26.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.10% under the age of 18, 10.50% from 18 to 24, 31.90% from 25 to 44, 20.90% from 45 to 64, and 10.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 98.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.90 males.

Government[edit]

The legislative branch of Brown County is the 26-member Board of Supervisors. Each member represents a single member district and serves a two-year term, with elections held in the spring of even-numbered years. The Board of Supervisors elects a Chairman and Vice Chairman from its membership.

The executive branch of Brown County is the County Executive, who is elected in the Spring of every other odd-numbered year. The executive appoints department heads with the approval of the County Board. The current county executive is Troy Steckenbach.

Brown County has several other elected officials that are established under the Wisconsin State constitution and are referred to as the Constitutional Officers. Constitutional Officers are the only partisan elected officials within Brown County Government, as the Executive and County Board are non-partisan positions.

The current Constitutional Officers are:

  • County Executive: Troy Streckenbach
  • Clerk: Sandy Juno (R)
  • Clerk of Circuit Courts: Jason B. Beck (R)
  • District Attorney: David L. Lasee (R)
  • Register of Deeds: Cathy Williquette (D)
  • Sheriff: John Gossage (R)
  • Treasurer: Kerry Blaney (D)

In July 2002, the county declared English as its official language, voting 17-8 to do so and to increase spending to promote fluency in English.

Communities[edit]

Farmland in rural Brown County

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Native American communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  2. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Deborah B. Martin, History of Brown Country Wisconsin: Past and Present. Two volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1913.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°29′N 87°59′W / 44.48°N 87.99°W / 44.48; -87.99