Kafr Qara

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kufur Qara
Hebrew transcription(s)
 • Hebrew כַּפְר קַרִע
 • ISO 259 Kpar Qáriˁ
 • Also spelled Kefar Qara (official)
Kfar Qari (unofficial)
Arabic transcription(s)
 • Arabic كفر قرع
Kafr Qara P1070763.JPG
Official logo of Kufur Qara
Logo
Kufur Qara is located in Israel
Kufur Qara
Kufur Qara
Coordinates: 32°30′20.89″N 35°3′13.76″E / 32.5058028°N 35.0538222°E / 32.5058028; 35.0538222Coordinates: 32°30′20.89″N 35°3′13.76″E / 32.5058028°N 35.0538222°E / 32.5058028; 35.0538222
District Haifa
Government
 • Type Local council
Area
 • Total 7,000 dunams (7 km2 or 3 sq mi)
Population (2009)[1]
 • Total 15,300
Name meaning "The village of the gourd"[2]

Kafr Qara or Kafr Qari (Arabic: كفر قرع‎, Hebrew: כַּפְר קַרִע) is an Israeli-Arab town 22 miles (35 km) southeast of Haifa, Israel. In 2009, the population was 15,300.[1] Kfar Qara holds the highest record for doctors relative to population size in the country, around 14.8 doctors per 1,000 citizens (2007, with more than 50 medicine student back then), Kfar Qara known as well for recording a high rate of academics and Master's degree holders.[2].

History[edit]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1859 the population was 450 people, who cultivated 32 feddans of land.[3] In 1883, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described Kefr Kara as a "good-sized stone village on high ground, with a well to the east, and caves."[3]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Kufr Qara had a population 776, 9 Christians and 767 Muslims.[4] This had increased in the 1931 census to 1,109, 4 Christians and 1,105 Muslims, in 198 houses.[5]

In 1945, Kafr Qari had a population of 1,510 Arabs, who owned 14,543 dunams of land.[6] Of this, 227 dunams were for plantations and irrigable land, 11,516 for cereals,[7] while 25 dunams were built-up (urban) land.[8]

post 1948[edit]

Kafr Qara is part of the Triangle. It is located in the Wadi Ara region, northwest of the Green Line. Most of the inhabitants are Muslim.[1] It is governed by a local council. Kafr Qara now has about 7000 dunams of land left, after land was expropriated by the local authorities and Israeli government for public and military use.[9] WAC, an independent labor association, is located in the village.[10]

Education[edit]

In September 2003, a group of local parents founded a bilingual, multicultural elementary school in Kafr Qara, named Hand in Hand – Bridge over the Wadi, or "Bridge over the Wadi". Kafr Qara high school, established in 1970 as a vocational school, is now a comprehensive high school for 10th–12th graders from Kafr Qara and environs. The school has participated in multicultural projects such as Jitli, and offers a joint leadership program for Arab and Jewish teenagers.[9]

Kfar Qara holds the highest record for doctors relative to population size in the country , around 14.8 doctors per 1,000 citizens(2007, with more than 50 medicine student back then) , Kfar Qara known as well for recording a high rate of academics and Master's degree holders.[11]

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Table 3 - Population of Localities Numbering Above 2,000 Residents and Other Rural Population" (PDF). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. 2010-06-30. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  2. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 147
  3. ^ a b Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 42
  4. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Haifa, p. 34
  5. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 94
  6. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, ' 1970, p. 48
  7. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 90
  8. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 140
  9. ^ a b "Arab minority in Israel" (PDF). Retrieved 2011-11-25. 
  10. ^ Stern, Yoav (2011-04-17). "Kfar Qara group to protest lack of work caused by import of foreign labor - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News". Haaretz.com. Retrieved 2011-11-25. 
  11. ^ [1]

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]