Super Nintendo Entertainment System (Model SNS-101)

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The SNS-101 with remodeled controller.

The SNS-101 model of the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (informally known as the SNES 2, the SNES Mini or SNES Jr.) is a compact redesign of the original Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) video game console from Nintendo.[citation needed] Nintendo itself marketed it simply as the Super Nintendo Entertainment System exactly the same as the original SNS-001 model. It was released in North America on October 20, 1997[1] and retailed for US$99.95[2] including one pack-in game such as:

It was also available in a standalone package. The SNS-101 model is stylistically similar to the Super Famicom Jr, which was released in Japan five months later.

Changes[edit]

SNS-101 standalone package

The SNS-101 model was a lighter and more compact redesign of the original SNS-001 model of the SNES. It was designed by Lance Barr, who also designed the original SNS-001, the first North American NES model and the Model NES-101 redesign.[4] Released at a lower price point, Nintendo marketed it as an entry-level gamer's system[5] for customers who were on a budget and who may have been put-off by the large outlay required for other more modern systems such as the Nintendo 64, Sega Saturn and PlayStation.

The SNS-101 lacks the expansion slot on the base featured on the SNS-001, making it incompatible with the Japan only Satellaview add-on. The power and reset buttons were moved to the left hand side, and it no longer has a cartridge eject button. As with the redesigned NES (NES-101) before it, the SNS-101 model has no LED power light to indicate when the unit is on (as the original NES, SNES, and N64 all included) The RF connector was also removed, however an N64 RF modulator can be used to give the SNS-101 RF output if required.[6]

The SNS-101 features the same "MULTI OUT" audio/video connector used on the original SNS-001 model.[7] However the SNS-101 only outputs composite video and stereo audio through this port, even though the original SNS-001 supported composite video, S-Video and RGB. The video encoder chip used in the system still supports S-Video and RGB, but these pins were left unused. Many users who wished for a better picture resorted to modifying the system to restore this missing functionality.[8]

Controller redesign[edit]

SNS-102 separately packaged controller

Some slight cosmetic changes were also made to the controller. The 'Super Nintendo' silk screened logo was removed and replaced by a 'Nintendo' logo molded into the casing. The button color changed to a darker shade of purple, and the controller had a new designation code i.e. SNS-102.

Counterfeits[edit]

The SNS-101 is quite unusual in that it is perhaps the only known example of a Nintendo console having fake/counterfeit clones posing as a genuine console. Most clone consoles usually adopt different names or case designs, however with the SNS-101 almost every detail was copied and reproduced to some degree — including the packaging. In recent years many of these clones have been mistakenly bought by users on auction sites such as eBay under the impression that they are brand new original SNS-101 systems, sometimes even the seller is unaware they are not original. Most games can still be played with these clones systems, however the build quality is not as high. There are guides available on how to spot fake SNS-101 consoles.[9] The clone controllers were also sold separately in copies of the genuine controllers' packaging. You can usually tell a fake SNES mini by whether it has the Nintendo security screws or the regular Philips head screws

Super Famicom Jr. (Model SHVC-101)[edit]

Super Famicom Jr.

The Super Famicom Jr. or Super Famicom Junior, often abbreviated as SFC Jr, was a redesign of the original Super Famicom video game console that had been released by Nintendo in Japan in 1990. It was stylistically similar to the SNS-101 released in North America five months earlier. It was released in Japan on March 27, 1998 and retailed for ¥7800.[10] It was manufactured until September 2003.[11]

The Super Famicom Jr. was lighter and more compact redesign of the original Super Famicom console. It was almost identical to the SNS-101 console released in North America previously, and featured the same connections and outputs.

The Super Famicom Jr. lacks the expansion slot on the base featured on the original Super Famicom, making it incompatible with the Satellaview add-on released in Japan. As with the AV Famicom redesign before it, the Super Famicom Jr. lacks a LED power light to indicate when the unit is on (as the original NES, SNES, and N64 all included).

Differences between the North American SNS-101 include the power and reset buttons colored grey instead of purple, the different shape of the cartridge port to accommodate the rounder-edged Japanese games, and the Super Nintendo logo no longer molded into the plastic, instead having a recessed 'Super Famicom' plastic label. The "MULTI OUT" connector was also renamed "AV OUT" for the Super Famicom Jr. The Super Famicom Jr. also uses the same AC adapter as the original Super Famicom and Famicom.

The controller also retains the multi-colored buttons used on the original Super Famicom controller instead of the purple buttons used in North America. However, despite the different colored buttons it still retains the same SNS-102 model number used on the North American controller (instead of an SHVC model number used on all other Super Famicom parts), as Nintendo used the same case mold for both regions.

As with the SNS-101, the Super Famicom Jr. features the same audio/video connector used on the original Super Famicom model. However, the Super Famicom Jr. only outputs composite video and stereo audio through this port, even though the original Super Famicom supported composite video, S-Video and RGB, because of this the connector was renamed "AV OUT" instead of "MULTI OUT" as used on the original Super Famicom. The video encoder chip used in the system still supports S-Video and RGB, but these pins were left unused. Many users who wished for a better picture resorted to modifying the system to restore this missing functionality.[8] The RF connector used on the original Super Famicom was also removed, however the N64 RF modulator could be used to give the Super Famicom Jr. RF output if required.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "SNS-101". Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  2. ^ Johnston, Chris (1997-10-29). "Super NES Lives!". GameSpot. Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  3. ^ "Yoshi's Island Package Shot". Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  4. ^ Chad Margetts & M. Noah Ward (2005-05-31). "Lance Barr Interview". Nintendojo. Retrieved 2013-03-02. 
  5. ^ Ohbuchi, Yutaka (1998-01-16). "Super Fami Gets Face-Lift". GameSpot. Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  6. ^ "Nintendo Support: New-Style Super NES RF to TV Hookup". Nintendo. Retrieved 2010-03-02. 
  7. ^ "Nintendo Support: Super NES AV to TV Hookup". Nintendo. Retrieved 2010-03-02. 
  8. ^ a b "SNESjr RGB Mod". Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  9. ^ "How to recognize a counterfeit SNES". Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  10. ^ "Nintendo Japan - Super Famicom Jr page". Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  11. ^ Niizumi, Hirohiko (2003-05-30). "Nintendo to end Famicom and Super Famicom production". GameSpot. Retrieved 2014-01-11.