Thomas H. Carter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Thomas Henry Carter
Portrait of Thomas H. Carter.jpg
United States Senator
from Montana
In office
March 4, 1895 – March 4, 1901
March 4, 1905 – March 4, 1911
Preceded by Thomas C. Power
Paris Gibson
Succeeded by William A. Clark
Henry L. Myers
Personal details
Born (1854-10-30)October 30, 1854
Portsmouth, Ohio
Died September 17, 1911(1911-09-17) (aged 56)
Washington, D.C.
Political party Republican
Profession Politician, Lawyer, Farmer, Teacher

Thomas Henry Carter (October 30, 1854 – September 17, 1911) was a delegate, a United States Representative, and a U.S. Senator from Montana.

Biography[edit]

Carter was born near Portsmouth, Ohio, and later his family moved to Pana, Illinois. Carter attended the common schools in Illinois. He engaged in farming, school teaching, and railroading; at the same time studied law and was admitted to the bar. In 1882, he moved from Burlington, Iowa, to Helena, Montana. In Montana he was elected as a Republican Delegate to the Fifty-first Congress and served from March 4, 1889, to November 7, 1889, when the Territory was admitted as a State into the Union; elected as its first Representative and served from November 8, 1889, to March 3, 1891.

Career in Government[edit]

He served as chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining (Fifty-first Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate in 1890 for reelection; Commissioner of the General Land Office 1891-1892, when he was elected chairman of the Republican National Committee. He was the first Catholic to be the chairman of the party.[1]

He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1895, until March 3, 1901. As a Senator he was chairman of the Committee on Relations with Canada (Fifty-fourth Congress), the Committee on the Census (Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Congresses). President William McKinley appointed him a member of the board of commissioners of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and served as its president; again elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1905, to March 3, 1911. He was not a candidate for reelection.

He died in Washington, D.C., September 17, 1911. He was interred at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

Legacy[edit]

Carter County, Montana is named in his honor.

References[edit]