Tonk (princely state)

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This article is about the Princely State of Tonk. For the city of Tonk, see Tonk, India. For the district of Tonk, see Tonk district.
Tonk State
टोंक
Princely State
1798–1947

Flag of Tonk

Flag

History
 -  Established 1798
 -  Independence of India 1947

Tonk was a Princely State of India which by treaty in 1817 accepted British suzerainty. Following the Partition of India in 1947, Tonk acceded to the newly independent Union of India. It was located in the region that is now the Tonk district.

The Haraoti-Tonk Agency, with headquarters at Deoli, dealt with the states of Tonk and Bundi, as well as with the state of Shahpura.[1]

History[edit]

The founder of the state was Muhammad Amir Khan (1768-1834), an adventurer and military leader of Afghan descent. In 1817, upon submitting to the British East India Company, he received the territory of Tonk and the title of Nawab. While retaining internal autonomy and remaining outside British India, the state came under the supervision of the Rajputana Agency and consisted of six isolated districts. Three of these were under the Rajputana Agency, namely, Tonk, Aligarh (formerly Rampura) and Nimbahera. The other three, Chhabra, Pirawa and Sironj were in the Central India Agency.

The total area of the princely state was 2553 sq. mi, with a total population in 1901 of 273,201. The town of Tonk, capital of the state, had a population of 38,759 in that year. The town was surrounded by a wall and boasted a mud fort. It had a high school, the Walter hospital for women, under a matron, and a separate hospital for men.

The princely state enjoyed an estimated revenue of £77,000; however, no tribute was payable to the government of British India. Grain, cotton, opium and hides were the chief products and exports of the state. Two of the outlying tracts of the state were served by two different railways.

A former minister of Tonk state, Sahibzada Obeidullah Khan, was deputed on political duty to Peshawar during the Tirah campaign of 1897.

In 1899-1900, the state suffered much distress due to drought.

Nawab Sir Muhammad Ibrahim Ali Khan GCIE (ruled 1867-1930) was one of few chiefs to attend both Lord Lytton's Durbar in 1877 and the Delhi Durbar of 1903 as ruler.

In 1947, on the Partition of India whereby India and Pakistan gained independence, the Nawab of Tonk decided to accede to the Union of India. Subsequently, most of the area of the state of Tonk was integrated into the Rajasthan state, while some of its eastern enclaves became part of Madhya Pradesh.

The foundation of the principality of Tonk led to the creation of a large Rajasthani Pathan community.

The Salarzai nawabs of Tonk[edit]

The last ruler, Nawab Muhammad Aftab Ali Khan, has one son, Muhammad Junaid Ali Khan (born 1986)

  • Muhammad Amir Khan 1798 - 1834
  • Muhammad Wazir Khan 1834 - 1864
  • Nawab Muhammad Ali Khan 1864 - 1867
  • Nawab Muhammad Ibrahim Ali Khan 1867 - June 23, 1930
  • Nawab Muhammad Sa'adat Ali Khan June 23, 1930 - May 31, 1947
  • Nawab Muhammad Faruq Ali Khan 1947 - 1948
  • Nawab Muhammad Ismail Ali Khan [1948 - 1974]
  • Nawab Muhammad Masoom Ali Khan (1974/94)
  • Nawab Muhammad Aftab Ali Khan (1994 onwards)


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Imperial Gazetteer of India vol. IV (1907), The Indian Empire, Administrative, Published under the authority of His Majesty's Secretary of State for India in Council, Oxford at the Clarendon Press. Pp. xxx, 1 map, 552

External links[edit]