Faridkot State

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Faridkot State
ਫਰੀਦਕੋਟ
Princely State

1803–1947

Flag of Faridkot

Flag

Historical era New Imperialism
 -  Established 1803
 -  Partition of India 1947

Faridkot State, with its capital at Faridkot, was a Princely state in Punjab region, it was one of the Cis-Sutlej states and was under the suzerainty of the Scindhia dynasty of the Maratha Empire, following the Second Anglo-Maratha War of 1803–1805, Marathas lost the territory to the British. For the support the British in overcoming the mutiny of 1857, the ruler of Faridkot was accorded a 11-gun salute as per the rules of precedence in the Imperial Durbar.

List of Faridkot rulers[edit]

Jaisal dynasty[edit]

  • 1643 - 1708 Kapura Singh (born 1628 - died 1708)
  • 1708 - 1710 Sajja Singh (b. ... - died 1710)
  • 1710 - 1731 Sukha Singh (born 1681 - died 1731)
  • 1731 - 1763 ...
  • 1763 - 1782 Hamir Singh (b. ... - died 1782)
  • 1782 - 1798 Mohr Singh (b. ... - died 1798)
  • 1798 - 1804 Kharat Singh (b. ... - died 1804)
  • 1804 Dal Singh (b. ... - died 1804)
  • 1804 - 5 November 1826 Ghulab Singh (b. c.1797 - died 1826)
  • 1826 - August 1827 Attar Singh (born 1823 - died 1827)
  • 1827 - 1846 Pahar Singh (b. ... - died 1849)

Rajas[edit]

  • 1846 - April 1849 Pahar Singh (s.a.)
  • 1849 - April 1874 Wazir Singh (born 1811 - died 1874)
  • 1874 - 8 August 1898 Vikram Singh (born 1842 - died 1898)
  • 1898 - 1906 Balbir Singh (born 1870 - died 1906)
  • 11 February 1906 - 1918 Balbir Indar Singh (born 1896 - died 1918)

Maharaja[edit]

Faridkot State Stamp
  • 1918 - 23 December 1918 Balbir Indar Singh (s.a.)

Raja[edit]

23 December 1918 - 15 August 1947 Har Indar Singh (born 1915 - died 1989)

Faridkot had issued postage stamps independently from 1879 to 1887 when it signed a postal convention with the British.

Demography[edit]

Faridkot had an area of 643 square miles.[1]:33-38 According to the 1901 census the state had a population of 124,912 and contained 2 towns and 167 villages.[2] Predominantly agricultural, it had two small towns, Faridkot and Kotkapura.

Further reading[edit]

  • Subhash Parihar
  • Architectural Heritage of a Sikh State: Faridkot (Delhi: Aryan Books International, 2009)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]