Ōhāriu (New Zealand electorate)

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Ōhāriu electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Ōhāriu, previously styled Ohariu and then Ōhariu, is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives. It first existed from 1978 to 1993, and was recreated for the 2008 election. In 2008, it was the successor to Ohariu-Belmont, first contested at the first mixed-member proportional (MMP) election in 1996. Through its existence Ohariu-Belmont was represented by Peter Dunne, leader of the United Future party. Dunne contested and won the recreated electorate in 2008.

Population centres[edit]

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government.[1] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill out an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island.[2] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Ohariu) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election.[3]

The Ohariu electorate replaced the Karori electorate, but did not include any of Khandallah or Ngaio.[4]

In 2008, the boundaries of the Ohariu-Belmont and Ōhariu electorates were near identical except for the removal of the eponymous Lower Hutt suburb of Belmont into the Rimutaka electorate and the addition of Crofton Downs from Wellington Central. The new electorate contained the section of Wellington City between Crofton Downs and southern Tawa, including Ngaio, Khandallah, Johnsonville and Newlands. The rest of the electorate consisted of Lower Hutt's hill suburbs of Korokoro, Maungaraki and Normandale. Ōhariu was one of eleven electorate names to include a macron, for the first time. The name was later change to include a second macron.

Both Ohariu-Belmont and Ōhāriu are young and wealthy; it has the largest number of 30- to 49-year-olds in the country, and the second highest number of families earning between $70,000 and $100,000 per year. 69% of its population is New Zealand European, 14% Asian and 8% Māori.[5]

History[edit]

Despite Dunne having a 7,702 vote majority in Ohariu-Belmont at the 2005 election,[6] United's performance was less impressive. In 2005 it won just 5.6% of the party vote (down from 13.0% in 2002) in an electorate dominated by the big two parties: National came out on top in the party vote with 43.1%, beating Labour by 3.6%, having been reduced to 24.4% three years earlier.[7]

Historically Ohariu (without a macron) was an electorate based around north and western Wellington, contested between 1978 and 1990. A substantial redrawing of Wellington's boundaries ahead of the last First Past the Post election in 1993 led to Ohariu being divided between Wellington-Karori and the new electorate of Onslow. Dunne, then a member of the Labour Party, was the MP for the old Ohariu between 1984 until its abolition, and won Onslow in 1993.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Key

 National    Labour    United Future    Green  

Election Winner
1978 election Hugh Templeton
1981 election
1984 election Peter Dunne
1987 election
1990 election
(Electorate abolished 1993-2008, see Onslow)
2008 election Peter Dunne1
2011 election
2014 election

1Dunne defected to United New Zealand in 1995.

List MPs[edit]

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Ōhāriu electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

Election Winner
2008 election Charles Chauvel
Katrina Shanks
2011 election Charles Chauvel
Gareth Hughes
Katrina Shanks
2014 election Brett Hudson

Election results[edit]

2014 election[edit]

General Election 2014: Ōhāriu[8]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
United Future Green tickY Peter Dunne 13,569 36.58 −2.00 273 0.73 −1.05
Labour Virginia Andersen 12,859 34.66 −0.18 8,771 23.42 −3.11
National Brett Hudson 6,120 16.50 −2.06 18,810 50.23 +0.63
Green Tane Woodley 2,764 7.45 +1.65 5,623 15.01 +0.59
Conservative Michael Brunner 1,038 2.80 +1.78 1,118 2.99 +1.31
Independent Sue Hamill 211 0.57 +0.57
ACT Sean Fitzpatrick 209 0.56 +0.56 250 0.67 −0.09
Democrats Alida Steemson 46 0.12 +0.12 22 0.06 +0.03
NZ First   1,781 4.76 +0.85
Internet Mana   258 0.69 +0.50
Māori   215 0.57 +0.04
Legalise Cannabis   146 0.39 −0.03
Civilian   29 0.08 +0.08
Ban 1080   15 0.04 +0.04
Independent Coalition   9 0.02 +0.02
Focus   4 0.01 +0.01
Informal votes 283 126
Total Valid votes 37,099 37,450
United Future hold Majority 710 1.91 −1.83

2011 election[edit]

General Election 2011: Ōhāriu[9]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
United Future Green tickY Peter Dunne 14,357 38.58 +5.97 672 1.78 -0.43
Labour Charles Chauvel 12,965 34.84 +4.89 10,036 26.53 -6.80
National Katrina Shanks 6,907 18.56 -7.97 18,764 49.60 +3.33
Green Gareth Hughes 2,160 5.80 -1.26 5,453 14.42 +5.28
Conservative Stephen Woodnutt 378 1.02 +1.02 636 1.68 +1.68
NZ First Hugh Barr 339 0.91 +0.91 1,478 3.91 +1.82
Libertarianz Sean Fitzpatrick 109 0.29 +0.29 47 0.12 +0.07
ACT   286 0.76 -2.66
Māori   201 0.53 -0.20
Legalise Cannabis   160 0.42 +0.11
Mana   73 0.19 +0.19
Alliance   12 0.03 -0.11
Democrats   10 0.03 +0.003
Informal votes 369 137
Total Valid votes 37,215 37,828
United Future hold Majority 1,392 3.74 +1.07

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 46,740[10]

2008 election[edit]

General Election 2008: Ōhariu[11]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
United Future Green tickY Peter Dunne 12,303 32.61 843 2.21
Labour Charles Chauvel 11,297 29.95 12,728 33.33
National Katrina Shanks 10,009 26.53 17,670 46.27
Green Gareth Hughes 2,665 7.06 3,488 9.13
Kiwi Joel Sison 522 1.38 283 0.74
ACT Colin du Plessis 487 1.29 1,304 3.41
Legalise Cannabis Danyl Strype 330 0.87 119 0.31
Alliance Kelly Buchanan 111 0.29 55 0.14
NZ First   798 2.09
Māori   278 0.73
Progressive   273 0.71
Bill and Ben   208 0.54
Family Party   65 0.17
Pacific   22 0.06
Libertarianz   20 0.05
Workers Party   11 0.03
Democrats   9 0.02
RAM   7 0.02
RONZ   7 0.02
Informal votes 242 88
Total Valid votes 37,724 38,188
United Future win new seat Majority 1,006 2.67

1990 election[edit]

1990 general election: Ohariu[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Peter Dunne 9,930 45.0 -12.4
National George Mathew 9,147 41.4
Green G B Reese 1,839 8.3
NewLabour Chris Ritchie 682 3.0
McGillicuddy Serious G E M Boutel 138 0.6
Independent A R Kirk 131 0.5
Social Credit A E Smith 91 0.4
Democrats Bob Stevenson 85 0.3
Majority 783 3.5 -17.3
Turnout 22,043

1987 election[edit]

General election, 1987: Ohariu[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Peter Dunne 12,983 58.6 +20.7
National David Lloyd 8,491 38.4
Democrats W J Campbell 448 2.0
McGillicuddy Serious D J R Alyward 136 0.6
NZ Party K L Ralph 94 0.4
Majority 4,492 20.2 +14.0
Turnout 24,507 92.3 -4.6

1984 election[edit]

General election, 1984: Ohariu[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Peter Dunne 8,282 37.9
National Hugh Templeton 6,911 31.7 -13.9
NZ Party Bob Jones 6,326 29.0
Social Credit M K Loncar 275 1.2
United Front R T Obee 42 0.2
Majority 1,371 6.2
Turnout 22,944 96.9 +5.5

1981 election[edit]

General election, 1981: Ohariu[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
National Hugh Templeton 9,261 45.6 -1.0
Labour Norman Ely 7,694 37.9
Social Credit E B Elliot 3,102 15.3 +4.6
LIFE Party N L Mander 250 1.2
Majority 1,567 7.7 -2.7
Turnout 22,349 91.4 +21.9

1978 election[edit]

General election, 1978: Ohariu[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
National Hugh Templeton 8,809 46.6
Labour Helene Ritchie 6,851 36.3
Social Credit E B Elliott 2,015 10.7
Values H R P Wilson 735 3.9
Right to Life L D B Gee 471 2.5
Majority 1,958 10.4
Turnout 27,290 69.5

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  2. ^ McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  3. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  4. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 114–119.
  5. ^ - New Zealand Parliament Electorate Profiles: Ohariu-Belmont
  6. ^ election result Ohariu-Belmont 2005
  7. ^ election result Ohariu-Belmont 2002
  8. ^ 2014 election results
  9. ^ 2011 election results
  10. ^ "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011. 
  11. ^ 2008 election results
  12. ^ Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1990. 
  13. ^ a b c d Norton 1988, pp. 294.

References[edit]

  • McRobie, Alan (1989). Electoral Atlas of New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books. ISBN 0-477-01384-8. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 
  • Norton, Clifford (1988). New Zealand Parliamentary Election Results 1946–1987: Occasional Publications No 1, Department of Political Science. Wellington: Victoria University of Wellington. ISBN 0-475-11200-8.