Grand Boulevard, Chicago

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Grand Boulevard
Community area
Community Area 38 - Grand Boulevard
The Harold Washington Cultural Center
Location within the city of Chicago
Location within the city of Chicago
Coordinates: 41°48.6′N 87°37.2′W / 41.8100°N 87.6200°W / 41.8100; -87.6200Coordinates: 41°48.6′N 87°37.2′W / 41.8100°N 87.6200°W / 41.8100; -87.6200
Country United States
State Illinois
County Cook
City Chicago
Neighborhoods
Area
 • Total 1.73 sq mi (4.48 km2)
Population (2015)
 • Total 22,373[1]
Demographics 2015[1]
 • White 3.21%
 • Black 90.62%
 • Hispanic 2.57%
 • Asian 0.52%
 • Other 3.08%
Time zone UTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes parts of 60609, 60615 and 60653
Median household income $30,260[1]
Source: U.S. Census, Record Information Services

Grand Boulevard, located on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, is one of the well-defined Chicago Community Areas. The boulevard from which the community area takes its name now bears the name of Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive. The area is bounded by 39th to the north, 51st Street to the south, Cottage Grove Avenue to the east, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad tracks to the west.

This is one of the two community areas that encompass the Bronzeville neighborhood, with the other being Douglas. Grand Boulevard also includes the Washington Park Court District neighborhood that was declared a Chicago Landmark on October 2, 1991.[2]

The Harold Washington Cultural Center is one of its newer and more famous buildings. Among the other notable properties in this neighborhood are Daniel Hale Williams House, Robert S. Abbott House and Oscar Stanton De Priest House

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
193087,005
1940103,25618.7%
1950114,55710.9%
196080,036−30.1%
197080,1660.2%
198053,741−33.0%
199035,897−33.2%
200028,006−22.0%
201021,929−21.7%
[3]

According to a 2016 analysis by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, there were 22,373 people and 9,697 households in Grand Boulevard. The racial makeup of the area was 3.2% White, 90.6% African American, 0.5% Asian, and 3.1% from other races. Hispanic or Latino residents of any race were 2.6% of the population. In the area, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 19, 19.2% from 20 to 34, 22.9% from 35 to 49, 16.1% from 50 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years.[4]

Education[edit]

Grand Boulevard is part of City of Chicago School District #299 and City Colleges of Chicago District #508. The nearest City Colleges campus was Kennedy–King College in Englewood. A high school diploma had been earned by 84.4% of Hegewisch residents and a bachelor's degree had been earned by 27.1% of residents compared to citywide figures of 82.3% and 35.6% respectively.[4]

Transportation[edit]

The Chicago Transit Authority operates the Chicago "L" system in the Grand Boulevard community area. The Green Line provides rapid transit at four stations: Indiana, 43rd Street, 47th Street and 51st Street stations.

Notable people[edit]

External links[edit]


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Community Data Snapshot - Grand Boulevard" (PDF). cmap.illinois.gov. MetroPulse. Retrieved November 29, 2017.
  2. ^ "Washington Park Court District". City of Chicago Department of Planning and Development, Landmarks Division. 2003. Archived from the original on 2007-05-20. Retrieved 2007-03-30.
  3. ^ Paral, Rob. "Chicago Community Areas Historical Data". Chicago Community Areas Historical Data. Archived from the original on 2013-03-18.
  4. ^ a b Hallas, Jon, ed. (June 2016). "Community Demographic Snapshot: Grand Boulevard" (PDF). Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning. Retrieved March 19, 2017.
  5. ^ "Robert S. Abbott House". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2008-01-03. Retrieved 2008-03-02.
  6. ^ "Clubwoman's Passing Mourned". Chicago Defender. November 30, 1960 – via ProQuest. (Subscription required (help)).
  7. ^ "De Priest, Oscar Stanton, House". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2008-03-03. Retrieved 2008-07-20.
  8. ^ "BA #064:'Open' Mike Eagle". Box Angeles podcast.
  9. ^ Weil, Martin (March 7, 2006). "Hall of Fame Outfielder Kirby Puckett Dies at 45". Washington Post. Retrieved June 3, 2018.
  10. ^ Brachear, Manya A. (October 1, 2004). "Still Mr. T: The `T' is for testimony". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved June 3, 2018.
  11. ^ Weisse, Allen B. (2011). "Cardiac Surgery: A Century of Progress". Texas Heart Institute Journal. 38 (5): 486–490. PMC 3231540. PMID 22163121.
  12. ^ National Historic Landmarks Program - Williams, Daniel Hale, HouseArchived 2011-06-05 at the Wayback Machine. (2006). Retrieved 25 June 2007.