John Ford filmography

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John Ford with portrait and Oscar, circa 1946

John Ford (1894–1973) was an American film director whose career spanned from 1913 to 1971.[1] During this time he directed more than 140 films. Born in Maine, Ford enter films almost directly from high school with the help of his older brother, Francis Ford, who had established himself as a leading man and director for Universal Studios.[2] After working as an actor, assistant director, stuntman, and prop man – often for his brother – Universal gave Ford the opportunity to direct in 1917.[3] Initially working in short films, he quickly moved into features, largely with Harry Carey as his star.[4] Ford worked exclusively in westerns until 1920 when he began working in other genres.[5] In 1920 Ford left Universal and began working for the Fox Film Corporation.[6] During the next ten years he directed over 30 films, including the westerns The Iron Horse (1924) and 3 Bad Men (1926), both starring George O'Brien,[7] the war drama Four Sons and the Irish romantic drama Hangman's House (both 1928 and both starring Victor McLaglen).[8] In the same year is these last two films, Ford directed his first all-talking film, the short Napoleon's Barber.[9] The following year he directed his first all-talking feature, The Black Watch.[10]

In 1931 Ford began working for other studios, starting with Arrowsmith for Samuel Goldwyn.[11] In 1934, he began a lengthy association with producer Merian C. Cooper at RKO Radio Pictures.[12] The following year he directed The Informer, which brought him his first Academy Award for Best Director and the Best Actor Award for its star, Victor McLaglen.[13] In 1939, Ford began to make a series of outstanding films starting with Stagecoach, which made John Wayne a major star and brought an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor to Thomas Mitchell.[3][14][15] It was also the first time Ford filmed in Monument Valley.[16] That same year Ford made Young Mr. Lincoln and Drums Along the Mohawk, both with Henry Fonda.[17] The latter was Ford's first film shot in Technicolor.[18] In 1940 Ford made The Grapes of Wrath with Fonda and The Long Voyage Home with Wayne and Mitchell.[19] For the former film Ford received his second Academy Award for Best Director and the Best Supporting Actress for Jane Darwell.[20] He followed these films in 1941 with How Green Was My Valley, which won the Academy Award for Best Picture, brought Ford his third Academy Award for Best Director and the Best Supporting Actor Award to Donald Crisp.[21]

With the coming of World War II Ford was appointed to the OSS as a field photographer in the United States Navy.[3] During the war he made several documentaries. Two of these,The Battle of Midway and December 7th, won Academy Awards for, respectively, Best Documentary and Documentary Short Subject.[22][23] After being released from active duty he returned to Hollywood to make They Were Expendable (1945) a war drama of PT boats in the South Pacific.[24] He followed this with My Darling Clementine (1946), starring Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp.[25] In 1947, Ford reunited with Merian Cooper and began making films for their own company, Argosy Productions.[25] Over the next nine years they made Fort Apache, 3 Godfathers, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, Rio Grande, The Quiet Man, and The Searchers.[3] For The Quiet Man Ford won his fourth Academy Award for Best Director.[26] In 1949, Ford also made his only foray into live theatre by directing a charity production of What Price Glory?[27] After dissolving Argosy, Ford freelanced for the remainder of his career, directing occasionally for television and making several films including The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and the Civil War sequence of the Cinerama epic How the West Was Won (both 1962). Ford’s final film as a director was Chesty (1970), a documentary short about Marine Corps lieutenant general Lewis "Chesty" Puller.[28]

Ford is widely regarded as one of the most important and influential film-makers of his generation.[29] Ingmar Bergman called him the greatest movie director of all time and Orson Welles regarded him highly.[30] With four Academy Awards, he is the most honored director in movie history.[31] On February 8, 1960, Ford was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[32] On March 31, 1973, Ford was honored with the Medal of Freedom Award and became the first person honored with the AFI Life Achievement Award.[33] As of 2017 ten films directed or co-directed by Ford have been added to The National Film Registry: The Iron Horse, Stagecoach, Young Mr. Lincoln, The Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley, My Darling Clementine, The Quiet Man, The Searchers, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and How the West Was Won.[34] In 2012, The Searchers was ranked at number seven in Sight & Sound's listing of the 50 greatest films of all time.[35]

Films[edit]

The Iron Horse (1924) is an epic western about the building of the First Transcontinental Railroad.[36]
Four Sons (1928) features John Wayne in an early film appearance.[37]
Arrowsmith (1931) is a prestigious film made for Samuel Goldwyn.[38]
The Informer (1935) brought Ford his first Academy Award for Best Director.[39]
Steamboat Round the Bend (1935) is the last of three films Ford made with humorist Will Rogers.[40]
The Prisoner of Shark Island (1936) deals with the true story of Dr. Samuel Mudd.[41]
Stagecoach (1939) is Ford's first sound western and the film that made John Wayne a major star.[42]
Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) stars Henry Fonda in his first film for Ford.[43]
Drums Along the Mohawk (1939) is Ford's first film in Technicolor.[44]
The Grapes of Wrath (1940) brought Ford his second Academy Award for Best Director.[45]
How Green Was My Valley (1941) won the Academy Award for Best Picture and brought Ford his third Academy Award for Best Director.[46]
They Were Expendable (1945) was Ford's first film after service in the U.S. Navy during WWII.[47]
My Darling Clementine stars Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp.[48]
Fort Apache (1947) is the first film in Ford's "Cavalry trilogy".[49]
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), the second film in Ford's "Cavalry trilogy", was shot in Technicolor.[50]
Rio Grande (1950), the last film Ford's "Cavalry trilogy", marked the first teaming of John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara.[51]
The Quiet Man (1952) was filmed in Ireland and brought Ford his fourth Academy Award for Best Director.[52]
The Searchers ranks at number 7 in in Sight & Sound's listing of the 50 greatest films of all time.[35]
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) was one of Ford's last westerns.[53]

What follows is derived from the filmographies in Print the Legend: The Life and Times of John Ford by Scott Eyman and John Ford by Peter Bogdanovich.[54][55]

From 1917 to 1923 Ford was credited as "Jack Ford". Beginning with Cameo Kirby (1923) he was credited as "John Ford".[nb 1][57] Unless otherwise noted, all films released up until 1922 were Universal Productions. Films released from 1922 to 1930 were Fox Productions. After 1930 each film's production company is individually noted.[58]

All films are feature length unless identified as a serial or short film.[nb 2] The silent shorts are identified as one, two, or three reels in length.

Year Title Functioned as Notes Ref
Director Producer Actor Writer Other

1913 The Battle of Bull Run Yes Directed by and starring Francis Ford; two reels; survival status unknown. [60]
1914 Lucille Love, Girl of Mystery Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; John Ford: production assistant, propman, stunts; 15-episode serial; incomplete prints exist of four episodes. [58]
[61]
1914 The Mysterious Rose Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; two reels; survival status unknown. [62]
1914 The D.A.'s Brother Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; two reels; survival status unknown. [63]
1914 A Study in Scarlet Yes With Francis Ford as Sherlock Holmes and John Ford as Dr. Watson; two reels; lost [64]
1915 The Birth of a Nation Yes With Lillian Gish, Mae Marsh, Henry B. Walthall; Epoch Film Corp.; directed by D. W. Griffith; Ford claimed to have played one of the clansmen. [65]
1915 And They Called Him Hero Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; two reels; survival status unknown. [66]
1915 Three Bad Men and a Girl Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; two reels; survival status unknown. [67]
1915 The Hidden City Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; two reels; survival status unknown. [68]
1915 Smuggler's Island Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; two reels; lost. [69]
1915 The Doorway of Destruction Yes Yes With Francis Ford; two reels; John Ford: assistant director; lost. [70]
1915 The Broken Coin Yes Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; directed by Francis Ford; 22-chapter serial; John Ford: assistant director; lost. [71]
1915 The Campbells Are Coming Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; directed by Francis Ford; survival status unknown. [72]
1916 Strong-Arm Squad
(aka The Lumber Yard Gang)
Yes Directed by and starring Francis Ford; two reels; survival status unknown. [73]
1916 The Adventures of Peg o' the Ring Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; directed by Francis Ford; 15-chapter serial; lost. [74]
1916 Chicken Hearted Jim Yes Directed by and starring Francis Ford; one reel; survival status unknown. [75]
1916 A Bandit's Wager Yes With Grace Cunard, Francis Ford; directed by Francis Ford; included on Criterion DVD and blu-ray releases of My Darling Clementine. [76]
1917 The Tornado Yes Yes Yes With Jean Hathaway; two reels. Ford's directorial debut film; lost. [77]
1917 The Trail of Hate Yes Yes Two reels; lost. [78]
1917 The Scrapper Yes Yes Yes Two reels; lost. [79]
1917 The Soul Herder
(aka The Sky Pilot)
Yes With Harry Carey, Molly Malone, Hoot Gibson; three reels; lost; Ford's first film with Carey and Gibson. [80]
1917 Straight Shooting Yes With Harry Carey; Ford's debut feature film. [81]
1917 The Secret Man Yes With Harry Carey; two of the five reels survive. [82]
1917 A Marked Man Yes With Harry Carey, Molly Malone; lost. [83]
1917 Cheyenne's Pal Yes Yes With Harry Carey, Gertrude Astor, Hoot Gibson; two reels; lost. [84]
1917 Bucking Broadway Yes Yes With Harry Carey, Molly Malone; released as a bonus on the Criterion blu-ray of Stagecoach. [85]
1917 The Purple Mask Yes With Francis Ford, Grace Cunard; directed by Francis Ford; 16-chapter serial; John Ford supposedly acted in this; survives incomplete. [86]
1918 The Phantom Riders Yes With Harry Carey, Molly Malone; lost. [87]
1918 Wild Women Yes Yes With Harry Carey, Molly Malone; story by Ford and Carey; lost. [88]
1918 Thieves' Gold Yes With Harry Carey, Molly Malone; lost. [89]
1918 The Scarlet Drop Yes Yes With Harry Carey, Molly Malone; 30 minutes of footage survives. [90]
1918 Hell Bent Yes Yes With Harry Carey, Duke R. Lee; print survives in the George Eastman Museum. [91]
1918 A Woman's Fool Yes With Harry Carey, Betty Schade; lost. [92]
1918 The Craving Yes Directed by and featuring Francis Ford; John Ford: assistant director; prints survive. [93]
1918 Three Mounted Men Yes With Harry Carey; lost. [94]
1919 Roped Yes With Harry Carey, Neva Gerber; lost. [95]
1919 The Fighting Brothers Yes With Pete Morrison, Hoot Gibson; two reels; lost. [96]
1919 A Fight for Love Yes With Harry Carey; lost. [97]
1919 Rustlers Yes With Pete Morrison, Hoot Gibson; two reels; possibly directed by Reginald Barker; survival status unknown. [98]
1919 Bare Fists Yes With Harry Carey, Betty Schade; lost. [99]
1919 Gun Law Yes With Pete Morrison, Hoot Gibson; two reels; survival status unknown. [100]
1919 The Gun Packer Yes Yes With Pete Morrison, Hoot Gibson; two reels; story by Ford and Harry Carey; survival status unknown. [101]
1919 By Indian Post Yes With Pete Morrison, Duke R. Lee; two reels; survives incomplete. [102]
1919 Riders of Vengeance Yes Yes With Harry Carey, Seena Owen; lost. [103]
1919 The Last Outlaw Yes With Edgar Jones, Lucille Hutton; two reels; survives incomplete. [104]
1919 The Outcasts of Poker Flat Yes With Harry Carey, Cullen Landis; based on the short story by Bret Harte; lost. [105]
1919 Ace of the Saddle Yes With Harry Carey, Duke R. Lee; lost. [106]
1919 Rider of the Law Yes With Harry Carey, Vester Pegg; lost. [107]
1919 A Gun Fightin' Gentleman Yes Yes With Harry Carey, J. Barney Sherry; Partially lost – 3 reels survive. [108]
1919 Marked Men Yes With Harry Carey; remade by Ford as The Three Godfathers (1948)[nb 3]; lost. [109]
1920 The Prince of Avenue A Yes With James J. Corbett, Richard Cummings; Ford's first non-western film; lost. [110]
1920 The Girl in Number 29 Yes With Frank Mayo, Elinor Fair; lost. [111]
1920 Under Sentence Yes Directed by Edward O'Fearna (brother of John Ford); two reels; survival status unknown. [112]
1920 Hitchin' Posts Yes With Frank Mayo; lost. [113]
1920 Just Pals Yes Fox films; with Buck Jones, Helen Ferguson; Ford's first film for Fox; prints survive. [114]
1921 The Big Punch Yes Fox films; with Buck Jones, Barbara Bedford; lost. [115]
1921 The Freeze-Out Yes With Harry Carey, Helen Ferguson; lost. [116]
1921 The Wallop Yes With Harry Carey, Mignonne Golden; lost. [117]
1921 Desperate Trails Yes With Harry Carey, Irene Rich; lost. [118]
1921 Action Yes With Hoot Gibson, Francis Ford; lost. [119]
1921 Sure Fire Yes With Hoot Gibson, Molly Malone; lost. [120]
1921 Jackie Yes Fox films; with Shirley Mason, William Scott; lost. [121]
1922 Nero Yes Directed by J. Gordon Edwards; Ford worked as a 2nd unit director; lost. [122]
[123]
1922 Little Miss Smiles Yes With Shirley Mason, Gaston Glass; lost. [124]
1922 Silver Wings Yes With Mary Carr, Lynn Hammond; Ford directed the prologue only, the remainder of the film was directed by Edwin Carewe. [125]
[126]
1922 The Village Blacksmith Yes With Will Walling, Virginia True Boardman; only reel survives. [127]
1923 The Face on the Bar-Room Floor Yes With Henry B. Walthall, Ruth Clifford; based on the poem by Hugh Antoine d'Arcy[nb 4]; lost. [128]
1923 Three Jumps Ahead Yes Yes With Tom Mix, Alma Bennett; lost. [129]
1923 Cameo Kirby Yes With John Gilbert, Gertrude Olmstead; Ford's first film credited as "John Ford". [130]
1923 North of Hudson Bay Yes Yes With Tom Mix, Kathleen Key; Ford has a bit part in the film; 40 minutes of footage survive. [131]
1923 Hoodman Blind Yes With David Butler, Gladys Hulette; lost. [132]
1924 The Iron Horse Yes Yes With George O'Brien, Madge Bellamy; added to the National Film Registry in 2011. [36]
1924 Hearts of Oak Yes With Hobart Bosworth, Pauline Starke; lost. [133]
1925 Lightnin' Yes With Jay Hunt, Madge Bellamy, Wallace MacDonald.[nb 5] [134]
1925 Kentucky Pride Yes With Henry B. Walthall, Gertrude Astor. [135]
1925 Thank You Yes With Alec B. Francis, Jacqueline Logan, George O'Brien; lost. [136]
1925 The Fighting Heart Yes With George O'Brien, Billie Dove; lost. [137]
1926 The Shamrock Handicap Yes With Janet Gaynor, Leslie Fenton, J. Farrell MacDonald; print survives at the Museum of Modern Art. [138]
1926 3 Bad Men Yes Yes With George O'Brien, Olive Borden. [139]
1926 The Blue Eagle Yes With George O'Brien, Janet Gaynor; one reel missing. [140]
1927 Upstream Yes With Nancy Nash, Earle Foxe; Once lost, but rediscovered in New Zealand. [141]
1927 7th Heaven Yes Directed by Frank Borzage; with Janet Gaynor, Charles Farrell; Ford was 2nd unit director. [142]
1927 What Price Glory? Yes Directed by Raoul Walsh; with Victor McLaglen, Edmund Lowe, Dolores del Rio; Ford was 2nd unit director. [142]
1928 Mother Machree Yes With Belle Bennett, Neil Hamilton, Victor McLaglen; Movietone sound (music and sound effects only); John Wayne's first film with Ford, albeit in an uncredited minor role; Wayne was also a prop man in this film; three reels survive. [143]
1928 Four Sons Yes With Margaret Mann, James Hall; Movietone sound (music, limited dialogue, and sound effects only); John Wayne in uncredited minor role. [37]
1928 Hangman's House Yes With Victor McLaglen, June Collyer; silent film; John Wayne in uncredited minor role. [144]
1928 Napoleon's Barber Yes With Otto Matieson, Natalie Golitzen; Short film; Ford's first all-talkie film; lost. [145]
1928 Riley the Cop Yes With J. Farrell MacDonald, Louise Fazenda; Silent film with synchronized music track. [146]
1929 Strong Boy Yes With Victor McLaglen, Leatrice Joy; Silent film with synchronized music track; Believed lost although a print may exist in Australia. [147]
1929 The Black Watch Yes With Victor McLaglen, Myrna Loy; Ford's first all-talkie feature.[nb 6] [148]
1929 Salute Yes With George O'Brien, Helen Chandler; Ward Bond (in his film debut) and John Wayne have uncredited roles. [149]
1929 Big Time Yes Directed by Kenneth Hawks; with Lee Tracy, Mae Clarke, Stepin Fetchit; Ford appears as himself. [150]
1930 Men Without Women Yes Yes With Kenneth MacKenna, Frank Albertson; John Wayne has an unbilled bit part; all-talkie film that "survives only in a bastardized version that replaces most of the dialogue with titles". [151]
1930 Born Reckless Yes With Edmund Lowe, Catherine Dale Owen. [152]
1930 Up the River Yes Yes With Spencer Tracy, Humphrey Bogart (both in their film debuts).[nb 7] [153]
1930 Seas Beneath Yes With George O'Brien, Marion Lessing. [154]
1931 The Brat Yes Fox; with Sally O'Neil, Alan Dinehart.[nb 8] [155]
1931 Arrowsmith Yes Goldwyn-United Artists; with Ronald Colman, Helen Hayes, Myrna Loy; United Artists; based on the novel by Booth Tarkington; nominated – Academy Award for Best Picture. [38]
1932 Air Mail Yes Universal; with Ralph Bellamy, Gloria Stuart, Pat O'Brien. [156]
1932 Flesh Yes MGM; with Wallace Beery, Karen Morley, Ricardo Cortez. [157]
1933 Pilgrimage Yes Fox; with Henrietta Crosman, Heather Angel. [158]
1933 Doctor Bull Yes Fox; with Will Rogers, Marian Nixon. [159]
1934 The Lost Patrol Yes RKO Pictures; with Victor McLaglen, Boris Karloff.[nb 9] [160]
1934 The World Moves On Yes Fox; with Madeleine Carroll, Franchot Tone. [161]
1934 Judge Priest Yes Fox; with Will Rogers, Tom Brown, Anita Louise, Henry B. Walthall. [162]
1935 The Whole Town's Talking Yes Columbia; with Edward G. Robinson, Jean Arthur. [163]
1935 The Informer Yes RKO Pictures; with Victor McLaglen, Heather Angel; based on the novel by Liam O'Flaherty, Academy Award for Best Director; Nominated – Best Picture.[nb 10] [39]
1935 Steamboat Round the Bend Yes 20th Century Fox;[nb 11] with Will Rogers, Anne Shirley; Rogers' last film.[nb 12] [40]
1936 The Prisoner of Shark Island Yes 20th Century Fox; with Warner Baxter, Gloria Stuart. [41]
1936 The Last Outlaw Yes RKO Pictures; directed by Christy Cabanne; with Harry Carey, Hoot Gibson; based on an original story by Ford. [165]
1936 Mary of Scotland Yes RKO Pictures; with Katharine Hepburn, Fredric March. [166]
1936 The Plough and the Stars Yes RKO Pictures; with Barbara Stanwyck, Preston Foster. [167]
1937 Wee Willie Winkie Yes 20th Century Fox; with Shirley Temple, Victor McLaglen; originally release in sepiatone. [168]
1937 The Hurricane Yes Goldwyn-United Artists; with Dorothy Lamour, Jon Hall. [169]
1938 The Adventures of Marco Polo Yes Goldwyn-United Artists; directed by Archie Mayo; with Gary Cooper, Sigrid Gurie, Basil Rathbone; Ford directed some of the film's action sequences. [170]
1938 Four Men and a Prayer Yes 20th Century Fox; with Loretta Young, Richard Greene, David Niven. [171]
1938 Submarine Patrol Yes 20th Century Fox; with Richard Greene, Nancy Kelly. [172]
1939 Stagecoach Yes Yes Wanger-United Artists; with Claire Trevor, John Wayne; Ford's first sound Western and his first film shot in Monument Valley; nominated – Best Picture; nominated – Academy Award for Best Director.[nb 13]; added to the National Film Registry in 1995. [42]
1939 Young Mr. Lincoln Yes 20th Century Fox; with Henry Fonda; added to the National Film Registry in 2003. [43]
1939 Drums Along the Mohawk Yes 20th Century Fox; with Claudette Colbert, Henry Fonda, Edna May Oliver;[nb 14] based on the novel by Walter D. Edmonds; Ford's first film in color (Technicolor). [44]
1940 The Grapes of Wrath Yes 20th Century Fox; with Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell; based on the novel by John Steinbeck; Ford won an Academy Award for Best Director and Darwell won Best Supporting Actress;[nb 15] added to the National Film Registry in 1989. [45]
1940 The Long Voyage Home Yes Yes Argosy-United Artists; with John Wayne, Thomas Mitchell; based on four one-act plays by Eugene O'Neill; Ford's first production made by his company, Argosy Productions.[nb 16] [173]
1941 Tobacco Road Yes 20th Century Fox; With Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews; based on the play by Jack Kirkland and the novel by Erskine Caldwell [174]
1942 Sex Hygiene Yes U.S. Army Signal Corps; 30-minute training film. [175]
1941 How Green Was My Valley Yes Yes 20th Century Fox; with Walter Pidgeon, Maureen O'Hara, Donald Crisp, Roddy McDowell; based on the novel by Richard Llewellyn; Best Picture; Ford won an Academy Award for Best Director.[nb 17] [46]
1942 The Battle of Midway Yes Yes War Activities Committee; with Donald Crisp, Henry Fonda; filmed in color; won the Academy Award for Documentary Feature. [175]
1942 Torpedo Squadron Yes Documentary short for the United States Navy; filmed in color. [175]
1943 December 7th Yes Documentary short for the United States Navy; co-directed by Lt. Gregg Toland, USNR; won the Academy Award for Documentary Short Subject [175]
[176]
1943 We Sail at Midnight Yes Documentary short for the United States Navy. [177]
1943 How to Operate Behind Enemy Lines Yes Yes Ford appears in this training film for the OSS. [178]
1943 Show Business at War Yes Ford is shown working with the OSS in this wartime documentary short. [179]
1945 They Were Expendable Yes Yes MGM; with Robert Montgomery, John Wayne, Donna Reed; nominated for two Academy AwardsBest Visual Effects (A. Arnold Gillespie, Donald Jahraus, Robert A. MacDonald, Michael Steinoreand), Best Sound Recording (Douglas Shearer). [47]
1946 My Darling Clementine Yes 20th Century Fox, with Henry Fonda, Linda Darnell, Victor Mature; filmed in Monument Valley; added to the National Film Registry in 1991. [48]
1947 The Fugitive Yes Yes Argosy-RKO Pictures; with Henry Fonda, Dolores del Río. [180]
1948 Fort Apache Yes Yes Argosy-RKO Pictures; with John Wayne, Henry Fonda, Shirley Temple, John Agar; suggested by the short story "Massacre" by James Warner Bellah; the first film in Ford's "Cavalry trilogy"; filmed in Monument Valley. [49]
1948 3 Godfathers Yes Yes Argosy-MGM; With John Wayne, Pedro Armendariz, Jr., Harry Carey Jr.; filmed in Technicolor; based on the novel by Peter B. Kyne; filmed on location in Death Valley; a remake of Ford's Marked Men. [181]
1949 Mighty Joe Young Yes Argosy-RKO Pictures; directed by Ernest B. Schoedsack; with Terry Moore, Ben Johnson, Robert Armstrong; special effects by Willis H. O'Brien and Ray Harryhausen. [182]
1949 She Wore a Yellow Ribbon Yes Yes Argosy-RKO Pictures; with John Wayne, Joanne Dru, John Agar; filmed in Technicolor; based on the short stories "The Big Hunt" and "War Party" by James Warner Bellah; film on location in Monument Valley; the second film in Ford's "Cavalry trilogy".[nb 18] [50]
1949 Pinky Yes 20th Century Fox; directed by Elia Kazan; with Jeanne Crain, Ethel Barrymore; Ford was the original director but, due to illness, was replaced after one week by Kazan. [183]
1950 When Willie Comes Marching Home Yes 20th Century Fox; with Dan Dailey, Corinne Calvet. [184]
1950 Wagon Master Yes Yes Yes Argosy-RKO Pictures; with Ben Johnson, Joanne Dru, Harry Carey Jr.; filmed on location in Moab, Utah. [185]
1950 Rio Grande Yes Yes Argosy-Republic Pictures; with John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, Claude Jarman, Jr.; based on the short story "Mission with No Record" by James Warner Bellah; filmed on location in Moab, Utah; the final film in Ford's "Cavalry trilogy". [51]
1951 The Bullfighter and the Lady Yes Republic Pictures; produced by John Wayne; directed by Budd Boetticher; with Robert Stack, Gilbert Roland; Ford edited this film as a favor to Wayne.[nb 19] [186]
1951 This is Korea! Yes U.S. Navy-Republic Pictures; filmed in color; documentary about the United States Navy and Marines during the Korean War. [187]
1952 What Price Glory Yes 20th Century Fox; with James Cagney, Corinne Calvet, Dan Dailey; filmed in Technicolor; a remake of Raoul Walsh's 1926 film. [188]
1952 The Quiet Man Yes Yes Argosy-Republic Pictures; with John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara; filmed in Technicolor on location in Ireland; based on the short story by Maurice Walsh; Ford won an Academy Award for Best Director while Winton Hoch and Archie Stout won for Best Cinematography; added to the National Film Registry in 2013.[nb 20] [52]
1953 The Sun Shines Bright Yes Argosy-Republic Pictures; with Charles Winninger, Arleen Whelan. [189]
1953 Mogambo Yes MGM; with Clark Gable, Ava Gardner, Grace Kelly; filmed in Technicolor on location in Africa; based on the play Red Dust by Wilson Collison.[nb 21] [190]
1953 Hondo Yes Wayne-Fellows-Warner Bros.; directed by John Farrow; with John Wayne, Geraldine Page; filmed in 3-D and Warnercolor; based on the short story "The Gift of Cochise" by Louis L'Amour; Ford did some uncredited second-unit work. [191]
1955 The Long Gray Line Yes Columbia Pictures; with Tyrone Power, Maureen O'Hara; filmed in CinemaScope and Technicolor. [192]
1955 The Red, White, and Blue Line Yes A 10-minute film in CinemaScope and Technicolor promoting Americans to by savings bonds. Filmed on the set of The Long Gray Line. [193]
1955 Mister Roberts Yes Warner Bros.; with Henry Fonda, James Cagney, Jack Lemmon; based on the play by Thomas Heggen and Joshua Logan; filmed in CinemaScope and Warnercolor; Ford was replaced by Mervyn LeRoy during production; Lemmon won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. [194]
1956 The Searchers Yes Yes C. V. Whitney Pictures-Warner Bros.; with John Wayne, Jeffrey Hunter, Vera Miles; based on the novel by Alan Le May; filmed in VistaVision and Technicolor on location in Monument Valley; added to the National Film Registry in 1989; ranked at number seven in Sight & Sound's listing of the 50 greatest films of all time in 2012. [35]
[195]
1957 The Wings of Eagles Yes MGM; with John Wayne, Dan Dailey, Maureen O'Hara; filmed in Metrocolor. [196]
1957 The Growler Story Yes A short film in color for the U.S. Dept. of Defense about the USS Growler. [197]
1957 The Rising of the Moon Yes Warner Bros.; with Tyrone Power introducing three stories set in Ireland: "1921", "A Minute's Wait", and "The Majesty of the Law". [198]
1958 So Alone Yes Free Cinema-BFI; with John Qualen; 8-minute short film. [199]
1958 The Last Hurrah Yes Yes Columbia Pictures; with Spencer Tracy, Jeffrey Hunter.[nb 22] [200]
1958 Gideon's Day
(US title: Gideon of Scotland Yard)
Yes Columbia Pictures; with Jack Hawkins; made in England; filmed in Technicolor but originally released in the United States only in black and white. [201]
1959 Korea Yes A short film in color for the U.S. Dept. of Defense. [202]
1959 The Horse Soldiers Yes Mirisch-Batjac-United Artists; with John Wayne, William Holden, Constance Towers; filmed in Deluxe Color [203]
1960 Sergeant Rutledge Yes Warner Bros.; With Jeffrey Hunter, Constance Towers, Woody Strode; filmed in Technicolor on location in Monument Valley. [204]
1960 The Alamo Yes Batjac-United Artists; produced and directed by John Wayne; with John Wayne, Richard Widmark, Laurence Harvey; Ford did some second unit work. [205]
1961 Two Rode Together Yes Yes Columbia Pictures; with James Stewart, Richard Widmark, Shirley Jones; filmed in Eastmancolor. [206]
1962 The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance Yes Paramount Pictures; with John Wayne, James Stewart, Vera Miles, Woody Strode; based on the short story by Dorothy M. Johnson; added to the National Film Registry in 2007. [53]
1962 How the West Was Won Yes MGM; with (in the Ford segment) John Wayne, George Peppard; filmed in Cinerama and Technicolor; Ford directed the Civil War segment while Henry Hathaway and George Marshall directed the film's other segments; added to the National Film Registry in 1997. [207]
1963 Donovan's Reef Yes Yes Paramount Pictures;with John Wayne, Elizabeth Allen, Lee Marvin; filmed in Technicolor; Wayne's final acting performance in a Ford film. [208]
1964 Cheyenne Autumn Yes Warner Bros.; with Richard Widmark, Carroll Baker, James Stewart; filmed in Super Panavision 70 and Technicolor on location in Monument Valley [209]
1965 Young Cassidy Yes MGM; directed with Jack Cardiff; with Rod Taylor, Julie Christie; Ford began directing the film but was replaced during production by Cardiff, who received credit in the final print. [210]
1966 7 Women Yes MGM; with Anne Bancroft, Sue Lyon, Margaret Leighton; filmed in Panavision and Metrocolor. [211]
1970 Chesty: A Tribute to a Legend Yes Documentary for the United States Marine Corp about General Lewis B. 'Chesty' Puller; narrated by John Wayne [212]
1971 Vietnam! Vietnam! Yes Documentary for the United States Information Agency; narrated by Charlton Heston. [213]
1971 Directed by John Ford Yes Documentary directed by Peter Bogdanovich; narrated by Orson Welles; Ford was among the people interviewed. [214]
1971 John Ford: Memorial Day 1971 Yes Documentary short featuring Ford. [215]

Radio[edit]

Year Program title Episode title Notes Ref
1949 NBC Theater "Stagecoach" Aired: January 9 on NBC; John Wayne and Claire Trevor reprised their roles from the 1939 film. Ford appeared in a brief introduction. [216]
1949 Screen Directors Playhouse "Fort Apache" Aired: August 5 on NBC; John Wayne starred while Ford did a brief introduction. [216]
1950 The Rex Allen and Phillips 66 Show N/A Ford appeared in a skit with singing cowboy star Rex Allen. [216]
1962 The Unreal West N/A Aired: July 25 on CBC; Ford and John Wayne were among the people interviewed for this documentary series hosted by film historian Tony Thomas. [216]

Television[edit]

Year Program title Episode title Notes Ref
1955 Fireside Theatre "The Bamboo Cross" Aired: December 6 on NBC; with Jane Wyman; directed by Ford. [217]
1955 Screen Directors Playhouse "Rookie of the Year" Aired: December 7 on NBC; with John Wayne, Ward Bond, Patrick Wayne; directed by Ford. [217]
1957 This Is Your Life "This Is Your Life, Maureen O'Hara" NBC; Ford was one of the guests. [218]
1958 Wide Wide World "The Western" Aired June 8 on NBC; documentary series hosted by Dave Garroway; reputedly this episode was directed by Ford. [219]
1960 Wagon Train "The Colter Craven Story" Aired November 23 on NBC; with Ward Bond, Robert Horton; directed by Ford.[nb 23] [221]
1962 Alcoa Premiere "Flashing Spikes" Aired October 3 on ABC; with James Stewart, Jack Warden, Patrick Wayne; directed by Ford. [222]
1966 Cineaestes de Norte Tempes
("Filmmakers of Our Times")
"Interview with John Ford" Aired: June 6 on ORTF (Paris); interview with Ford in Hollywood on August 31, 1965. [222]
1968 Omnibus "My Name is John Ford, I Make Westerns" Aired: August on BBC; interview with Ford made in June 1968. [223]
1971 The American West of John Ford N/A Documentary about Ford's western films; co-produced by his grandson, Dan Ford. [224]
1993 The American Film Institute Salute to John Ford N/A Ford was the first recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award. [33]

Stage[edit]

Year Title Notes Ref
1949 What Price Glory? Ford directed this benefit performance for the Purple Heart Association. The cast included Ward Bond, Pat O'Brien, and Maureen O'Hara. [27]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Ford's real name was John Martin Feeney. He was commonly known as Jack. His older brother, Francis Feeney, took the professional name of "Francis Ford" when he became an actor as it sounded more professional and less ethnic. When Jack entered films he took on the last name of Ford as well. With Cameo Kirby he altered his name to "John Ford" as it sounded more dignified.[56]
  2. ^ According to the rules of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, a feature-length motion picture has a running time of more than 40 minutes.[59]
  3. ^ Other screen adaptations of Kyne's story include a 1916 Bluebird film directed by Edward LeSaint and starring Harry Carey, Hell's Heroes (1930), directed by William Wyler and starring Charles Bickford, Three Godfathers (1936) directed by Richard Boleslawski and starring Chester Morris, and a TV movie, The Godchild (1974), directed by John Badham and starring Jack Palance.
  4. ^ Charlie Chaplin made a one-reel version of this poem in 1914.
  5. ^ Remade in 1930 with Will Rogers starring and David Butler directing.[134]
  6. ^ Remade in 1954 as King of the Khyber Rifles, directed by Henry King and starring Tyrone Power.[148]
  7. ^ The TCM website states that Up the River was Humphrey Bogart's second film.
  8. ^ Previously filmed as The Brat (1919), directed by Herbert Blaché and starring Alla Nazimova, remade as Girl from Avenue A (1940).[155]
  9. ^ Previously filmed in 1929 with Cyril McLaglen in the role played by his brother, Victor McLaglen, in the Ford version.[160]
  10. ^ The Informer also won Academy Awards for Best Actor (Victor McLaglen), Best Screenplay (Dudley Nichols), and Best Music Score (Max Steiner). The Informer had been previously filmed in 1929, directed by Arthur Robison and starring Lars Hanson.[39]
  11. ^ During production of Steamboat Round the Bend Fox Films merged with Darryl F. Zanuck's Twentieth Century Pictures to form 20th Century Fox.[164]
  12. ^ Steamboat Round the Bend was released after Rogers' death in a airplane crash. Although it was the last film that Rogers made, a film he made prior to it, In Old Kentucky, was released later.[40]
  13. ^ Thomas Mitchell also received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, and Richard Hageman, Franke Harling, John Leipold and Leo Shuken received an Academy Award for Best Original Score. Stagecoach was remade in 1966, directed by Gordon Douglas, and for TV in 1986, directed by Ted Post.[42]
  14. ^ Edna May Oliver received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress.[44]
  15. ^ Also nominated for Academy Awards: Best Actor (Henry Fonda), Editing (Robert Simpson), Sound Editing (E. H. Hansen), Writing (Nunnally Johnson, and Outstanding Production[45]
  16. ^ The Long Voyage Home was nominated for the following Academy Awards: Black and White Cinematography (Gregg Toland), Film Editing (Sherman Todd), Original Score (Richard Hageman), Special Effects (R.T. Layton, R.O. Binger, Thomas T. Moulton), Best Screenplay (Dudley Nichols), and Outstanding Production.[173]
  17. ^ How Green Was My Valley also won Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor (Donald Crisp), Art Direction (black and white) (Richard Day, Nathan Juran, Thomas Little), and Best Cinematography (Arthur Miller)[46]
  18. ^ Cinematographer Winton Hoch attempted to duplicate the style of Frederic Remington's western paintings in their screen images. Hoch won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography (Color).[50]
  19. ^ Ford edited about 40 minutes out of Boetticher's original cut. In 1986, Boetticher's cut was restored.[186]
  20. ^ The Quiet Man also received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Screenplay (Frank S. Nugent), Best Sound Recording (Daniel J. Bloomberg), Best Art Direction (Frank Hotaling; John McCarthy, Jr., Charles S. Thompson), and Best Supporting Actor (Victor McLaglen).[52]
  21. ^ Clark Gable starred in Red Dust (1932), directed by Victor Fleming. This is an earlier film version of Mogambo.[190]
  22. ^ Remade as a 1977 television film of the same name, starring Carroll O'Connor and directed by Vincent Sherman.[200]
  23. ^ Ward Bond died of a heart attack shortly before this episode aired.[220]
Footnotes
  1. ^ Eyman, pp. 543-551.
  2. ^ Eyman, pp. 15, 30.
  3. ^ a b c d Katz, p. 471.
  4. ^ Eyman, pp. 42-46.
  5. ^ Bogdanovich, p. 116.
  6. ^ Eyman, p. 53.
  7. ^ Bogdanovich, pp. 120-121.
  8. ^ Bogdanovich, p. 122.
  9. ^ Eyman, p. 97.
  10. ^ Bogdanovich, pp. 123.
  11. ^ Eyman, p. 114.
  12. ^ Eyman, p. 126.
  13. ^ "The 8th Academy Awards". Academy Awards. Retrieved July 14, 2017. 
  14. ^ Eyman, pp. 173-190.
  15. ^ "The 12th Academy Awards". Academy Awards. Retrieved July 14, 2017. 
  16. ^ Bogdanovich, pp. 169-172.
  17. ^ Eyman, pp. 192-196.
  18. ^ Bogdanovich, pp. 74-75.
  19. ^ Eyman, pp. 196-207.
  20. ^ "The 13th Academy Awards". Academy Awards. Retrieved July 14, 2017. 
  21. ^ "The 14th Academy Awards". Academy Awards. Retrieved July 14, 2017. 
  22. ^ "The 15th Academy Awards". Academy Awards. Retrieved July 15, 2017. 
  23. ^ "The 16th Academy Awards". Academy Awards. Retrieved July 15, 2017. 
  24. ^ Eyman, pp. 248-267.
  25. ^ a b Bogdanovich, p. 133.
  26. ^ "The 25th Academy Awards". Academy Awards. Retrieved July 14, 2017. 
  27. ^ a b Eyman, pp. 336-340.
  28. ^ Eyman, pp. 509-510.
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