KKWF

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KKWF
Kkwf1007TheWolf.png
City Seattle, Washington
Broadcast area Seattle metropolitan area
Branding 100.7 The Wolf
Slogan "#1 For New Country"
Frequency 100.7 MHz FM (also on HD Radio)
First air date 1948 (as KIRO-FM)
Format Analog/HD1: Country
HD2: Blues
ERP 68,000 watts
HAAT 707 meters (2,320 ft)
Class C
Facility ID 6367
Transmitter coordinates 47°30′14″N 121°58′34″W / 47.504°N 121.976°W / 47.504; -121.976Coordinates: 47°30′14″N 121°58′34″W / 47.504°N 121.976°W / 47.504; -121.976
Callsign meaning K K The WolF
Former callsigns KIRO-FM (1948-1974)
KSEA (1974-1991)
KWMX (1991-1992)
KIRO-FM (1992-1999)
KQBZ (1999-2005)
Owner Entercom Communications
(Entercom License, LLC)
Sister stations KISW, KHTP, KNDD
Webcast Listen Live
Website seattlewolf.com

KKWF (100.7 FM), known as "100.7 The Wolf", is an American radio station based in Seattle, Washington. The Entercom outlet broadcasts a country music format at 100.7 MHz with an effective radiated power of 68,000 watts. Its transmitter is located near Issaquah on Tiger Mountain, and operates from its studios at the Metropolitan Park complex in Downtown Seattle.

History[edit]

KKWF started broadcasting in 1948 as KIRO-FM with a full service format. The station flipped to AOR in 1967. The station flipped to Beautiful music in 1971, first as KIRO-FM, and then as KSEA in 1974. The format gradually evolved to easy listening (as "Easy 101") in the early 1980s, and then to soft adult contemporary in the mid-1980s. The station shifted to hot adult contemporary as KWMX ("Mix 101") in 1991; this would last for a short time.[1]

On September 21, 1992, the station flipped to a simulcast of then-sister station KIRO; with the change, the KIRO-FM call letters would return.[2] The station broke the simulcast and began broadcasting original programming on July 5, 1994, and retained the KIRO-FM calls. The initial lineup included a simulcast of the AM's morning show in morning drive (which would be replaced by local comedian Pat Cashman in September), Rick Enloe in late mornings (who would later be replaced by Amy Alpine), Dave Brenner and Dr. Laura Schlessinger in afternoons, Gil Gross (syndicated from San Francisco) in evenings, Leslie Marshall at night (who would later be replaced by Jim Bohannon), and Bernie Ward and David Essel on weekends.[3] On January 6, 1995, the station rebranded as "100.7 The Buzz", and added Tom Leykis to the lineup.[4] The station changed its call letters to KQBZ in May 1999, and shifted to hot talk in 2000 with the slogan "Radio For Guys." During the early 2000s, KQBZ carried Don & Mike in middays and Phil Hendrie in evenings.[5] By November 2005, the station's weekday lineup consisted of local personalities Robin & Maynard (who were previously on KZOK-FM) in mornings, BJ Shea in middays, Tom Leykis in afternoons, The Men's Room in evenings, and John and Jeff and All-Comedy Radio in overnights, with paid and specialty programming on weekends.[6]

At 8 AM on November 30, 2005, in the middle of "Robin & Maynard", the station began stunting with a countdown clock to Noon the same day. At that time, the station flipped to country as "100.7 The Wolf" with the new call letters KKWF.[7] The first song played on The Wolf was "How Do You Like Me Now?!" by Toby Keith.[8] With the flip, The Men's Room and BJ Shea moved over to sister station KISW; Tom Leykis would move over as well, but on tape delay, from 11 PM to 2 AM.

The Wolf is one of two country outlets targeting the Puget Sound region; KMPS is the other.

HD radio[edit]

KKWF signed on HD Radio operations in 2006. 100.7 HD 2 carried an all comedy format simply branded as "All Comedy Radio", which used to air overnights when the station was KQBZ. On June 18, 2011, the signal flipped to Smooth Jazz, filling the void left open by KWJZ when that station flipped to modern AC on December 27, 2010. In late February 2012, the blues format from sister station 103.7 HD2 was bumped to 100.7 HD2, effectively ending the smooth jazz format.[9]

External links[edit]

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