Legislative Assembly of El Salvador

Coordinates: 13°42′22″N 89°11′58″W / 13.70611°N 89.19944°W / 13.70611; -89.19944
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Legislative Assembly of the Republic of El Salvador

Asamblea Legislativa de la República de El Salvador
Type
Type
History
Founded1824[1]
Leadership
Ernesto Castro (Nuevas Ideas)
since 1 May 2021
First Vice President
Suecy Callejas (Nuevas Ideas)
since 1 May 2021
Second Vice President
Rodrigo Ayala (Nuevas Ideas)
since 1 May 2021
Third Vice President
Guillermo Gallegos (GANA)
since 1 May 2021
Structure
Seats84 deputies
Political groups
Government: (67)
  •   Nuevas Ideas (56)
  •   GANA (5)
  •   PCN (2)
  •   PDC (1)
  •   Independent (3)

Opposition: (17)

Elections
Last election
4 February 2024
Next election
2027
Motto
Puesta Nuestra Fe En Dios (English: We Put Our Faith In God)
Meeting place
Blue Hall, San Salvador
Website
www.asamblea.gob.sv

The Legislative Assembly (Spanish: Asamblea Legislativa) is the legislative branch of the government of El Salvador.

History[edit]

The organization was founded in 1824 as the Central American Congress (Spanish: Congreso Federal Centroamericano).[1]

Structure[edit]

Blue Room of the Legislative Assembly of El Salvador.

The Salvadoran legislature is a unicameral body. It is made up of 84 deputies, all of whom are elected by direct popular vote according to open-list proportional representation to serve three-year terms and are eligible for immediate re-election. Of these, 64 are elected in 14 multi-seat constituencies, corresponding to the country's 14 departments, which return between 3 and 16 deputies each. The remaining 20 deputies are selected on the basis of a single national constituency.

To be eligible for election to the Assembly, candidates must be (Art. 126, Constitution):

  • over 25;
  • Salvadoran citizens by birth, born of at least one parent to be a Salvadoran citizen;
  • of recognised honesty and education, and
  • have not had the privilege of one's rights as a citizen cancelled in the previous five years.

On 1 June 2023, Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele issued a proposal to the Legislative Assembly to reduce the number of its seats from 84 to 60.[2] The proposal was passed by the Legislative Assembly on 7 June 2023 and it will go into effect on 1 May 2024.[3]

Current standing by party[edit]

Party / Group Deputies
Nuevas Ideas (NI) 56
Nationalist Republican Alliance (ARENA) 11
Grand Alliance for National Unity (GANA) 5
Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) 4
National Coalition Party (PCN) 2
Nuestro Tiempo (NT) 1
Vamos (V) 1
Christian Democratic Party (PDC) 1
Independent 3
Source: Salvadoran Legislative Assembly

Current leadership[edit]

Office Holder Political affiliation Department Term
President Ernesto Castro Nuevas Ideas San Salvador 2021–2024
First Vice President Suecy Callejas Nuevas Ideas San Salvador 2021–2024
Second Vice President Rodrigo Ayala Nuevas Ideas San Salvador 2021–2024
Third Vice President Guillermo Gallegos Grand Alliance for National Unity San Salvador 2021–2024
First Secretary Elisa Rosales Nuevas Ideas San Salvador 2021–2024
Second Secretary Numan Salgado Grand Alliance for National Unity San Miguel 2021–2024
Third Secretary Serafín Orantes National Coalition Party Ahuachapán 2021–2022
Reynaldo Cardoza National Coalition Party Chalatenango 2022–2024
Fourth Secretary Reinaldo Carballo Christian Democratic Party San Miguel 2021–2024

Election results[edit]

Results[edit]

PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Nuevas Ideas2,200,33270.5654–2
Nationalist Republican Alliance227,3577.292–12
Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front195,9206.280–4
National Coalition Party101,6413.262
Grand Alliance for National Unity99,3443.190–5
Christian Democratic Party93,1082.991
Vamos91,6752.941
Solidary Force51,0211.640New
Nuestro Tiempo41,0601.320–1
Democratic Change12,1650.390
PDCPCN4,9130.160
Total3,118,536100.0060–24
Valid votes3,118,53696.46
Invalid votes74,1462.29
Blank votes40,2081.24
Total votes3,232,890100.00
Registered voters/turnout6,214,39952.02
Source: TSE

Other parliamentary bodies[edit]

El Salvador also returns 20 deputies to the supranational Central American Parliament, also elected according to closed-list proportional representation from a single national constituency.

Members of the Legislative Assembly[edit]

Members of the Legislative Assembly 1928–present
Key to parties
Election Distribution
1928
42
1932 Election canceled
1936
42
1939
42
1944
42
1950
14 38
1952
54
1954
54
1956
54
1958
54
1960
54
1961
54
1964
14 6 32
1968
19 2 4 27
1970
16 1 1 34
1972
8 1 4 39
1974
15 1 36
1976
52
1978
4 50
1982
24 1 2 14 19
1985
33 1 1 12 13
1988
22 7 31
1991
22 1 1 8 9 39
1994
21 18 1 1 4 39
1997
27 10 1 2 2 3 11 28
2000
31 10 3 2 13 29
2003
31 5 5 16 27
2006
32 6 2 10 34
2009
35 5 1 11 32
2012
31 1 1 7 11 33
2015
31 1 6 11 35
2018
23 2 1 1 9 10 37
2021
4 1 1 56 2 5 1 14
2024
1 54 2 1 2

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Breve historia de la Asamblea Legislativa de la República de El Salvador" (PDF). Retrieved 19 August 2023.
  2. ^ Velásquez, Eugenia (1 June 2023). "En Vivo: En su Discurso del Cuarto Año de Gobierno Bukele Presenta Propuesta para Reducir de 262 a 44 Municipios y Diputados a 60" [Live: In His Speech of Four Years of Government Bukele Presents Proposal to Reduce from 262 to 44 Municipalities and Deputies to 60]. El Salvador.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 1 June 2023.
  3. ^ Renteria, Nelson; Madry, Kylie (7 June 2023). Berkrot, Bill (ed.). "El Salvador Slashes Size of Congress Ahead of Elections". Reuters. San Salvador, El Salvador. Retrieved 7 June 2023.

External links[edit]

13°42′22″N 89°11′58″W / 13.70611°N 89.19944°W / 13.70611; -89.19944