Meclofenoxate

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Meclofenoxate
Centrophenoxine.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
2-Dimethylaminoethyl (4-chlorophenoxy)acetate
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Identifiers
CAS Number 51-68-3 YesY
ATC code N06BX01 (WHO)
PubChem CID 4039
ChemSpider 3899 N
UNII C76QQ2I0RG YesY
KEGG D00993 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C12H16ClNO3
Molar mass 257.713
 NYesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Meclofenoxate (INN, BAN) (brand name Lucidril), also known as centrophenoxine, is a cholinergic nootropic used as a dietary supplement and drug in the treatment of symptoms of senile dementia and Alzheimer's disease.[1][2][3] It is an ester of dimethylethanolamine (DMAE) and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (pCPA). DMAE is a natural substance, found especially in fish, while pCPA is a synthetic compound that resembles a variety of plant hormones called auxins.

In elderly patients, meclofenoxate has been found clinically to improve memory, have a mentally stimulating effect, and improve general cognition.[4] Meclofenoxate also increases cellular membrane phospholipids.[citation needed] Although meclofenoxate is generally considered to be a dietary supplement, in some Europeean countries, such as Germany, Hungary, and Austria, as well as Japan, it is a prescription drug.[3]

Side effects[edit]

Meclofenoxate is considered to be very safe and high in tolerability.[3] However, possible side effects may include, rarely, insomnia, dizziness, restlessness, muscle tremor, depression, nausea, muscle tension, and headache; these side effects may due to overdosage, and may indicate the need for the dosage to be reduced.[3]

Research[edit]

Meclofenoxate, as well as DMAE, have been found to increase the lifespans of mice by 30–50%, and thus may be anti-aging drugs/supplements.[5]

Brand names[edit]

In addition to Lucidril, meclofenoxate has also been marketed under the brand names Amipolen, Analux, Brenal, Cellative, Centrophenoxin, Cerebron, Cerutil, Closete, Helfergin, Lucidryl, Lutiaron, Marucotol, Proserout, Proseryl, and Ropoxyl.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp. 758–. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3. 
  2. ^ Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory. Taylor & Francis. January 2000. pp. 636–. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. 
  3. ^ a b c d Maija Haavisto (1 May 2008). Reviving the Broken Marionette: Treatments for CFS/ME and Fibromyalgia. Lulu.com. pp. 167–. ISBN 978-1-4092-0335-3. 
  4. ^ Marcer, D; Hopkins, SM (1977). "The differential effects of meclofenoxate on memory loss in the elderly". Age and ageing. 6 (2): 123–31. doi:10.1093/ageing/6.2.123. PMID 329662. 
  5. ^ The Science of Anti-aging Medicine. American Academy of Anti-Aging Med. 1 January 2003. pp. 66–. ISBN 978-0-9668937-3-1. 
  6. ^ Yong Zhou (22 October 2013). Drugs in Psychiatric Practice. Elsevier. ISBN 978-1-4831-9193-5.