Minnesota's 7th congressional district

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Minnesota's 7th congressional district
Minnesota US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
Minnesota's 7th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Michelle Fischbach
RRegal
Area31,796[1] sq mi (82,350 km2)
Distribution
  • 64.13% rural[2]
  • 35.87% urban
Population (2019)668,096[3]
Median household
income
$60,932[4]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+17[5]
External image
image icon THIS govtrack.us MAP, is a useful representation of the 7th CD's borders, based on Google Maps.

Minnesota's 7th congressional district covers the majority of western Minnesota except for a few southern counties in 1st district. It is by far the state's largest district, and has a very rural character. Cities in the district include Moorhead (its largest city), Fergus Falls, Alexandria and Willmar. The district is currently represented by Republican Michelle Fischbach.

Demographics[edit]

According to the APM Research Lab's Voter Profile Tools[6] (featuring the U.S. Census Bureau's 2019 American Community Survey), the district contained about 501,000 potential voters (citizens, age 18+). Of these, 91% are White and 9% are people of color. Immigrants make up 2% of the district's potential voters. Median income among households (with one or more potential voter) in the district is about $61,000, while 9% of households live below the poverty line. As for the educational attainment of potential voters in the district, 8% of those 25 and older have not earned a high school degree, while 22% hold a bachelor's or higher degree.

List of members representing the district[edit]

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1893
HaldorBoen.jpg
Haldor Boen
Populist March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Elected in 1892.
Lost re-election.
FrankEddy.jpg
Frank Eddy
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1903
54th
55th
56th
57th
Elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Retired.
AndrewVolstead.jpg
Andrew Volstead
Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1923
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
Elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.
OleJKvale.jpg
Ole J. Kvale
Farmer–Labor March 4, 1923 –
September 11, 1929
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Died.
Vacant September 11, 1929 –
October 16, 1929
71st
Paul John Kvale 1932.jpg
Paul John Kvale
Farmer–Labor October 16, 1929 –
March 3, 1933
71st
72nd
Elected to finish his father's term.
Re-elected in 1930.
Redistricted to the at-large district.
District inactive March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd All representatives elected at-large on a general ticket.
Paul John Kvale 1932.jpg
Paul John Kvale
Farmer–Labor January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1939
74th
75th
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Lost re-election.
Herman Carl Andersen.jpg
Herman Carl Andersen
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1963
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
Elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Lost renomination in a redistricting contest.
OdinLangen.jpg
Odin Langen
Republican January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1971
88th
89th
90th
91st
Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Lost re-election.
Robert Bergland - USDA portrait.jpg
Robert Bergland
Democratic (DFL) January 3, 1971 –
January 22, 1977
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
Elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of Agriculture.
Vacant January 22, 1977 –
February 22, 1977
95th
Arlan Stangeland.png
Arlan Stangeland
Republican February 22, 1977 –
January 3, 1991
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
Elected to finish Bergland's term.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Lost re-election.
Collin Peterson official photo.jpg
Collin Peterson
Democratic (DFL) January 3, 1991 –
January 3, 2021
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Lost re-election.
2020-11-18-LH-Studio1- Fischbach-Michelle-0029-re-SELECT.jpg
Michelle Fischbach
Republican January 3, 2021 –
present
117th Elected in 2020.

Recent elections[edit]

Graph of election results in Minnesota's 7th congressional district (minor parties omitted)

2002[edit]

2002 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 170,234 65.27 -
Republican Dan Stevens 90,342 34.64 -

2004[edit]

2004 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 207,628 66.07 +1
Republican David Sturrock 106,349 33.84 -

2006[edit]

2006 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 179,164 70 +4
Republican Michael Barrett 74,557 29 -
Constitution Ken Lucier 3,303 1 -

2008[edit]

2008 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 227,180 72.20 +2.2
Republican Glen Menze 87,062 27.67 -
N/A others 431 0.14 -

2010[edit]

2010 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 159,479 52.5 -19.7
Republican Lee Byberg 90,650 37.6 +9.2
N/A others 17,155 7.2 -

2012[edit]

2012 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 197,791 60.4 +7.9
Republican Lee Byberg 114,151 34.8 -2.8
N/A others 4.7 -

2014[edit]

2014 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 130,546 54.2 -6.2
Republican Torrey Westrom 109,955 45.7 +10.9
N/A others 334 0.1 -

2016[edit]

2016 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 173,589 52.5 -1.7
Republican Dave Hughes 156,952 47.4 +1.7
N/A others 307 0.1 -

2018[edit]

2018 Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 146,672 52.1 -0.4
Republican Dave Hughes 134,668 47.9 +0.4
N/A others 168 >0.1 -

2020[edit]

Minnesota's 7th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michelle Fischbach 194,066 53.4
Democratic (DFL) Collin Peterson (incumbent) 144,840 39.8
Legal Marijuana Now Slater Johnson 17,710 4.9
Grassroots Rae Hart Anderson 6,499 1.8
Write-in 362 0.1

Election results from presidential races[edit]

Election results from presidential races:

Year Office Results Political parties that won the district
2000 President George W. Bush 54 - Al Gore 40% Republican Party (United States)
2004 President George W. Bush 55 - John Kerry 43% Republican Party (United States)
2008 President John McCain 50 - Barack Obama 47% Republican Party (United States)
2012 President Mitt Romney 54 - Barack Obama 44% Republican Party (United States)
2016 President Donald Trump 62 - Hillary Clinton 31% Republican Party (United States)
2020 President Donald Trump 63 - Joe Biden 34% Republican Party (United States)

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003 - 2013

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minnesota congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved April 2, 2007.
  2. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov. Retrieved April 7, 2018.
  3. ^ Bureau, Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. Retrieved April 7, 2018.
  4. ^ "My Congressional District".
  5. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  6. ^ "Representing US: 2020 Voter Profiles". APM Research Lab. Retrieved October 22, 2020.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 46°33′11″N 95°40′33″W / 46.55306°N 95.67583°W / 46.55306; -95.67583