Texas elections, 2018

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The 2018 general election will be held in the U.S. state of Texas on November 6, 2018. All of Texas' executive officers will be up for election as well as a United States Senate seat, and all of Texas' thirty-six seats in the United States House of Representatives. The Republican and Democratic Parties nominate their candidates by primaries held March 6, 2018. Convention Parties nominate their candidates at a series of conventions. County Conventions held March 17, 2018, District Conventions held March 24, 2018, and a State Convention held April 14, 2018. [1] At the present time there is only one Convention Party in Texas, that is the Libertarian Party. Other parties may seek to achieve ballot access. [2]

Contents

United States Senate[edit]

Beto O'Rourke is running for election. Incumbent U.S. Senator Ted Cruz is running for re-election.

United States House of Representatives[edit]

All of Texas' thirty-six seats in the United States House of Representatives will be up for election in 2018.[3]

Governor[edit]

Incumbent governor Greg Abbott is running for a second term. He was first elected in 2014 after serving twelve years as Texas Attorney General, and he succeeded Rick Perry as governor.

Abbott won the March 20, 2018, Republican primary, while Lupe Valdez won the Democratic runoff against Andrew White, becoming the first Latina nominated by a major party for statewide office in Texas.

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

On January 9, 2017, the day before the 85th Texas Legislature began its session, incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick announced he would run for re-election in 2018.[4] He stated his early announcement was in order to dispel rumors that he would challenge Governor Greg Abbott or U.S. Senator Ted Cruz.[4]

Republican primary[edit]

  • Dan Patrick, incumbent lieutenant governor
  • Scott Milder, former City Councilman of Rockwall [5][6]
Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Dan Patrick (incumbent) 1,168,331 76.04% +34.61%
Republican Scott Milder 367,954 23.95%
Total votes 1,536,285 100% +202,389
Turnout 10.07%[8] -0.26%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Mike Collier, businessman, Finance Chair of the Texas Democratic Party and nominee for Comptroller in 2014.[9]
  • Michael Cooper, businessman, community leader and pastor.[10]
Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Mike Collier 501,782 52.37%
Democratic Michael Cooper 456,326 47.62%
Total votes 958,108 100% +506,286
Turnout 6.28%[8] +2.96%[8]

Libertarian state convention[edit]

  • Kerry McKinnon, is seeking the LPTexas nomination.[12]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Dan
Patrick (R)
Mike
Collier (D)
Kerry
McKennon (L)
Other Undecided
Gravis Marketing July 3–7, 2018 602 ± 4.0% 46% 44% 10%
UoT/Texas Tribune June 8–17, 2018 1,200 ± 2.83% 37% 31% 4% 5% 23%

Attorney General[edit]

Incumbent Republican Attorney General Ken Paxton will be eligible to run for re-election to a second term.[13]

Potential Republican candidates include U.S. Representative Michael McCaul, who is a former Deputy Attorney General.[14]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Ken Paxton (incumbent) 1,312,172 100% +55.55%
Total votes 1,312,172 100% +32,112
Turnout 8.6%[8] -0.81%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Justin Nelson, a partner at Susman Godfrey, is seeking the Democratic nomination. [15]
Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Justin Nelson 884,376 100%
Total votes 884,376 100% +446,858
Turnout 5.79%[8] +2.57%[8]

Libertarian state convention[edit]

  • Michael Ray Harris, is seeking the LPTexas nomination.[16]
  • Jamar Osborne, is seeking the LPTexas nomination.[17]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Ken
Paxton (R)
Justin
Nelson (D)
Michael Ray
Harris (L)
Other Undecided
Gravis Marketing July 3–7, 2018 602 ± 4.0% 45% 41% 14%
UoT/Texas Tribune June 8–17, 2018 1,200 ± 2.83% 32% 31% 6% 4% 26%
Baselice & Associates (R-TLRPAC) May 21–28, 2018 45% 33%

Comptroller of Public Accounts[edit]

Incumbent Republican Comptroller Glenn Hegar is eligible to run for re-election to a second term.[18]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Glenn Hegar (incumbent) 1,265,461 100% +50%
Total votes 1,265,461 100% +40,825
Turnout 8.29%[8] -0.71%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Joi Chevalier
  • Tim Mahoney
Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Joi Chevalier 484,321 51.85%
Democratic Tim Mahoney 449,729 48.14%
Total votes 934,050 100% +504,130
Turnout 6.12%[8] +2.96%[8]

Libertarian state convention[edit]

  • Ben Sanders, is seeking the LPTexas nomination. [19]

Commissioner of the General Land Office[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican George P. Bush (incumbent) 859,209 58.18% -14.82%
Republican Jerry Patterson 438,346 29.68%
Republican Davey Edwards 101,074 6.84%
Republican Rick Range 77,936 5.27%
Total votes 1,476,565 100% +191,629
Turnout 9.68%[8] -0.23%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Tex Morgan
  • Miguel Suazo
Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Miguel Suazo 660,752 69.99%
Democratic Tex Morgan 283,180 30%
Total votes 943,932 100% +510,722
Turnout 6.18%[8] +2.99%[8]

Libertarian state convention[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

George P. Bush
Presidents of the United States

Commissioner of Agriculture[edit]

Incumbent Republican Commissioner Sid Miller will be eligible to run for re-election to a second term.[27]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sid Miller (incumbent) 758,548 55.83% +21.27%
Republican Jim Hogan 309,494 22.78%
Republican Trey Blocker 290,494 21.38%
Total votes 1,358,536 100% +167,744
Turnout 8.9%[8] +0.15%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Kim Olson 879,492 100%
Total votes 879,492 100% +388,827
Turnout 5.76%[8] +2.16%[8]

Libertarian state convention[edit]

  • Richard Carpenter[32]

Texas Railroad Commissioner[edit]

Incumbent Republican Commissioner Christi Craddick is eligible to run for re-election to a second six-year term.[33]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Christi Craddick (incumbent) 1,038,753 75.81% +39.94%
Republican Weston Martinez 331,317 24.18%
Total votes 1,370,070 100% +194,844
Turnout 8.98%[8] -0.01%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Roman McAllen[34]
  • Chris Spellmon
Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Roman McAllen 537,234 58.50%
Democratic Chris Spellmon 381,051 41.49%
Total votes 918,285 100% +472,125
Turnout 6.02%[8] +2.61%[8]

Libertarian state convention[edit]

  • Mike Wright, is seeking the LPTexas nomination.[35]

Supreme Court of Texas[edit]

Justice, Place 2 election[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Jimmy Blacklock 1,211,527 100%
Total votes 1,211,527 100% +76,631
Turnout 7.94%[8] -0.75%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Steven Kirkland 871,267 100%
Total votes 871,267 100% +871,267
Turnout 5.71%[8] +5.71%[8]

Justice, Place 4 election[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican John Devine (incumbent) 1,207,507 100%
Total votes 1,207,507 100% +97,020
Turnout 7.91%[8] -0.59%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic R.K. Sandill 864,749 100%
Total votes 864,749 100% +864,749
Turnout 5.67%[8] +5.67%[8]

Justice, Place 6 election[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Jeff Brown 1,201,316 100%
Total votes 1,201,316 100% +206,601
Turnout 7.87%[8] +0.26%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Kathy Cheng 870,008 100%
Total votes 870,008 100% +430,706
Turnout 5.7%[8] +2.34%[8]

Texas Court of Criminal Appeals[edit]

Presiding Judge election[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sharon Keller (incumbent) 672,301 52.14% -47.86%
Republican David Bridges 617,031 47.85%
Total votes 1,289,332 100% +286,914
Turnout 8.45%[8] +0.78%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Maria T. (Terri) Jackson 874,556 100%
Total votes 874,556 100% +442,445
Turnout 5.73%[8] +2.42%[8]

Judge, Place 7 election[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Barbara Parker Hervey (incumbent) 1,167,846 100%
Total votes 1,167,846 100% +186,031
Turnout 7.65%[8] +0.14%[8]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ramona Franklin 868,161 100%
Total votes 868,161 100% +868,161
Turnout 5.69%[8] +5.69%[8]

Judge, Place 8[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Michelle Slaughter 667,538 52.83%
Republican Jay Brandon 388,492 30.74%
Republican Dib Waldrip 207,467 16.42%
Total votes 1,263,497 100% +301,028
Turnout 8.28%[8] +0.91%[8]

Texas State Board of Education[edit]

Member, District 2[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Charles "Tad" Hasse 31,717 67.12%
Republican Eric Garza 15,536 32.87%
Total votes 47,253 100% +47,253

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ruben Cortez, Jr. (incumbent) 31,289 52.34% -47.66%
Democratic Michelle Arevalo Davila 28,487 47.65%
Total votes 59,776 100% +15,817

Member, District 3[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Marisa B. Perez (incumbent) 60,027 75.93% -24.07%
Democratic Dan Arellano 19,022 24.06%
Total votes 79,049 100% +33,721

Member, District 4[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Lawrence Allen Jr. (incumbent) 45,162 66.9% -33.1%
Democratic Steven A. Chambers 22,337 33.09%
Total votes 67,499 100% +41,084

Member, District 7[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Matt Robinson 100%
Total votes 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Elizabeth Markowitz 100%
Total votes 100%

Member, District 11[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Patricia "Pat" Hardy (incumbent) 58,796 55.75% +6.18%
Republican Feyi Obamehinti 25,580 24.25%
Republican Cheryl Surber 21,073 19.98%
Total votes 105,449 100% +18,482

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Carla Morton 33,217 57.89%
Democratic Celeste Light 24,156 42.1%
Total votes 57,373 100% +34,520

Member, District 12[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

First round[edit]
Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Suzanne Smith 35,460 48.06%
Democratic Laura Malone-Miller 19,426 26.33%
Democratic Tina Green 18,883 25.59%
Total votes 73,769 100% +6,404

Member, District 13[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican A. Denise Russell 100%
Total votes 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Aicha Davis 100%
Total votes 100%

Texas Legislature[edit]

Every seat in the Texas House of Representatives and about half of the seats in the Texas Senate will be up for election.

Texas Senate[edit]

Texas House of Representatives[edit]

Texas Courts of Appeals[edit]

Local trial courts[edit]

School boards[edit]

Municipal[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/candidates/guide/dates2018.shtml
  2. ^ http://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/candidates/guide/lib-green-nom2018.shtml
  3. ^ Executive Branch Archived 2011-06-29 at the Wayback Machine. retrieved 23-October-2008
  4. ^ a b Whitely, Jason (January 9, 2017). "Lt. Gov. Patrick Announces Re-Election Campaign". WFAA. Retrieved January 10, 2017. 
  5. ^ "Milder to Challenge Dan Patrick". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved 2017-12-04. 
  6. ^ TEGNA. "Austin native Scott Milder announces bid for Lieutenant Governor". KVUE. Retrieved 2017-12-04. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Office of the Secretary of State 2018 Republican Party Primary Election Election Night Returns
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at Percentage of turnout to registered voters
  9. ^ http://us.blastingnews.com/news/2017/06/mike-collier-is-the-only-challenger-to-texas-gop-led-government-001740925.html
  10. ^ http://fox4beaumont.com/news/local/beaumont-pastor-announces-bid-for-lieutenant-governor
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Office of the Secretary of State 2018 Democratic Party Primary Election Election Night Returns
  12. ^ "2018 Candidates". lptexas.org. Retrieved December 20, 2017. 
  13. ^ Executive Branch Archived 2011-06-29 at the Wayback Machine. retrieved 23-October-2008
  14. ^ Lovegrove, Jamie; Leslie, Katie (October 12, 2016). "Rep. Michael McCaul laying groundwork for higher office, even if he doesn't know which one yet". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 15, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton draws first Democratic challenger for 2018". texastribune.org. Retrieved January 16, 2018. 
  16. ^ "2018 Candidates". lptexas.org. Retrieved December 20, 2017. 
  17. ^ "2018 Candidates". lptexas.org. Retrieved December 20, 2017. 
  18. ^ Executive Branch Archived 2011-06-29 at the Wayback Machine. retrieved 23-October-2008
  19. ^ vote4sanders.com
  20. ^ Weissert, Will (June 19, 2017). "George P Bush seeks re-election as Texas land commissioner". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 19, 2017. 
  21. ^ Tribe, Kristen (March 29, 2017). "Edwards pursues state office". Wise County Messenger. Retrieved June 21, 2017. 
  22. ^ Tribe, Kristen (June 4, 2017). "Edwards starts signature drive for place on ballot". Wise County Messenger. Retrieved June 21, 2017. 
  23. ^ http://www.governing.com/topics/politics/tns-trump-endorse-texas-republicans-twitter.html
  24. ^ "2018 Candidates". lptexas.org. Retrieved December 20, 2017. 
  25. ^ https://twitter.com/GeorgeHWBush/status/969623505150017541
  26. ^ https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/968620661349470209
  27. ^ Executive Branch Archived 2011-06-29 at the Wayback Machine. retrieved 23-October-2008
  28. ^ "Sid Miller Announces Re-election Campaign for Texas Agriculture Commissioner". Texas Insider. 2017-11-13. Retrieved 2017-11-20. 
  29. ^ "Sid Miller announces reelection bid". Dallas Voice. 2017-11-08. Retrieved 2017-11-20. 
  30. ^ "Austin Lobbyist to Challenge Sid Miller". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved 2017-12-04. 
  31. ^ Coyne, Christin (May 19, 2017). "Former WISD trustee Olson seeks office". Weatherford Democrat. Retrieved June 21, 2017. 
  32. ^ "2018 Candidates". lptexas.org. Retrieved December 20, 2017. 
  33. ^ Executive Branch Archived 2011-06-29 at the Wayback Machine. retrieved 23-October-2008
  34. ^ Heinkel-Wolfe, Peggy (July 5, 2017). "McAllen announces run for Texas Railroad Commission". Denton Record-Chronicle. Retrieved July 18, 2017. 
  35. ^ "2018 Candidates". lptexas.org. Retrieved December 20, 2017. 

External links[edit]