Union County, North Carolina

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Union County, North Carolina
Union County Courthouse, Monroe (Union County, North Carolina).jpg
Old Union County Courthouse
Seal of Union County, North Carolina
Seal
Map of North Carolina highlighting Union County
Location in the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1842
Seat Monroe
Largest town Indian Trail
Area
 • Total 640 sq mi (1,658 km2)
 • Land 632 sq mi (1,637 km2)
 • Water 8.0 sq mi (21 km2), 1.3%
Population
 • (2010) 201,292
Congressional districts 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.co.union.nc.us

Union County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 201,292.[1] Its county seat is Monroe.[2]

Union County is included in the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

The county was formed in 1842 from parts of Anson County and Mecklenburg County. Its name was a compromise between Whigs, who wanted to name the new county for Henry Clay, and Democrats, who wanted to name it for Andrew Jackson. The Helms, Starnes, McRorie, and Belk families took a major part in the Monroe and Charlotte, North Carolina. Most of these families came from Goose Creek Township.

Monroe, the county seat of Union County, also became a focal point during the Civil Rights Movement. In 1958, local NAACP Chapter President Robert F. Williams defended a nine-year-old African-American boy who had been kissed by a white girl in an incident known as the Kissing Case. A second African-American boy, aged seven, was also convicted and sentenced to live in a juvenile reformatory until he was 21 for simply witnessing the act. In 1961, Williams was accused of kidnapping an elderly white couple, when he sheltered them in his house during a very explosive situation of high racial tensions. Williams fled and went into exile in Cuba and in the People's Republic of China before returning to the United States.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 640 square miles (1,700 km2), of which 632 square miles (1,640 km2) is land and 8.0 square miles (21 km2) (1.3%) is water.[3]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 10,051
1860 11,202 11.5%
1870 12,217 9.1%
1880 18,056 47.8%
1890 21,259 17.7%
1900 27,156 27.7%
1910 33,277 22.5%
1920 36,029 8.3%
1930 40,979 13.7%
1940 39,097 −4.6%
1950 42,034 7.5%
1960 44,670 6.3%
1970 54,714 22.5%
1980 70,380 28.6%
1990 84,211 19.7%
2000 123,677 46.9%
2010 201,292 62.8%
Est. 2015 222,742 [4] 10.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2014[1]

As of the census[9] of 2010, there were 201,292 people, 67,864 households, and 54,019 families residing in the county. The population density was 194 people per square mile (75/km²). There were 45,695 housing units at an average density of 314 per square mile (28/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.0% White, 11.7% Black or African American, 0.4% Native American, 1.6% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 5.3% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. 10.4% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 67,864 households out of which 42.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.60% were married couples living together, and 10.70% had a female householder with no husband present. 6.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.94 and the average family size was 3.3.

In the county, the population was spread out with 32.90% under the age of 20, 4.7% from 20 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.2 years. The population was 49.4% male.

Politics, law and government[edit]

Union County, North Carolina vote
by party in presidential elections[10]
Year Republican Democratic Other
2016[11] 63.1% 66,707 32.5% 34,337 4.4% 4,666
2012[12] 64.5% 61,107 34.3% 32,473 1.2% 1,148
2008[13] 62.9% 54,123 36.2% 31,189 0.9% 777
2004[14] 70.2% 42,820 29.5% 17,974 0.3% 207
2000[15] 67.6% 31,876 31.6% 14,890 0.8% 395
1996[16] 57.0% 18,802 35.0% 11,525 8.0% 2,643
1992[17] 51.7% 16,542 33.7% 10,789 14.6% 4,661
1988[18] 65.7% 17,015 34.1% 8,820 0.2% 61
1984[19] 70.4% 16,885 29.4% 7,048 0.1% 35
1980[20] 45.8% 9,012 51.2% 10,073 3.1% 603
1976[21] 36.7% 6,184 62.8% 10,578 0.5% 78
1972[22] 71.6% 10,264 27.1% 3,886 1.3% 186
1968[23] 38.7% 5,290 26.5% 3,630 34.8% 4,761
1964[24] 37.0% 4,229 63.0% 7,208
1960[25] 35.3% 4,030 64.7% 7,393
1956 34.5% 3,362 65.5% 6,383
1952 33.8% 3,790 66.2% 7,416
1948 14.3% 738 66.2% 3,407 19.4% 999
1944 16.3% 1,114 83.7% 5,729
1940 8.1% 634 91.9% 7,179
1936 7.4% 601 92.6% 7,480
1932 10.3% 710 88.8% 6,103 0.8% 57
1928 46.3% 2,448 53.7% 2,840
1924 19.6% 672 79.4% 2,721 0.9% 32
1920 25.2% 1,404 74.8% 4,168

In its early years Union County was typically firm “Solid South” Democratic apart from the 1928 election when anti-Catholicism meant that Al Smith won the county by only seven percentage points. Union County remained classically “Solid South” until after the Civil Rights revolution. The first Republican to win the county was Richard Nixon[26] with less than forty percent of the vote in a three-way race in 1968. Following Nixon’s election, the trend towards liberalism in the Democratic Party has turned Union into a strongly Republican county over the past half-century. The last Democrat to win Union County was Jimmy Carter in 1980, and since then no Democrat has done better than 36 percent of the county’s vote.

Union County is a member of the regional Centralina Council of Governments.

Education[edit]

Events[edit]

Entering Union County on North Carolina Highway 200
  • Warbirds Over Monroe is an airshow celebrating the machines that our veterans used to keep our Nation free. Located in the City of Monroe at the Charlotte-Monroe Executive Airport and held annually on the first weekend in November. The event generates crowds that have exceeded 85,000 people making it one of the top 25 tourism related events in the Charlotte Region.
  • Brooklandwood in the Union County town of Mineral Springs is the site of the Queens Cup Steeplechase, one of steeplechase horse racing's major annual events. The program consists of several races, and is held the last Saturday of April. The schedule of events also features a Jack Russell Terrier judging contest. Over 10,000 people descend on Mineral Springs from all parts of the country to take part in this day-long event of races and other activities.
  • The Union County town of Marshville is the site of the Boll Weevil Festival, an annual street fair and carnival that takes place every fall.

Communities[edit]

Map of Union County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

City[edit]

Towns[edit]

Villages[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost towns[edit]

Townships[edit]

  • Goose Creek
  • Jackson
  • Marshville
  • Monroe
  • New Salem
  • Vance
  • Buford
  • Lanes Creek
  • Sandy Ridge

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 30, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved January 20, 2015. 
  4. ^ "County Totals Dataset: Population, Population Change and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 20, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 20, 2015. 
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 20, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 20, 2015. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; pp. 324-333 ISBN 0405077114
  11. ^ "2016 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  12. ^ "2012 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  13. ^ "2008 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  14. ^ "2004 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  15. ^ "2000 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  16. ^ "1996 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  17. ^ "1992 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  18. ^ "1988 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  19. ^ "1984 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  20. ^ "1980 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  21. ^ "1976 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  22. ^ "1972 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  23. ^ "1968 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  24. ^ "1964 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  25. ^ "1960 Presidential General Election Data Graphs – North Carolina". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  26. ^ Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868-2004, pp. 95-96 ISBN 0786422173

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°59′N 80°32′W / 34.99°N 80.53°W / 34.99; -80.53