Australian Intelligence Community

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Australian intelligence agencies)
Jump to: navigation, search

The Australian Government statutory intelligence agencies that constitute the Australian Intelligence Community (AIC) are as follows:

Governance entities[edit]

The National Security Committee (NSC) is a Cabinet committee and the peak ministerial decision-making body on national security matters. It is chaired by the Prime Minister and the membership includes the Deputy Prime Minister, Attorney-General, Treasurer, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Minister for Defence and Minister for Immigration and Citizenship. The Secretaries for each respective public service department as well as the Chief of the Defence Force, the National Security Adviser, the Director-General of Security and the Director General of the Office of National Assessments and the Australian Secret Intelligence Service.[1][2][3][4]

The Secretaries Committee on National Security (SCNS) is the senior inter-departmental committee supporting the National Security Committee. It considers all matters to be put before the NSC and has a strong role in ensuring that Australia maintains a coordinated policy approach on all national security issues. It is chaired by the National Security Adviser, and the membership contains all non-ministerial positions and secretaries of the departments of the National Security Committee, plus the Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police, the Commander of the Border Protection Command and the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service and the Australian Crime Commission.[5]

The National Counter-Terrorism Committee (NCTC) is a national body comprising representatives from the Government of the Commonwealth, States and Territories. It was established by the Inter-Governmental Agreement 24 October 2002. The role of the NCTC is to contribute to the security of the Australian community through coordination of a nation-wide cooperative framework, known as the National Counter-Terrorism Plan, to counter terrorism and its consequences. The committee now meets twice a year with representatives from the Australian Government and state and territory governments.[6]

The National Intelligence Coordination Committee (NICC) is to ensure that Australia's foreign, security and law enforcement intelligence activities are closely aligned and consistent with our national security priorities, and that the national intelligence effort is effectively integrated. It is chaired by the National Security Adviser and contains representation from all intelligence and security agencies.[7][8]

  • The National Intelligence Collection Management Committee (NICMC) is a subcommittee of the National Intelligence Coordination Committee and is responsible for setting specific requirements and evaluating collection effort against each of the National Intelligence Priorities (NIPs). It is chaired by the Director General of the Office of National Assessments.[9]
  • The National Intelligence Open Source Committee (NIOSC) is a subcommittee of the National Intelligence Coordination Committee and is responsible for enhancing the coordination and capabilities of the national intelligence community’s open source efforts. It is chaired by the Director General of the Office of National Assessments.[10]

The Heads of Intelligence Agencies Meeting (HIAM) brings together a sub-group of the all the national intelligence agencies comprising to consider issues relating specifically to Australia’s foreign intelligence activities. It is chaired by the Director General of the Office of National Assessments and the Deputy Secretary for Defence Intelligence, Security and International Policy attends.[11]

Policy entities[edit]

The National Security and International Policy Group is in Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and led by the National Security Advisor and provides advice on Australia's foreign, trade and treaty matters, defence, intelligence, non-proliferation, counter-terrorism, law enforcement, border security and emergency management matters; coordinates security-related science and technology research matters; and plays a coordinating leadership role in the development of integrated, whole-of-government national security policy. The National Security and International Policy Group comprises four divisions each led by a First Assistant Secretary.

  • The National Security Adviser (NSA)[12] is the Executive of the National Security and International Policy Group and is an Associate Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and source of advice to the Prime Minister and Cabinet on all policy matters relating to the security of the nation and oversees the implementation of all national security policy arrangements. The NSA's responsibilities complement the roles and responsibilities of the heads of individual national security agencies by enhancing whole-of-government coordination.[13]
  • The Deputy National Security Adviser (DNSA) supports the work of the National Security Adviser across the breadth of national security and international policy development, advice and coordination responsibilities, provides whole-of-government leadership on a range of national security policy issues, including as chair of the National Counter-Terrorism Committee and the National Crisis Committee and co-chair of the Australian Emergency Management Committee and oversees the routine business of the National Security and International Policy Group.
  • The National Security Chief Information Officer (NSCIO) provides strategic direction and coordination for information sharing across the national security community and to coordinate the whole-of-government approach to cyber policies and activities. This includes harmonising the broad policy, governance and legislative arrangements currently in place so as to improve interoperability and collaboration, provide oversight of the national security information management environment and provide strategic leadership and coordination on matters of cyber policy and strategies across the entire cyber spectrum, from online consumer protection to cyber defence.[14]
  • The International Division provides advice, coordination and leadership on Australia’s foreign, trade, aid and treaty matters and priorities, including bilateral relations, relationships with regional and international organisations, free trade negotiations and whole-of-government priorities for the overseas aid program. It also incorporates the International Strategy Unit, which focuses on developing innovative and forward-looking advice on policy challenges in the medium to long term across the foreign and international security domains.
  • The Homeland and Border Security Division provides advice, coordination and leadership on integrated, whole-of-government policy matters, priorities and strategy in the areas of critical infrastructure protection, e-security, non-proliferation, counter-terrorism, law enforcement, border security and emergency management issues. This Division is divided into the Border, Counter Terrorism and Strategic Planning Branch; and the Emergency Management and Proliferation Issues Branch.
  • The Defence, Intelligence and Research Coordination Division provides advice, coordination and leadership on integrated, whole-of-government policy matters, priorities and strategy in the areas of defence, intelligence coordination and cooperation matters, and national security, science and innovation policy and programs. This Division is divided into the Defence Policy Branch; the National Security Science and Technology Branch; and Intelligence Policy Branch.
  • The National Security Science and Technology Branch provides a national focus for science and innovation aimed at enhancing Australia's national security and coordinating the collation and dissemination of national security science and innovation priorities and research outcomes.[15]

The International Security Division (ISD) is in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and is the international security and foreign intelligence policy and governance coordination entity and headed by a First Assistant Secretary. It is divided into four branches each led by an Assistant Secretary:

  • The Office of the Ambassador for Counter-Terrorism
  • The Counter-Terrorism Branch
  • The Arms Control and Counter-Proliferation Branch
  • The Strategic Issues and Intelligence Branch
  • The Intelligence Policy and Liaison Section

The National Security and Criminal Justice Group is in the Attorney-General's Department and the policy and governance coordination entity for domestic security and criminal intelligence and is led by a Deputy Secretary. It is divided into six divisions.

  • The National Security Resilience and Policy Division is responsible for policy, legislation, advice and programs related to developing resilience to all hazards, including the areas of critical infrastructure protection, electronic and identity security, and protective security policy.[16]
  • The National Security Capability and Development Division is responsible for developing national security capability; coordinating procedures, training, exercises, evaluation, procurement and research and development for all hazards; managing the National CounterTerrorism Committee Administered Fund; delivering training and education; administering grants to volunteer organisations, for disaster mitigation, and Geo-Spatial Capabilities.[17]
  • The National Security Law and Policy Division is responsible for policy, legislation and advice on national security, counterterrorism, chemical security, surveillance devices, telecommunications interception and for delivery of vetting and background checking services which incorporates the Australian Security Vetting Service.[18]

The Office of the Secretary and Chief of Defence Force Group is the integrated diarchy command of the Australian Defence Organisation consisting of the Secretary of the Department of Defence and the Chief of the Defence Force. It supports the strategy and administration of the Australian Defence Organisation and maintains intelligence and security strategy and coordination functions:[19]

  • The International Policy Division provides strategic level policy advice to Government on Australia's defence relations and Australian Defence Force operations.[20]
  • The Strategic Policy Division provides analysis of Australia's strategic environment to inform Defence decision making, including on the development and use of military capability, the employment of the ADF, involvement in certain international programs such as the Proliferation Security Initiative, and export controls.[21]

Primary entities[edit]

The Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) is Australia's national security service with the main role is to gather information and produce intelligence that will enable it to warn the government about activities or situations that might endanger Australia's national security. The ASIO Act defines "security" as the protection of Australia's territorial and border integrity from serious threats, and the protection of Australia and its people from espionage, sabotage, politically motivated violence, the promotion of communal violence, attacks on Australia's defence system, and acts of foreign interference. ASIO also includes the Counter-Terrorism Control Centre which is responsible for setting and managing counter-terrorism priorities, identifying intelligence requirements, and ensuring the processes of collecting and distributing counter terrorism information are fully harmonised and effective. The National Threat Assessment Centre is also part of ASIO and is responsible for analysis of terrorist threats to Australian interests overseas and terrorist threats and threats from violent protests in Australia.[22]

The Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) is Australia's overseas secret HUMINT collection agency with the mission to protect and promote Australia's vital interests through the provision of unique foreign intelligence services as directed by Government. ASIS's primary goal is to obtain and distribute secret intelligence about the capabilities, intentions and activities of individuals or organisations outside Australia, which may impact on Australia's interests and the well-being of its citizens.[23]

The Office of National Assessments (ONA) produces all-source assessments on international political, strategic and economic developments as an independent body directly accountable to the Prime Minister and provides advice and assessments to other Senior Ministers in the National Security Committee of Cabinet, and Senior Officials of Government Departments. ONA operates under its own legislation and has responsibility for coordinating and evaluating Australia's foreign intelligence activities. It draws its information from other intelligence agencies, as well as diplomatic reporting, information and reporting from other government agencies, and open source material.[24]

The Defence Intelligence and Security Group is an organisation of the Department of Defence that coordinates intelligence, security and other strategic policies. It is divided into four sub agencies.

  • The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) is responsible for collection, analysis and distribution of foreign signals intelligence and is the national authority on communications, information, cyber and computer security. The ASD also includes the Cyber Security Operations Centre which coordinates and assists with operational responses to cyber events of national importance and provides government with a consolidated understanding of the cyber threat through its intrusion detection, analytic and threat assessment capabilities.[27]
  • The Defence Security Authority (DSA) helps the Department of Defence Groups and the Australian Defence Force with protective security matters. The DSA’s responsibilities include developing and promulgating security policy that complies with Australian Government protective security policy, monitoring and reporting on security compliance, performance and risks, investigating serious and complex security incidents, granting security clearances for Defence and Defence Industry Security Program members, and conducting clearance revalidations and re-evaluations, assisting Groups and the Services with security policy implementation, and managing the Defence Industry Security Program.[28]

Secondary entities[edit]

The Australian Army Intelligence Corps (AUSTINT, AIC) is a corps of the Australian Army which serves as the principal military intelligence unit of the Australian Defence Force and provides staff to the Defence Intelligence and Security Group and major Australian Defence Force commands and staff organisations.[29][30]

The Australian Federal Police Intelligence Division (AFP) is a division of the Australian Federal Police under the Attorney-General's Department. It provides criminal intelligence and other intelligence capabilities across all operational functions and crime types. Divided into operational intelligence teams, the division collects, collates, analyses and disseminates intelligence on nationally significant criminal issues of interest to the AFP. Areas of intelligence operations extend to crime related to people smuggling, illicit drugs, human trafficking and sexual servitude, financial crime, counter-terrorism, high-tech crime, and child sex tourism.[31]

The Australian Crime Commission (ACC) is the national criminal intelligence and investigation agency under the Attorney-General's Department. It has a range of statutory functions centred on intelligence collection and dissemination and criminal investigations regarding nationally significant, serious and major crimes. The ACC recommends national criminal intelligence priorities (NCIPs), works collaboratively to federal, state and territory agencies, and maintains ongoing powers similar to a Royal Commission. The ACC shapes the national agenda on fighting serious crime, provides solutions for national serious crime priorities and maintains a leading capability in national criminal intelligence.[32]

The Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Intelligence and Targeting Division is a division of the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service under the Attorney-General's Department. It is responsible for the assessment of new and emerging threats to the border and customs and the provision of intelligence and targeting that informs and underpins risk mitigation.[33] It is divided into five groups:

  • The Cargo and Maritime Targeting Branch delivers cargo and maritime risk assessment, response coordination and information services that support legitimate trade and the risk based interventions needed to prevent the illegal movement of goods across the border. This incorporates multi domain risk indicator and target development, advanced analytical capability and capability development.[34]
  • The Counter People Smuggling Taskforce delivers intelligence that informs and supports policy, targeting and operational response to the management of border risks including maritime people smuggling. This branch incorporates mission integration of the whole of government effort in countering the irregular movement of people by sea.[35]
  • The Passenger Targeting Branch delivers traveller risk assessment, response co-ordination and information services that support legitimate travel and the risk based interventions needed to prevent the illegal movement of people and the goods they bring across the border. This branch incorporates the multi-agency passenger assessment, analysis, watch listing, traveller risk assessment capability development functions.[36]
  • The International Engagement (South East & South Asia) Branch encompasses Indonesia, Malaysia and Sri Lanka. The branch also has responsibility for Singapore, East Timor, the Philippines, Brunei, Maldives, Afghanistan and Pakistan. The Jakarta office is responsible for our regional people smuggling and illegal foreign fishing activity, as well as a broad range of customs and border protection intelligence, investigations, and passengers/trade facilitation activities.[37]
  • The Strategic Development (Passengers) Branch delivers the Enhanced Passenger Assessment and Clearance Program.[38]

The Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC) is the national financial intelligence agency under the Attorney-General's Department. It is responsible for gathering intelligence on and regulating money laundering, terrorism financing and major financial crimes.[39][40]

Oversight entities[edit]

Legislative bills[edit]

See also[edit]

In Australia[edit]

In other countries[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Office of National Assessments Australia's National Security Framework
  2. ^ [2] Attorney-General's Department Australian Government Coordination Counter-terrorism Committees
  3. ^ [3] Attorney-General's Department Australia's National Security Agencies
  4. ^ [4] Australian Government Directory National Security Committee
  5. ^ [5] Office of National Assessments Australia's National Security Framework
  6. ^ [6] National Counter-Terrorism Arrangements and National Counter-Terrorism Plan: National Counter-Terrorism Committee
  7. ^ [7] Office of National Assessments Australia's National Security Framework
  8. ^ [8] ASIO and the National Intelligence Coordination Committee
  9. ^ [9] Office of National Assessments Australia's National Security Framework
  10. ^ [10] Office of National Assessments Australia's National Security Framework
  11. ^ [11] Office of National Assessments Australia's National Security Framework
  12. ^ [12] Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet National Security and International Policy Group Executive
  13. ^ [13] Office of National Assessments Australia's National Security Framework
  14. ^ [14] National Security and International Policy Group Executive
  15. ^ [15] National Security Science and Technology Branch
  16. ^ [16] Attorney-General's Department organisational structure
  17. ^ [17] Attorney-General's Department organisational structure
  18. ^ [18] Attorney-General's Department organisational structure
  19. ^ [19] Australian Government Directory
  20. ^ [20] Australian Government Directory
  21. ^ [21] Australian Government Directory
  22. ^ [22] ASIO Overview
  23. ^ [23] ASIS Overview
  24. ^ [24] ONA About
  25. ^ [25] DIGO About
  26. ^ [26] DIO About
  27. ^ [27] ASD About
  28. ^ [28] DSA About
  29. ^ [29] Department of Defence Australian Army Intelligence Corps Media Release
  30. ^ [30] Defence Jobs Intelligence Corps Section
  31. ^ [31] Australian Federal Police Intelligence information
  32. ^ [32] Australian Crime Commission About Section
  33. ^ [33] Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Organisation Chart
  34. ^ [34] Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Organisation Chart
  35. ^ [35] Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Organisation Chart
  36. ^ [36] Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Organisation Chart
  37. ^ [37] Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Organisation Chart
  38. ^ [38] Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Organisation Chart
  39. ^ [39] AUSTRAC Overview
  40. ^ [40] AUSTRAC Official Website

External links[edit]