Carstairs, Alberta

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Carstairs
Town
Town of Carstairs
Main street in Carstairs
Main street in Carstairs
Flag of Carstairs
Flag
Coat of arms of Carstairs
Coat of arms
Carstairs is located in Alberta
Carstairs
Carstairs
Location of Carstairs in Alberta
Coordinates: 51°33′43″N 114°05′43″W / 51.56194°N 114.09528°W / 51.56194; -114.09528Coordinates: 51°33′43″N 114°05′43″W / 51.56194°N 114.09528°W / 51.56194; -114.09528
Country  Canada
Province  Alberta
Region Calgary Region
Census division 6
Municipal district Mountain View County
Founded 1903
Incorporated 1966
Government[1]
 • Mayor Lance Colby
 • Governing body Carstairs Town Council
 • CAO Carl McDonnell
 • MP Blake Richards, Wild Rose
 • MLA Richard Marz
Area (2011)[2]
 • Total 11.53 km2 (4.45 sq mi)
Elevation[3] 1,060 m (3,480 ft)
Population (2011)[2]
 • Total 3,442
 • Density 298.4/km2 (773/sq mi)
Time zone MST (UTC-7)
Postal code T0M 0N0
Area code(s) +1-403
Highways Highway 2A
Website Official website

Carstairs is a town in central Alberta, Canada. It is located on Highway 2A, 241 kilometres (150 mi) south of the provincial capital, Edmonton, and 48 kilometres (30 mi) north of Calgary, the nearest major city. The closest neighbouring communities are the towns of Didsbury and Crossfield. Carstairs is located entirely within the rural Mountain View County.

Named after Carstairs, Scotland, Carstairs began life as a loading platform on the railway connecting Calgary to Edmonton. The first post office opened in 1900.[4] The first school district was established in 1901.[5]

Demographics[edit]

In the 2011 Census, the Town of Carstairs had a population of 3,442 living in 1,311 of its 1,397 total dwellings, a 27.5% change from its 2006 adjusted population of 2,699. With a land area of 11.53 km2 (4.45 sq mi), it had a population density of 298.5/km2 (773.2/sq mi) in 2011.[2]

In 2006, Carstairs had a population of 2,656 living in 1,019 dwellings, a 17.8% increase from 2001. The town has a land area of 5.00 km2 (1.93 sq mi) and a population density of 531.2 /km2 (1,376 /sq mi).[6]

Transportation[edit]

First Student Canada provides commuter bus service to Calgary from Didsbury and Carstairs.[7] The service loads commuters at the Carstairs Curling Club.[8]

Amenities[edit]

Old Dominion Hotel

Carstairs is home to an 18-hole golf course, a Memorial Complex with abundant parks and playgrounds, and Tourist Information Center. Just west of town is the Silver Willow 9-hole golf course. Carstairs has historically been an agricultural community, as it once had seven grain elevators. It celebrates each year with the Ranch Rodeo in June, Beef & Barley Days and the annual rodeo in July, the High School Rodeo in September, 4-H Calf Show and Sale, Bull-A-Rama, Horticultural Show, and Pumpkin Festival.

There are seven churches in the town, including the Carstairs Church of God, St. Agnes Catholic Church, and the Carstairs Bancroft United Church. One of the churches is being used as a museum that often has religious services.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Municipal Officials Search". Alberta Municipal Affairs. 2014-07-04. Retrieved 2014-07-15. 
  2. ^ a b c "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2012-02-08. 
  3. ^ "Alberta Private Sewage Systems 2009 Standard of Practice Handbook: Appendix A.3 Alberta Design Data (A.3.A. Alberta Climate Design Data by Town)" (PDF). Safety Codes Council. January 2012. pp. 212–215 (PDF pages 226–229). Retrieved October 8, 2013. 
  4. ^ Carstairs History Book Committee (1995). Beyond our Prairie Trails, V. 1 Community history. p. 47. ISBN 1-55056-249-5. 
  5. ^ Francis, Alyce (1976?). Carstairs School Days. p. 9. 
  6. ^ Statistics Canada (Census 2006). "Carstairs - Community Profile". Retrieved 2007-06-10. 
  7. ^ "Didsbury/Carstairs Commuter". First Student Canada. Retrieved January 4, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Transportation". Town of Carstairs. Retrieved January 4, 2013. 

External links[edit]