David Myatt

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Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt after his conversion to Islam in 1998, wearing a Thawb and a Taqiyah (cap) (aka Kufi).

David Myatt (born 1950) – also known as David Wulstan Myatt[1] and formerly known as Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt[2] – is the founder of The Numinous Way,[3][4] a former British Muslim, and a former neo-nazi.

"A British iconoclast who has lived a somewhat itinerant life and has undertaken an equally desultory intellectual quest, Myatt is emblematic of the modern syncretism of radical ideologies",[5] and regarded as an "example of the axis between right-wing extremists and Islamists".[4][6] He has been described as one of the more interesting figures on the British neo-Nazi scene since the 1970s.[7][8][9][10]

Before his conversion to Islam in 1998,[11][12][13] Myatt was the first leader of the British National Socialist Movement (NSM),[3][14] and was identified by the British newspaper, The Observer, as the "ideological heavyweight" behind Combat 18.[15]

At a 2003 UNESCO conference in Paris, which concerned the growth of anti-Semitism, it was stated that "David Myatt, the leading hardline Nazi intellectual in Britain since the 1960s [...] has converted to Islam, praises bin Laden and al Qaeda, calls the 9/11 attacks 'acts of heroism,' and urges the killing of Jews. Myatt, under the name Abdul Aziz Ibn Myatt supports suicide missions and urges young Muslims to take up Jihad. Observers warn that Myatt is a dangerous man..."[16] This view of Myatt as a radical Muslim, or Jihadi,[17] is supported by Professor Robert S. Wistrich, who writes that Myatt, when a Muslim, was a staunch advocate of "Jihad, suicide missions and killing Jews..." and also "an ardent defender of bin Laden".[18] One of Myatt's writings justifying suicide attacks was, for several years, on the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades (the military wing) section of the Hamas website.[19]

Political scientist Professor George Michael writes that Myatt has "arguably done more than any other theorist to develop a synthesis of the extreme right and Islam".[20]

Myatt came to public attention in 1999, a year after his Islamic conversion, when a pamphlet he wrote many years earlier, A Practical Guide to Aryan Revolution, described as a "detailed step-by-step guide for terrorist insurrection",[21] was said to have inspired David Copeland, who left nailbombs in areas frequented by London's black, South Asian, and gay communities.[22] Three people died and 129 were injured in the explosions, several of them losing limbs.

Since 2010 Myatt has written extensively about his rejection of both Islam[23] and his extremist past,[24][25] writing that: "What I [...] came to understand, via pathei-mathos, was the importance - the human necessity, the virtue - of love, and how love expresses or can express the numinous in the most sublime, the most human, way. Of how extremism (of whatever political or religious or ideological kind) places some abstraction, some ideation, some notion of duty to some ideation, before a personal love, before a knowing and an appreciation of the numinous."[26]

In addition to writing about Islam and National Socialism, Myatt has translated works by Sophocles,[27] Sappho,[28] Aeschylus,[29] Homer,[30] translated and written a commentary on the Greek text of the Poimandres section of the Corpus Hermeticum,[31] and written several collections of poems.[32][33] He has also developed a mystical philosophy which he calls both The Numinous Way[34][35] and the Way of Pathei-Mathos,[36] and invented a three-dimensional board-game, the Star Game.[37]

Personal life[edit]

Myatt grew up in Tanzania, where his father worked as a civil servant for the British government, and later in the Far East, where he studied the martial arts.[20] He moved to England in 1967 to complete his schooling, and has said that he began a degree in physics but did not complete it, leaving his studies to focus on his political activism.[38] He is reported to live in the Midlands and to have been married three times.

In 2000, British anti-fascist magazine Searchlight wrote that: "He does not have the appearance of a Nazi ideologue ... [S]porting a long ginger beard, Barbour jacket, cords and a tweed flat cap, he resembles an eccentric country gentleman out for a Sunday ramble. But Myatt is anything but the country squire, for beneath this seemingly innocuous exterior is a man of extreme and calculated hatred. Over the past ten years, Myatt has emerged as the most ideologically driven nazi in Britain, preaching race war and terrorism [...] Myatt is believed to have been behind a 15-page document which called for race war, under the imprint White Wolves."[39]

According to Professor Jeffrey Kaplan, Myatt has undertaken "a global odyssey which took him on extended stays in the Middle East and East Asia, accompanied by studies of religions ranging from Christianity to Islam in the Western tradition and Taoism and Buddhism in the Eastern path. In the course of this Siddhartha-like search for truth, Myatt sampled the life of the monastery in both its Christian and Buddhist forms."[40]

Political scientist Professor George Michael has written that Myatt is an "intriguing theorist"[20] whose "Faustian quests"[20] not only involved studying Taoism and spending time in a Buddhist and later a Christian monastery,[41] but also allegedly involved exploring the occult, and Paganism and what Michael calls "quasi-Satanic" secret societies, while remaining a committed National Socialist.[41] Myatt is also alleged to have been the founder of the occult group the Order of Nine Angles (ONA/O9A) or to have taken it over[42] and written the publicly available teachings of the ONA under the pseudonym Anton Long.[43] According to Senholt, "ONA-inspired activities, led by protagonist David Myatt, managed to enter the scene of grand politics and the global 'War On Terror', because of several foiled terror plots in Europe that can be linked to Myatt's writings".[44] David Myatt has always denied such allegations about involvement with the ONA,[23][45][46] and using the pseudonym Anton Long.[47][48]

Political activism[edit]

Myatt joined Colin Jordan's British Movement, a neo-Nazi group, in 1968, where he sometimes acted as Jordan's bodyguard at meetings and rallies.[49] From the 1970s until the 1990s, he remained involved with paramilitary and neo-Nazi organisations such as Column 88 and Combat 18,[50][51] and was imprisoned twice for violent offences in connection with his political activism.[20]

Myatt was the founder and first leader of the National Socialist Movement[52][53] of which David Copeland was a member. He also co-founded, with Eddy Morrison, the neo-Nazi organization the NDFM (National Democratic Freedom Movement) which was active in Leeds, England, in the early 1970s,[54] and the neo-Nazi Reichsfolk group,[55][56] and which Reichsfolk organization "aimed to create a new Aryan elite, The Legion of Adolf Hitler, and so prepare the way for a golden age in place of 'the disgusting, decadent present with its dishonourable values and dis-honourable weak individuals'".[57]

Of the NDFM, John Tyndall wrote (in a polemic against NDFM co-founder Eddy Morrison): "The National Democratic Freedom Movement made little attempt to engage in serious politics but concentrated its activities mainly upon acts of violence against its opponents. [...] Before very long the NDFM had degenerated into nothing more than a criminal gang."[58] Myatt, writing in his autobiography Myngath, admits that during this time he did organize a small gang "whose aim was to liberate goods, fence them, and make some money with the initial intent of aiding our political struggle." Myatt was subsequently arrested in a raid by the Yorkshire Regional Crime Squad, and imprisoned for leading this gang.[23]

It is also alleged that in the early 1980s Myatt tried to establish a Nazi-occultist commune in Shropshire,[10][59] although Myatt denies this allegation, claiming that his aim was to establish an agrarian community solely based on the Nazi principles of Blood and Soil[23] and which project was advertised in Colin Jordan's Gothic Ripples newsletter,[60] with Goodrick-Clark writing that "after marrying and settling in Church Stretton in Shropshire, [Myatt] attempted in 1983 to set up a rural commune within the framework of Colin Jordan's Vanguard Project for neo-nazi utopias publicized in Gothic Ripples".[61]

Michael writes that Myatt took over the leadership of Combat 18 in 1998, when Charlie Sargent, the previous leader, was jailed for murder.[20]

Alleged influence on David Copeland[edit]

In November 1997, Myatt posted an allegedly racist and anti-Semitic pamphlet he had written called Practical Guide to Aryan Revolution on a website run out of British Columbia, Canada by Bernard Klatt. The pamphlet included chapter titles such as "Assassination", "Terror Bombing", and "Racial War".[62] According to Michael Whine of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, "[t]he contents provided a detailed step-by-step guide for terrorist insurrection with advice on assassination targets, rationale for bombing and sabotage campaigns, and rules of engagement."[21]

In February 1998, detectives from S012 Scotland Yard raided Myatt's home in Worcestershire and removed his computers and files. He was arrested on suspicion of incitement to murder and incitement to racial hatred,[23][63] but the case was dropped because the evidence supplied by the Canadian authorities was not enough to secure a conviction.[62]

It was this pamphlet that, in 1999, allegedly influenced[64] David Copeland, the London nailbomber - who was also a member of Myatt's National Socialist Movement - and who planted homemade bombs targeting immigrants in Brixton, Brick Lane, and inside the Admiral Duncan pub on Old Compton Street in London, frequented by the black, Asian, and gay communities respectively. Friends John Light, Nick Moore, and Andrea Dykes and her unborn child died in the Admiral Duncan pub. Copeland told police he had been trying to spark a "racial war."[14]

Following the conviction of Copeland for murder on June 30, 2000, after a trial at the Old Bailey, one newspaper wrote of Myatt: "This is the man who shaped mind of a bomber; Cycling the lanes around Malvern, the mentor who drove David Copeland to kill [...] Riding a bicycle around his Worcestershire home town sporting a wizard-like beard and quirky dress-sense, the former monk could easily pass as a country eccentric or off-beat intellectual. But behind David Myatt's studious exterior lies a more sinister character that has been at the forefront of extreme right-wing ideology in Britain since the mid-1960s."[65]

According to the BBC's Panorama, in 1998 when Myatt was leader of the NSM, he called for "the creation of racial terror with bombs."[66] Myatt is also quoted by Searchlight as having stated that "[t]he primary duty of all National Socialists is to change the world. National Socialism means revolution: the overthrow of the existing System and its replacement with a National-Socialist society. Revolution means struggle: it means war. It means certain tactics have to be employed, and a great revolutionary movement organised which is primarily composed of those prepared to fight, prepared to get their hands dirty and perhaps spill some blood" (Searchlight, July 2000).

Conversion to Islam[edit]

Myatt converted to Islam in 1998. He told Professor George Michael that his decision to convert began when he took a job on a farm in England. He was working long hours in the fields and felt an affinity with nature, concluding that the sense of harmony he felt had not come about by chance. He told Michael that he was also impressed by the militancy of Islamist groups, and believed that he shared common enemies with Islam, namely "the capitalist-consumer West and international finance."[67][68]

While, initially, some critics - specifically the anti-fascist Searchlight organization - suggested that Myatt's conversion "may be just a political ploy to advance his own failing anti-establishment agenda",[69] it is now generally accepted that his conversion was genuine.[70][71][72][73][74][75][76]

Following his conversion to Islam, Myatt dissociated himself from nationalism and racialism, and both as a Muslim and subsequently openly stated that racism is wrong.[77][78][79][80]

As a Muslim, he travelled and spoke in several Arab countries,[81] and wrote one of the most detailed defences in the English language of Islamic suicide attacks[82] - having become an advocate of such attacks[83][84][85][86] and defended the killing of civilians in such attacks.[87][88] He also expressed support for Osama bin Laden,[89] and the Taliban,[4] and referred to the Holocaust as a "hoax".[13] An April 2005 NATO workshop heard that Myatt had called on "all enemies of the Zionists to embrace the Jihad" against Jews and the United States.[90]

According to an article in The Times published on April 24, 2006, Myatt then believed that: "The pure authentic Islam of the revival, which recognises practical jihad as a duty, is the only force that is capable of fighting and destroying the dishonour, the arrogance, the materialism of the West ... For the West, nothing is sacred, except perhaps Zionists, Zionism, the hoax of the so-called Holocaust, and the idols which the West and its lackeys worship, or pretend to worship, such as democracy... Jihad is our duty. If nationalists, or some of them, desire to aid us, to help us, they can do the right thing, the honourable thing, and convert, revert, to Islam — accepting the superiority of Islam over and above each and every way of the West."[13]

Departure from Islam[edit]

In 2010, Myatt publicly announced that he had rejected Islam,[91] having developed his own weltanschauung,[35][36][92] writing that "the Way of Pathei-Mathos is an ethical, an interior, a personal, a non-political, a non-interfering, a non-religious but spiritual, way of individual reflexion, individual change, and empathic living, where there is an awareness of the importance of virtues such as compassion, humility, tolerance, gentleness, and love",[93] and that "living according to the way of pathei-mathos [...] means being compassionate or inclining toward compassion by trying to avoid causing, or contributing, to suffering".[93]

"The Numinous Way" and Pathei-Mathos[edit]

Myatt describes the Numinous Way as "the result of a four-decade long pathei-mathos and [...] the often difficult process of acknowledging my many personal mistakes",[94] and writes that it is an apolitical, and individual, way of life,[95] based on empathy and πάθει μάθος, pathei-mathos,[95] where race and the concept of the folk not only have no place[96] but are regarded as unethical abstractions.[35][95]

He defines pathei-mathos by saying: "The Greek term πάθει μάθος derives from The Agamemnon of Aeschylus (written c. 458 BCE), and can be interpreted, or translated, as meaning learning from adversary, or wisdom arises from (personal) suffering; or personal experience is the genesis of true learning."[97] Pathei-Mathos is thus an aspect of or element in the Numinous Way, although the former term comes to predominate over the latter in Myatt's writings beginning 2012.

Myatt writes that "the numinous sympathy – συμπάθεια (sympatheia, benignity) – with another living being that empathy provides naturally inclines us to treat other living beings as we ourselves would wish to be treated: with fairness, compassion, honour, and dignity. It also inclines us not to judge those whom we do not know; those beyond the purveu – beyond the range of – our faculty of empathy".[98]

Myatt links his Numinous Way to Hellenistic philosophy and places it in the Western philosophical tradition.[35][36]

Selected bibliography[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Some accounts give Myatt's middle name as William, such as the 1998 edition of Searchlight magazine [1] and Black Sun: Chapter "Nazi satanism and the new Aeon", Goodrick-Clarke, 2002. But, these accounts are seen as unreliable as the authors have allegedly never corresponded with Myatt. However, several authors did and confirm his middle name as Wulstan, namely Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy and Kaplan, Jeffrey. (1998) Nation and Race: The Developing Euro-American Racist Subculture, Northeastern University Press, 1998, ISBN 1-55553-331-0. Additionally, there is Myatt himself (q.v. his poetry and Greek translations).
  2. ^ Myatt originally changed his name to Abdul-Aziz (which he has penned articles under) but has been accused that he was trying to hide his identity so on the advice of an Imaam he added the ibn Myatt so people would know who he was.[2]
  3. ^ a b Langenohl, Andreas Langenohl & Westphal, Kirsten. (eds.) "Comparing and Inter-Relating the European Union and the Russian Federation", Zentrum für internationale Entwicklungs- und Umweltforschung der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, November 2006, p.84.
  4. ^ a b c Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, p. 142ff.
  5. ^ Jon B. Perdue: The War of All the People: The Nexus of Latin American Radicalism and Middle Eastern Terrorism. Potomac Books, 2012. p.70-71. ISBN 9781597977043
  6. ^ Mark Weitzman: Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung: Permanente Elemente des globalen Rechtsextremismus, in Thomas Greven: Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Die extremistische Rechte in der Ära der Globalisierung. 1 Auflage. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006, ISBN 3-531-14514-2, pp.61-64.
  7. ^ Arkadiusz Sołtysiak. Neopogaństwo i neonazizm: Kilka słów o ideologiach Davida Myatta i Varga Vikernesa. Antropologia Religii. Wybór esejów. Tom IV, (2010), s. 173-182
  8. ^ Agnieszka Pufelska: Der Faschismusbegiiff in Osteuropa nach 1945 in Die Dynamik der europäischen Rechten Geschichte, Kontinuitäten und Wandel. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, 2010. ISBN 978-3-531-17191-3
  9. ^ Jeffrey Kaplan (ed.). David Wulstan Myatt. In: Encyclopedia of White Power. A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, CA 2000, p. 216ff; p.514f
  10. ^ a b "Right here, right now", The Observer, February 9, 2003
  11. ^ Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, p. 147.
  12. ^ Greven, Thomas (ed) (2006) Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Rechtsextremismus in der Ära der Globalisierung. VS Verlag, p.62
  13. ^ a b c Woolcock, Nicola & Kennedy, Dominic. "What the neo-Nazi fanatic did next: switched to Islam", The Times, April 24, 2006.
  14. ^ a b Program Transcript: 'The Nailbomber'", BBC Panorama, June 30, 2000.
  15. ^ Barnett, Antony. "Right here, right now", The Observer, February 9, 2003.
  16. ^ Simon Wiesenthal Center: Response, Summer 2003, Vol 24, #2
  17. ^ Myatt was described by author Martin Amis as "a fierce Jihadi". The Second Plane. Jonathan Cape, 2008, p.157
  18. ^ Wistrich, Robert S, A Lethal Obsession: Anti-Semitism from Antiquity to the Global Jihad, Random House, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4000-6097-9
  19. ^ Durham, Martin. White Rage: The Extreme Right and American Politics. Routledge, 2007, p.113
  20. ^ a b c d e f Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, p. 142.
  21. ^ a b Whine, Michael. "Cyberspace: A New Medium for Communication, Command and Control by Extremists"
  22. ^ "Panorama Special: The Nailbomber", BBC, June 30, 2000.
  23. ^ a b c d e "Myngath - Some Recollections of A Wyrdful and Extremist Life". Retrieved 2013-02-06. 
  24. ^ "Understanding and Rejecting Extremism". Retrieved 2013-02-06. 
  25. ^ "De Novo Caelo". Retrieved 2012-06-25. 
  26. ^ "Pathei-Mathos - Genesis of My Unknowing". Retrieved 2012-06-25. 
  27. ^ J. Michael Walton: Found in Translation: Greek Drama in English, Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp.206, 221, 227
  28. ^ Gary Daher Canedo: Safo y Catulo: poesía amorosa de la antigüedad, Universidad Nur, 2005.
  29. ^ J. Michael Walton: Found in Translation: Greek Drama in English, Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp.206
  30. ^ Smith, S: Epic Logos, in Globalisation and its discontents, Boydell & Brewer, 2006
  31. ^ Myatt, David. Poemandres: A Translation and Commentary. 2014. ISBN 9781495470684
  32. ^ "Selected Poems". Retrieved 2012-06-25. 
  33. ^ One of Myatt's collection of poems is mentioned by former White House speech-writer Ben Coes in his novel Power Down ISBN 9780312580742
  34. ^ Senholt, Jacob C: Political Esotericism & the convergence of Radical Islam, Satanism and National Socialism in the Order of the Nine Angles. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Conference: Satanism in the Modern World, November 2009. [3]
  35. ^ a b c d "The Development of The Numinous Way". Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  36. ^ a b c "The Way of Πάθει Μάθος". Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  37. ^ Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke: Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press, 2002. p.219. ISBN 9780814731550
  38. ^ Myatt, David. "Towards Identity and the Galactic Empire". 2009-10-24.
  39. ^ Searchlight, July 2000.
  40. ^ Kaplan, Jeffrey (2000). Encyclopedia of white power: a sourcebook on the radical racist right. Rowman & Littlefield, p. 216ff; p.512f
  41. ^ a b Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, p. 143.
  42. ^ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun, NYU Press, 2002, p. 218.
  43. ^ Ryan, Nick. Into a World of Hate. Routledge, 2003, p. 54.
  44. ^ Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition, in Per Faxneld and Jesper Petersen (eds), The Devil's Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012. ISBN 9780199779246
  45. ^ Ryan, Nick. Into a World of Hate. Routledge, 2003, p. 53.
  46. ^ "Myatt and the ONA". Retrieved 2014-04-03. 
  47. ^ "The Ethos of Extremism". Retrieved 2014-04-03. 
  48. ^ Professor Kaplan in his Nation and Race: The Developing Euro-American Racist Subculture, Northeastern University Press, 1998, ISBN 1-55553-331-0 states that Myatt and Long are two different people, and that the individual who used the pseudonym Anton Long was a friend of Myatt's in the 1970s and 1980s. This view is supported by Michael Newton who, in his Ku Klux Klan: History, Organization, Language, Influence - published 2007 by McFarland & Co (Jefferson, N.C) ISBN 978-0-7864-2787-1 - wrote that "David Myatt, a British neo-Nazi [only] collaborated with leaders of a Satanist sect, the Order of the Nine Angles."
  49. ^ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. "Hitler's Priestess: Savitri Devi, the Hindu-Aryan Myth and Neo-Nazism", NYU Press, 2000, p.215
  50. ^ Goodrick-Clark, N. (2001) pp.215-217 Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity. (chapter 11 in particular)
  51. ^ Lowles, N. (2001) White Riot: The Violent Story of Combat 18. Milo Books, England; this edition 2003
  52. ^ Arkadiusz Sołtysiak. Neopogaństwo i neonazizm: Kilka słów o ideologiach Davida Myatta i Varga Vikernesa. Antropologia Religii. Wybór esejów. Tom IV, (2010), s. 173-182
  53. ^ Goodrick-Clark, N. (2001) p.50 Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity
  54. ^ Goodrick-Clark, N. (2001) p.217 Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity
  55. ^ Jeffrey Kaplan (ed.). David Wulstan Myatt. In: Encyclopedia of White Power. A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, CA 2000, p. 216ff; p.512f
  56. ^ Taguieff, Pierre-André. (2004). Prêcheurs de haine. Traversée de la judéophobie planétaire, Paris, Mille et une Nuits, "Essai", pp. 788-789
  57. ^ Goodrick-Clark, N. (2002) p.223. Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press. ISBN 0814731244
  58. ^ Spearhead"". April, 1983
  59. ^ The Promethean Peregrinations of David Myatt
  60. ^ Searchlight, #104 (February 1984) and #106 (April 1984(
  61. ^ Goodrick-Clark, N. (2002) p.222. Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press. ISBN 0814731244
  62. ^ a b Vacca, John R. "Computer Forensics: Computer Crime Scene Investigation", Charles River Media, 2005, p.420 ISBN 1-58450-389-0
  63. ^ "Cyberspace: A New Medium for Communication, Command and Control by Extremists". Retrieved 2011-05-05. 
  64. ^ Mark Weitzman: Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung: Permanente Elemente des globalen Rechtsextremismus, in Thomas Greven: Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Die extremistische Rechte in der Ära der Globalisierung. 1 Auflage. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006, ISBN 3-531-14514-2, pp.61-64.
  65. ^ Sunday Mercury, July 9, 2000
  66. ^ "Insert title here". BBC News. Retrieved 2006-05-01. 
  67. ^ Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, p. 144.
  68. ^ ibn Myatt, Abdul-Aziz "Autobiographical Notes", Revised Yaumul Ahad 3 Jumaada al-Awal 1428. 2009-10-24.
  69. ^ Amardeep Bassey (2003-02-16). "Midland Nazi turns to Islam". Birmingham Mail. Retrieved 2006-05-01. 
  70. ^ Miller, Rory (2007). British Anti-Zionism Then and Now. Covenant, Volume 1, Issue 2 (April 2007 / Iyar 5767), Herzliya, Israel.
  71. ^ "Common Motifs on Jihadi and Far Right Websites". Retrieved 2007-03-23. 
  72. ^ Steyn, Mark (2006). American Alone, Regnery Publishing, USA, p.92. ISBN 0-89526-078-6
  73. ^ Amis, Martin (2007-12-01). "No, I am not a racist". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2010-04-23. 
  74. ^ Amis, Martin. The Second Plane. Jonathan Cape, 2008, p.157
  75. ^ Alexandre Del Valle - The Reds, The Browns and the Greens or The Convergence of Totalitarianisms
  76. ^ http://www.quilliamfoundation.org/images/stories/pdfs/unlocking_al_qaeda.pdf
  77. ^ ibn Myatt, David Myatt: From Neo-Nazi to Muslim 2 Shaban 1428
  78. ^ ibn Myatt, Nationalism, Race, Culture and Islam 28 Jumaadi Al-Thaani 1425
  79. ^ "Concerning Extremism and Race". Retrieved 2012-06-25. 
  80. ^ "Race and The Numinous Way". Retrieved 2012-06-25. 
  81. ^ Mark Weitzmann, Anti-Semitism and Terrorism, in Dienel, Hans-Liudger (ed), Terrorism and the Internet: Threats, Target Groups, Deradicalisation Strategies. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series, vol. 67. IOS Press, 2010. pp.16-17. ISBN 978-1-60750-536-5
  82. ^ Mark Weitzmann, Anti-Semitism and Terrorism, in Dienel, Hans-Liudger (ed), Terrorism and the Internet: Threats, Target Groups, Deradicalisation Strategies. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series, vol. 67. IOS Press, 2010. pp.16-17. ISBN 978-1-60750-536-5
  83. ^ "Questions Regarding Martyrdom Operations". Retrieved 2012-09-23. 
  84. ^ "In Reply to Sheikh Salman bin Fahd al-Oadah". Retrieved 2012-09-23. 
  85. ^ "Are Martyrdom Operations Lawful (According to Quran and Sunnah)?". Retrieved 2012-09-23. 
  86. ^ where he states: "In respect of Sheikh Abu Baseer at-Tartusi, I incline toward the view that he might be mistaken in some of the things he has said, especially in relation to martyrdom operations in Dar al-Harb. For instance, he has spoken about some such operations being haram because they can or might or have resulted in the death of "innocent" people, and involve the Mujahid in "suicide". I have written several articles striving to express the view that I myself incline toward - such as "Thinking Like a Muslim" and "Are Martyrdom Operations Lawful According to Quran and Sunnah?" (the publication of which on the muslimcreed website was, I believe, one of causes which led the kuffar to close down that site) - which view of mine is that such operations are legitimate, according to Quran and Sunnah, and that it is an error to apply the terms and concepts of the kuffar, such as "innocent" and "civilian", to Deen Al-Islam, and that using such terms amounts to an imitation of the kuffar."
  87. ^ "Deen Al-Islam and the Question of Civilians". Retrieved 2012-09-23. 
  88. ^ ibn Myatt Thinking Like A Muslim, In Reply to Sheikh Salman b. Fahd al-Oadah, Concerning Al Aqd Al Amaan: Covenants of Security
  89. ^ ibn Myatt, Abdul-Aziz - "Why I Support Sheikh Usama bin Laden (Hafidhaullah)", 18 Thul-Hujja 1423. 2009-10-24.
  90. ^ Karmon, Ely. "The Middle East, Iran, Palestine: Arenas for Radical and Anti-Globalization Groups Activity".
  91. ^ Myngath - Some Recollections of the Wyrdful Life of David Myatt, Thormynd Press, 2010 ISBN 978-0-557-56804-8
  92. ^ The Promethean Peregrinations of David Myatt
  93. ^ a b Conspectus of The Philosophy of Pathei-Mathos
  94. ^ "The Numinous Way of David Myatt". Retrieved 2011-09-17. 
  95. ^ a b c "Recuyle of the Philosophy of Pathei-Mathos". Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  96. ^ "Race, Folk, and Clan". Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  97. ^ "Pathei-Mathos The Greek term πάθει μάθος derives from The Agamemnon of Aeschylus (written c. 458 BCE), and can be interpreted, or translated, as meaning learning from adversary, or wisdom arises from (personal) suffering; or personal experience is the genesis of true learning. When understood in its Aeschylean context, it implies that for we human beings pathei-mathos possesses a numinous, a living, authority. That is, the understanding that arises from one’s own personal experience – from formative experiences that involve some hardship, some grief, some personal suffering – is often or could be more valuable to us (more alive, more relevant, more meaningful) than any doctrine, than any religious faith, than any words/advice one might hear from someone else or read in some book. Thus, pathei-mathos, like empathy, offers we human beings a certain conscious understanding, a knowing; and, when combined, pathei-mathos and empathy are or can be a guide to wisdom, to a particular conscious knowledge concerning our own nature (our physis), our relation to Nature, and our relation to other human beings, leading to an appreciation of the numinous and an appreciation of virtues such as humility and εὐταξία." http://perceiverations.wordpress.com/about-2/some-terms-explained/
  98. ^ "Summary of the Philosophy of Pathei-Mathos". 

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. (2001) Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press ISBN 0-8147-3124-4 ISBN 0-8147-3155-4 (Paperback)
  • Kaplan, J. (1998) "Religiosity and the Radical Right: Toward the Creation of a New Ethnic Identity" in Kaplan and Tore Bjørgo (eds.) Nation and Race: The Developing Euro-American Racist Subculture, Northeastern University Press, 1998, ISBN 1-55553-331-0.
  • Kaplan, J. (ed) (2000) Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc., 2000; AltaMira Press. ISBN 0-7425-0340-2 pp. 216ff; pp. 235ff; pp. 512ff
  • Lowles, Nick. (2003) White Riot: The Violent Story of Combat 18. Milo Books ISBN 1-903854-00-8
  • McLagan, Graeme. (2003) Killer on the Streets. John Blake Publishing. ISBN 1-904034-33-0
  • Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas
  • Ryan, Nick. (2003) Homeland: Into A World of Hate. Mainstream Publishing Company Ltd. ISBN 1-84018-465-5
  • Sołtysiak, Arkadiusz. Neopogaństwo i neonazizm: Kilka słów o ideologiach Davida Myatta i Varga Vikernesa. Antropologia Religii. Wybór esejów. Tom IV, (2010), s. 173-182
  • Weitzman, Mark: Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung: Permanente Elemente des globalen Rechtsextremismus, in Thomas Greven: Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Die extremistische Rechte in der Ära der Globalisierung. 1 Auflage. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006, ISBN 3-531-14514-2

External links[edit]