Nova Scotia Highway 104

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Highway 104 shield Highway 104 shield

Highway 104
Miners Memorial Highway
Trans-Canada Highway
Route information
Maintained by Nova Scotia Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal
Length: 322 km[citation needed] (200 mi)
Existed: 1970[citation needed] – present
Major junctions
West end: Route 2 (TCH) towards Moncton, NB
  Hwy 102 near Truro
Hwy 106 (TCH) near New Glasgow
Hwy 105 (TCH) near Port Hawkesbury
East end: Trunk 4 near St. Peter's
Highway system

Provincial highways in Nova Scotia

Hwy 103 Hwy 105 (TCH)

Highway 104 in Nova Scotia, Canada, runs from Fort Lawrence at the New Brunswick border near Amherst to River Tillard near St. Peter's. Except for the portion on Cape Breton Island between Port Hawkesbury and St. Peter's, it is part of the Trans-Canada Highway.

Highway 104 mostly supplants the former route of Trunk 4. In 1970, all sections of Trunk 4 west of New Glasgow were renumbered, although the number was added back in the Mount Thom and Wentworth Valley areas in the 1990s when new alignments of Highway 104 opened to traffic.

The provincial government named the highway the Miners Memorial Highway on 8 September 2008 one month before the 50th anniversary of the Springhill Mining Disaster of 23 October 1958.[1]

Route[edit]

Highway 104 outside Westville, Nova Scotia (Exit 21).

The highway's present alignment measures 322 kilometres (200 mi) long, of which the western 180 km (110 mi) between the inter-provincial border with New Brunswick at Fort Lawrence through to Sutherlands River is a 4-lane divided freeway. The eastern 142 kilometres (88 mi) from Sutherlands River to River Tillard is a mixture of 2-lane controlled access freeway known as a Super 2, uncontrolled access 2-lane highway, and 4-lane divided freeway sections.

KM 0 to 48

From the inter-provincial border at Fort Lawrence, the highway runs east for 48 kilometres (30 mi) past the towns of Amherst and Oxford to Thomson Station. This section had been built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and was upgraded to a 4-lane divided freeway that opened in 1993. It has a posted speed limit of 110 kilometres per hour (68 mph).

KM 48 to 93

From Thomson Station the highway runs southeast for 45 kilometres (28 mi) to Masstown. This is a tolled section built as a 4-lane divided freeway and known as the Cobequid Pass Toll Highway which opened on 15 November 1997. It has a posted speed limit of 110 kilometres per hour (68 mph) throughout, except for a posted speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour (31 mph) between KM 72 and 73 at the toll booth.

The Highway 104 Western Alignment Corporation was created by a provincial statute, the Highway 104 Western Alignment Act, whose sole purpose was to finance, design, construct, operate and maintain this new alignment of highway. The Cobequid Pass Toll Highway was built with CAD $66 million in private financing (from CIT Financial) and CAD $27.5 million from the Government of Nova Scotia and CAD $27.5 million from the Government of Canada.[2] The private financing loan is being paid back through tolls collected at a toll booth located between KM 72 and 73 in Londonderry, Colchester County.

Prior to this new alignment, Highway 104 ran east from Thomson Station for 53 kilometres (33 mi) to Masstown on the present alignment of Trunk 4 through the Wentworth Valley. This 2-lane uncontrolled access section included climbing Folly Mountain and was nicknamed "The Valley of Death" due to an increasing number of accidents with a high fatality rate that were occurring in the early to mid 1990s; it was political pressure resulting from these accidents that forced the cash-strapped provincial government to pursue toll financing for the realignment section known as the Cobequid Pass.

KM 93 to 180

From Masstown, the highway runs east and northeast for 87 kilometres (54 mi) past the towns of Truro, Westville, Stellarton and New Glasgow to Sutherlands River. This section is a 4-lane divided freeway and has a posted speed limit of 110 kilometres per hour (68 mph). It was upgraded in various stages as follows:

  • KM 93 to 145, section from Masstown to Salt Springs had been built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and was upgraded to a 4-lane divided freeway that opened in the early 1990s.
  • KM 145 to 160, section from Salt Springs to Westville Road was built as a new alignment of 4-lane divided freeway that opened in the late 1990s. Prior to this new alignment opening, Highway 104 ran east on the present alignment of Trunk 4.
  • KM 160 to 167, section from Westville Road to Plymouth had been built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and was upgraded to a 4-lane divided freeway that opened in the early 1990s.
  • KM 167 to 175, section from Plymouth to Pine Tree had been built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and was upgraded to a 4-lane divided freeway that opened in fall 2011.
  • KM 175 to 180, section from Pine Tree to Sutherlands River had been built in the 1960s as an uncontrolled access highway (formerly Trunk 4) and was upgraded to a 4-lane divided freeway that opened in fall 2012.
KM 180 to 197

From the end of the 4-lane divided freeway section at Sutherlands River, the highway runs east for 17 kilometres (11 mi) to Barney's River Station. This section was built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and remains as a controlled access highway with dedicated passing lanes and has a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph).

KM 197 to 209

From the end of the Super 2 section at Barney's River Station, the highway runs southeast for 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) to James River. This section had been built in the 1960s as an uncontrolled access highway (formerly Trunk 4) and remains as an uncontrolled access highway with a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph).

KM 209 to 217

From the end of the uncontrolled access section at James River, the highway runs east for 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) to Addington Forks. This section was built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and remains as a controlled access highway with a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph).

KM 217 to 228

From the end of the Super 2 section at Addington Forks, the highway runs east for 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) to South River Road. This section was built as a new alignment of 4-lane divided freeway that opened on 19 September 2012 and has a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph). Prior to this new alignment opening, Highway 104 ran east on the present alignment of Trunk 4 and Post Road in the town of Antigonish and included three intersections controlled by traffic lights.

KM 228 to 235

From the end of the 4-lane divided freeway section at South River Road, the highway runs east for 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) to Dagger Woods. This section had been built in the 1960s as an uncontrolled access highway (formerly Trunk 4) and remains as an uncontrolled access highway with a posted speed limit of 60 kilometres per hour (37 mph) to 80 kilometres per hour (50 mph). A 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) alignment of 4-lane divided freeway is under construction that will bypass this uncontrolled access section with an estimated completion date in 2014.

KM 235 to 239

From the end of the uncontrolled access section at Dagger Woods, the highway runs east for 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) to Pomquet Forks. This section was built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and remains as a controlled access highway with a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph), although there are several at-grade intersections.

KM 239 to 242

From the end of the Super 2 section at Pomquet Forks, the highway runs east for 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) to Heatherton. This section had been built in the 1960s as an uncontrolled access highway (formerly Trunk 4) and remains as an uncontrolled access highway with a posted speed limit of 90 kilometres per hour (56 mph).

KM 242 to 271

From the end of the uncontrolled access section at Heatherton, the highway runs east for 29 kilometres (18 mi) to the western end of Auld's Cove. This section was built in the 1960s as a Super 2 and remains as a controlled access highway with a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph).

KM 271 to 274

From the end of the Super 2 section at the western end of Auld's Cove, the highway runs east for 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) to the western end of the Canso Causeway. This section had been built in the 1960s as an uncontrolled access highway (formerly Trunk 4) and remains as an uncontrolled access highway with a posted speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph).

KM 274 to 276

From the end of the uncontrolled access section at the eastern end of Auld's Cove, the highway runs east for 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) across the Strait of Canso on the Canso Causeway to Port Hasting. This section was opened in 1955 as a controlled access highway and has a posted speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph).

At Port Hastings, the speed limit drops to 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph) approaching a roundabout where the highway interchanges with Trunk 4, Trunk 19 and Highway 105. Highway 105 proceeds east carrying the Trans-Canada Highway designation.

KM 276 to 288

From the roundabout at Port Hastings, the highway is unsigned for 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) as it follows Trunk 4 through Port Hastings and the town of Port Hawkesbury. The posted speed limit is 50 kilometres per hour (31 mph) and includes multiple intersections controlled by traffic lights. The highway reappears at the Exit 43 interchange for Trunk 4 in Melville (just north of Port Hawkesbury).

A Highway 104 bypass from Port Hastings to Melville has been proposed in the past. Concept designs have shown a new alignment of 4-lane freeway being built around the northwest side of Port Hastings, crossing Highway 105 at a new interchange near an electrical substation. The new alignment of Highway 104 would proceed east and then southeast approximately following a power line corridor to the Exit 43 interchange in Melville.

KM 288 to 322

From the end of the uncontrolled access / unsigned section at Melville (just outside Port Hawkesbury), the highway runs east for 34 kilometres (21 mi) to its current eastern terminus at an at-grade interchange with Trunk 4 in River Tillard (near St. Peters). This section was built in the 1970s as a Super 2 and remains as a controlled access highway with a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph).

KM 322 EAST

An extension of Highway 104 from River Tillard to Sydney River has been proposed in the past. The Nova Scotia provincial government has designated the entire length of Highway 104 from Fort Lawrence to River Tillard as a "strategic highway" to qualify for federal cost-sharing of maintenance and future upgrades. This designation has also been applied to the remaining Trunk 4 corridor in Cape Breton along the south shore of Bras d'Or Lake from St. Peters to Sydney River. It is eventually envisioned that the Trans-Canada Highway will follow the entire length of Highway 104 from Amherst to Sydney River as a 4-lane freeway, upgraded from the existing two-lane freeway and uncontrolled access sections of the highway.

Exit list[edit]

Kilometre distances[citation needed] are approximate.

Location km # Destinations Notes
Fort Lawrence 1 1 Trunk 2 (Laplanche Street) to Trunk 6 – Amherst, Fort Lawrence
Amherst 5 3 Trunk 6 (Victoria Street, Sunrise Trail) – Amherst, Tatamagouche, Amherst
7 4 Trunk 2 (South Albion Street) – Amherst, Springhill, Parrsboro
Salt Springs Station 30 5 Hwy 142 – Springhill, Parrsboro
Oxford 40 6 Route 321 to Route 204 / Route 301 – Oxford, Pugwash, River Philip
Thomson Station 49 7 Trunk 4 – Mahoney's Corner, Wentworth, Folly Lake, Thomson Station
Atkinson 59 8 To Trunk 4 / Wentworth-Collingwood Road – Westchester Station, Collingwood
Great Village 83 10 To Trunk 2 / Trunk 4 – Great Village, Bass River, Londonderry
Glenholme 89 11 Trunk 4 to Trunk 2 – Glenholme, Economy, Five Islands, Folly Lake, Wentworth
Masstown 93 12 Trunk 2 / Trunk 4 west – Masstown, Glenholme, Lower Debert West end of Trunk 4 overlap
Lower Onslow, Debert 98 13 Debert, Lower Onslow
Onslow 107 15 Hwy 102 south – Truro, Halifax Regional Municipality Only exit to Halifax
Valley 116 17 To Route 311 (Trunk 4 east) – Bible Hill, Truro, Tatamagouche East end of Trunk 4 overlap
Kemptown 126 18 Stevens Cross Road - Kemptown, Riversdale
Mount Thom 133 18A Trunk 4 – Mount Thom
Salt Springs 146 19 Route 376 - Trunk 4 – Salt Springs, Central West River, Durham
Alma 155 20 To Trunk 4 – Pleasant Valley, Greenhill, Union Centre
Westville 159 21 Trunk 4 west to Route 289 / Cowan Street – Alma, Westville West end of Trunk 4 overlap
Mount William 161 22 Hwy 106 (TCH) – Pictou, Trenton, P.E.I. Ferry
New Glasgow 164 23 Trunk 4 / Route 289 – New Glasgow, Westville, Trenton
New Glasgow, Stellarton 165 24 Route 374- New Glasgow, Stellarton, Trenton
New Glasgow, Plymouth 167 25 Route 348- East River Road, Trunk 4 New Glasgow, Stellarton, Trenton
Thorburn 170 26 Route 348- to Trunk 4 – Thorburn, Sherbrooke
Sutherlands River 178 27 Trunk 4, Route 245
Barney's River Station 198 29 Trunk 4 west West end of Trunk 4 overlap; at-grade
Marshy Hope 204 Trunk 4 east East end of Trunk 4 overlap; at-grade
James River 210 30 To Trunk 4 / Beaver Mountain Road – James River, Brierly Brook
Antigonish, Addington Forks 219 31 Trunk 4 - Addington Forks, James River, Brierly Brook
Antigonish 222 32 Trunk 7 - Lochaber, Sherbrooke, Eastern Shore, Sheet Harbour
224 33 Beech Hill Road
Antigonish/

South River Road

226 34 Trunk 4 west - Antigonish, South River Road West end of Trunk 4 overlap; at-grade
Lower South River 230 35 Route 316 - St. Andrews, Guysborough, Goshen At-Grade
Heatherton 238 36 Summerside Road At-grade
240 36A Trunk 4 east East end of Trunk 4 overlap; at-grade
Monastery 252 37 Trunk 4 to Trunk 16 – Monastery, Guysborough, Tracadie
Havre Boucher 262 38 Havre Boucher, Frankville, Linwood
Auld's Cove 271 39 Trunk 4 west West end of Trunk 4 overlap; at-grade
272 40 Route 344 At-grade
Port Hastings 276 41 Hwy 105 (TCH) east / Trunk 4 east / Trunk 19 north Signs used as Exit 1 (Highway 105).
Melville 288 43 Trunk 4 – Port Hawkesbury, Point Tupper, Cleveland, Dundee East end of Trunk 4 overlap
Lower River Inhabitants 293 44 Lower River Road, Port Malcolm Road at-grade
Evanston 295 45 Evanston Road, Whiteside Road at-grade
Louisdale 306 46 Route 320
Cannes 316 47 Sporting Mountain Road
River Tillard 322 48 Trunk 4 – St. Peter's, River Bourgeois, Cape George

References[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing

Preceded by
NB Route 2
Trans-Canada Highway
Highway 104
Succeeded by
Highway 105
Preceded by
Highway 106