Amateur-satellite service

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First amateur-satellite station OSCAR 1, 1961
Amateur-satellite station OSCAR 10, 1983
Doug Wheelock, KF5BOC, flight engineer of the Expedition 24, uses a ham radio system in the Zvezda Service Module of the ISS, 2010

Amateur-satellite service (also: amateur-satellite radiocommunication service) is – according to Article 1.57 of the International Telecommunication Union´s (ITU) Radio Regulations (RR)[1] – defined as «A radiocommunication service using space stations on earth satellites for the same purposes as those of the amateur service

See also

Classification[edit]

This radiocommunication service is classified in accordance with ITU Radio Regulations (article 1) as follows:
Radiocommunication service (article 1.19)

Frequency allocation[edit]

The allocation of radio frequencies is provided according to Article 5 of the ITU Radio Regulations (edition 2012).[2]

In order to improve harmonisation in spectrum utilisation, the majority of service-allocations stipulated in this document were incorporated in national Tables of Frequency Allocations and Utilisations which is within the responsibility of the appropriate national administration. The allocation might be primary, secondary, exclusive, and shared.

  • primary allocation: is indicated by writing in capital letters (see example below)
  • secondary allocation: is indicated by small letters (see example below)
  • exclusive or shared utilization: is within the responsibility of national administrations
Example of frequency allocation
Allocation to services
     Region 1             Region 2             Region 3       
135.7–137.8 kHz
FIXED
MARITIME MOBILE
Amateur
135.7–137.8
FIXED
MARITIME MOBILE
Amateur
135.7–137.8
FIXED
MARITIME MOBILE
RADIO NAVIGATION
Amateur
7 000–7 100   AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
14 000–14 250    AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
18 068–18 168    AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
21 000–21 450    AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
24 890–24 990    AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
28–29.7 MHz       AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
144–146              AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
5 830–5 850
FIXED-SATELLITE
(space-to-Earth)
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
(space-to-Earth)
5 830–5 850
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
(space-to-Earth)


10.5–10.6 GHz    AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
24–24.05             AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
47–47.2              AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
76–77.5               RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIOLOCATIONY
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
Space research (space-to-Earth)
77.5–78               AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
Radio astronomy
Space research (space-to-Earth)
78–79                  RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
Radio astronomy
Space research (space-to-Earth)
79–81                 RADIOLOCATION
RADIO ASTRONOMY
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
Space research (space-to-Earth)
134–136              AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
Radio astronomy
136–141              RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
241–248              RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
248–250              AMATEUR
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
Radio astronomy


Additional Amateur Satellite Service Allocations[edit]

In addition to the formal allocations in the main table such as above, there is also a key ITU-R footnote RR 5.282 that provides for additional allocations:-

5.282 In the bands 435-438 MHz, 1 260-1 270 MHz, 2 400-2 450 MHz, 3 400-3 410 MHz (in Regions 2 and 3 only)
and 5 650-5 670 MHz, the amateur-satellite service may operate subject to not causing harmful interference to other
services operating in accordance with the Table (see No. 5.43). Administrations authorizing such use shall ensure that
any harmful interference caused by emissions from a station in the amateur-satellite service is immediately eliminated
in accordance with the provisions of No. 25.11. The use of the bands 1 260-1 270 MHz and 5 650-5 670 MHz by the
amateur-satellite service is limited to the Earth-to-space direction.


Of these, the 435-438 MHz band is particularly popular for amateur/educational small satellies such as Cubesats.

References / sources[edit]

  1. ^ ITU Radio Regulations, Section IV. Radio Stations and Systems – Article 1.57, definition: amateur-satellite service / amateur-satellite radiocommunication service
  2. ^ ITU Radio Regulations, CHAPTER II – Frequencies, ARTICLE 5 Frequency allocations, Section IV – Table of Frequency Allocations