Hemp milk

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Carton of unsweetened, unflavored hemp milk

Hemp milk, or hemp seed milk, is a plant milk made from hemp seeds that are soaked and ground in water. The result resembles milk in color, texture, and flavor. Hemp is conducive to being organically grown and labeled. Plain hemp milk may be sweetened or flavored.

Production[edit]

Production of hemp milk requires hemp seeds, water, and a blender. Many recipes call for ground vanilla or vanilla extract to add flavor, and a type of sweetener. Once all the ingredients are blended together, some people pour the hemp milk through a cheesecloth and strainer to get a smoother and more refined milky texture, but this process is optional.

Use in coffee[edit]

In coffee culture, hemp milk is said to produce better latte art and to have a texture more like cow's milk, compared to soy milk.[1]

Nutrition[edit]

In a 100 millilitres (3.5 imp fl oz; 3.4 US fl oz) serving, hemp milk provides 46 calories from 3 g of carbohydrates, 3 g of fat and 2 g of protein.[2] Hemp milk contains no micronutrients in significant amounts.[2] Although there is limited history of making hemp milk, hemp seeds have been eaten for longer, and hemp milk appears to be safe for those concerned about soy or milk allergies.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rose Tosti (February 28, 2011), "Hip Hemp at Neptune Coffee in Greenwood", Seattle Weekly
  2. ^ a b "Hemp Milk (Hemp Bliss original flavor; custom analysis) per 100 ml (g)". Nutritiondata.com. Conde Nast. 2014. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  3. ^ Myrna Chandler Goldstein and Mark A. Goldstein M.D. (2009), Food and Nutrition Controversies Today: A Reference Guide, ABC-CLIO, p. 162, ISBN 9780313354038