I'll Get By (As Long as I Have You)

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"I'll Get By (As Long as I Have You)" is a popular song with music by Fred E. Ahlert and lyrics by Roy Turk. It was published in 1928 and popular versions in 1929 were by Ruth Etting, Nick Lucas and by Aileen Stanley.[1]

The song was revived to even greater success in 1944, when the 1940 recording by Harry James (Dick Haymes vocal) was re-released (during the 1942–44 musicians' strike, which prevented recording of new material)[2] (Billboard #1). The Ink Spots' version featuring lead tenor Bill Kenny was also popular in 1944, reaching the retail top ten. A version by the King Sisters also charted in 1944 with a peak position of No. 12. The song was included in Variety's "10 Best Sellers on Coin-Machines" for the week of June 21, 1944.[3] The song was also included on The Lucky Strike Parade's Top Ten for 1944.[4] A 1944 Billboard poll found that "I'll Get By" was the third most sold sheet music among GIs stationed in training camps and in Europe.[5]

Other notable recordings[edit]

Film appearances[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

This song was interpreted by Marilyn Monroe during one of her lessons in the Actors Studio. According to some, Monroe's performance caused a member of the audience to cry, which convinced some observers of her acting ability.[citation needed]

This song is not to be confused with "I'll Get By," the 1991 hit ballad by Eddie Money.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 521. ISBN 0-89820-083-0. 
  2. ^ Gilliland, John (1994). Pop Chronicles the 40s: The Lively Story of Pop Music in the 40s (audiobook). ISBN 978-1-55935-147-8. OCLC 31611854.  Tape 1, side B.
  3. ^ Smith, Kathleen E.R. God Bless America: Tin Pan Alley Goes to War. The University Press of Kentucky. p. 138. ISBN 0-8131-2256-2. 
  4. ^ Smith, Kathleen E.R. God Bless America: Tin Pan Alley Goes to War. The University Press of Kentucky. p. 140. ISBN 0-8131-2256-2. 
  5. ^ Smith, Kathleen E.R. God Bless America: Tin Pan Alley Goes to War. The University Press of Kentucky. p. 167. ISBN 0-8131-2256-2. 
  6. ^ "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  7. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  8. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved August 28, 2017. 
  9. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  10. ^ "Marv Goldberg's R&B Notebooks - PLATTERS". Uncamarvy.com. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  11. ^ "The Platters - I'll Get By (Vinyl)". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  12. ^ British Hit Singles & Albums (18th ed.). Guinness World Records. 2005. p. 197. ISBN 1-904994-00-8. 
  13. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  14. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  15. ^ British Hit Singles & Albums (18th ed.). Guinness World Records. 2005. p. 52. ISBN 1-904994-00-8. 
  16. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  17. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  18. ^ "Al (He's The King) Hirt* - They're Playing Our Song (Vinyl, LP, Album)". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  19. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  20. ^ "Internet Movie Database". imdb.com. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
Preceded by
"I Love You"
by Bing Crosby with John Scott Trotter and His Orchestra

I'll Be Seeing You"
by Bing Crosby with John Scott Trotter and His Orchestra
The Billboard National Best Selling Retail Records number-one single
(Harry James and His Orchestra version)

June 10 – June 24, 1944 (three weeks)
July 8, 1944 (one week)
Succeeded by
"I'll Be Seeing You"
by Bing Crosby with John Scott Trotter and His Orchestra

I'll Be Seeing You"
by Bing Crosby with John Scott Trotter and His Orchestra