Iceland national football team

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Iceland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Strákarnir okkar (Our Boys)
AssociationFootball Association of Iceland (KSÍ)
Knattspyrnusamband Íslands
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachArnar Viðarsson
CaptainAron Gunnarsson
Most capsBirkir Bjarnason (113)
Top scorerEiður Guðjohnsen
Kolbeinn Sigþórsson (26)
Home stadiumLaugardalsvöllur
FIFA codeISL
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 62 Increase 1 (6 October 2022)[1]
Highest18 (February–March 2018)
Lowest131 (April–June 2012)
First international
Unofficial
 Faroe Islands 0–1 Iceland 
(Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; 29 July 1930)[2]
Official
 Iceland 0–3 Denmark 
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 17 July 1946)[3]
Biggest win
Unofficial
 Iceland 9–0 Faroe Islands 
(Keflavík, Iceland; 10 July 1985)
Official
 Iceland 5–0 Malta 
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 27 July 2000)[4]
Biggest defeat
 Denmark 14–2 Iceland 
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 23 August 1967)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2018)
Best resultGroup stage (2018)
UEFA European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2016)
Best resultQuarter-finals (2016)

The Iceland national football team (in Icelandic: Íslenska karlalandsliðið í knattspyrnu) represents Iceland in men's international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of Iceland, and have been a FIFA member since 1947 and an UEFA member since 1957. The team's nickname is Strákarnir okkar, which means Our Boys in Icelandic.

The team has enjoyed success in the second half of the 2010s. In the qualifying rounds for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, Iceland reached the playoffs before losing to Croatia. Iceland reached its first major tournament, UEFA Euro 2016, after a qualification campaign which included home and away wins over the Netherlands. After advancing to the knockout stages of Euro 2016, Iceland defeated England in the Round of 16, advancing to the quarter-finals, where they lost to host nation France 5–2. They became the smallest nation by population to ever clinch a FIFA World Cup berth when they qualified for the 2018 tournament on 9 October 2017.[6] They drew with Argentina in their opening match, but nonetheless still went out in the group stage.[7][8]

History[edit]

20th century[edit]

Although Úrvalsdeild, the Icelandic Football League, was founded in 1912,[9] the country's first international match was played on 29 July 1930, against the Faroe Islands.[10] Although Iceland won 1–0 away, both teams were at the time unaffiliated with FIFA.[11] The first match officially recognised by FIFA took place in Reykjavík on 17 July 1946, a 0–3 loss to their future rivals Denmark.[12] The first international victory was against Finland in 1947.[13] For the first 20 years of the Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ)'s existence, the team mostly did not participate in qualifying for the FIFA World Cup or the UEFA European Championship. In 1954, Iceland applied to take part in qualification for the 1954 World Cup, but the application was rejected.[10] In qualification for the 1958 World Cup, Iceland finished last in their group with zero wins, conceding 26 goals![10]

In 1980, Iceland won the first edition of the friendly tournament known as the Greenland Cup.[14]

Since 1974, the team has taken part in qualifying for every World Cup and European Championship. In 1994, the team reached their then best ever position in the FIFA World Rankings, 37th. This record stood until 2016 when they managed to reach 21st.[15] In a friendly against Estonia on 24 April 1996 in Tallinn, Eiður Smári Guðjohnsen entered as a substitute for his father Arnór. This marked the first time that a father and son played in the same international match.[16]

21st century[edit]

Iceland national football team at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Rostov-on-Don, Russia

In qualification for Euro 2004, Iceland finished third in their group, one point behind Scotland.[17] As a result, they failed to qualify for a playoff spot.[18]

However, the following qualifying campaigns will be much more difficult for Iceland which will flirt with the last places of its respective groups, in particular during the Euro 2008 qualifiers where despite two unexpected successes against Northern Ireland (3–0 in the opening away, 2–1 at home in the return) and a heroic resistance in the first and second leg against the Spanish future winners of the competition (a 1–1 draw at home after having led the score and a short 0–1 defeat away), Our boys suffered several other heavy defeats, including two against Latvia, who had qualified for Euro 2004 as a surprise (0–4 away, 2–4 home), and one against Liechtenstein (0–3 away, after a 1–1 home draw).

The reasons for the lack of results of the selection were due to the absence of professionals on the island, the Icelanders played soccer for fun. Moreover, the hostile climate where winter lasts 8 months did not help the development of the sport, there were only two synthetic fields forcing the footballers to train on the gravel or in the snow. In the 2000s, Icelandic soccer will experience a real revolution. The economic boom will allow the authorities to create important structures with indoor pitches in synthetic turf, which results in the practice of soccer all year round without worrying about the weather conditions outside. These new structures encourage young people to turn to sports and even lead to a decrease in alcohol and tobacco consumption among teenagers.[19]

In 2014, Iceland almost secured qualification for their first World Cup.[20] Finishing second in Group D, they played Croatia in a two-leg playoff for qualification.[21][22] After holding them to a 0–0 draw in the home leg, they lost 2–0 away.[23]

Euro 2016[edit]

Iceland qualified for a major tournament for the first time in 2015 after finishing second in Group A of qualification for Euro 2016, losing only two games, and beating the Netherlands – which had finished third in the 2014 World Cup – twice.[24] During the qualification, they reached their then highest ranking in the FIFA World Rankings, 23rd.[25][26] Iceland were drawn into a group with Portugal, Hungary and Austria for the final tournament.

At the tournament finals, Iceland recorded 1–1 draws in their first two group stage matches against Portugal and Hungary. They then advanced from their group with a 2–1 victory against Austria.[27] Iceland qualified for the tournament's quarter-finals after a 2–1 upset win over England in the Round of 16, which led to England manager Roy Hodgson resigning in disgrace immediately after the final whistle.[28] However, they were eliminated by host nation France in the quarter-finals, 5–2.[29]

World Cup team 2018.

2018 World Cup[edit]

Iceland qualified for the 2018 World Cup, their first ever appearance in the world championship, securing qualification on 9 October 2017 after a 2–0 win against Kosovo. In doing so, they became the lowest-populated country ever to reach the finals.[30] Iceland were drawn to play Croatia, Argentina and Nigeria in a group that was considered by many as the "group of death".[31][32] Despite a challenging group, Iceland were tipped to advance from the group by several journalist websites, based on their impressive performance in Euro 2016.[33] Their maiden match at the World Cup was against 2014 runners-up Argentina, with Iceland surprisingly holding Argentina to a 1–1 draw.[34][35] However, their chances of advancing from the group were hurt following a 2–0 loss to Nigeria, with several missed opportunities in the first half and a penalty kick in the second half missed by Gylfi Sigurdsson, putting Iceland to play with full determination against already qualified Croatia.[36][37] Iceland lost to Croatia in their final group game; and because Argentina won against Nigeria, Iceland finished bottom of the group with just a point.[38][39]

2018–19 UEFA Nations League[edit]

After Euro 2016 and the 2018 World Cup, Iceland was expected to play at Euro 2020. However, the team is playing just before the brand new Nations League, where they are in Group 2 of League A with Switzerland and Belgium. But the Strákarnir okkar are showing worrying signals: the post-World Cup period is difficult as Iceland concedes 4 defeats in 4 games, including a heavy initial setback in Switzerland (0–6) where they were dominated in all compartments of the game by the Helvetians. Many of Iceland's international matches were undermined by the repeated absence of some of their key players, often due to injury; while the Icelandic defense, often unbeatable in previous crucial matches, is showing more and more difficulty in replacing its usual key players with a new generation of younger defenders. Due to the change of rules finally decided by UEFA, Iceland is not relegated to League B for the 2020–2021 edition.

Euro 2020[edit]

In group H of the Euro qualifiers with the world champions France, Turkey, Albania, Andorra and Moldova, Icelanders are reassuring on the accounting level and are not surprised by the most modest opponents (Moldova and Andorra). However, they have more difficulties away (like the 0–6 in Switzerland) and lost three games, including the two confrontations against Les Bleus (4–0 at the Stade de France and 1–0 at home on a penalty kick after the hour of play at the end of a tight game) and a scathing defeat away against Albania 4–2, However, they continue to outplay Turks by taking 4 points out of 6 possible and being the only undefeated team as well as the only team of the group to inflict a defeat against this team. Third behind Turkey and France, the Icelanders won 2–1 in the first playoff game against Romania thanks to a brace of Gylfi Sigurðsson in the first half (16th and 34th minute), despite the Romanian reduction of the score on penalty kick in the second half after consultation of the VAR and will have to negotiate a perilous trip to Hungary, which won at the Bulgarians (3–1) and made a good impression at home in group E of the Euro 2020 qualifiers by beating Croatia (2–1) and Wales (1–0). On November 12, 2020 in their playoff game against Hungary, Iceland came agonisingly close to qualifying for Euro 2020, as it led 1–0 for nearly the entire match, on a direct free kick by Gylfi Sigurðsson well helped by a blunder of the opponent's goalkeeper Péter Gulácsi (11th minute), until Hungary scored two goals in under five minutes, the first coming in the 88th minute by Loïc Nego to stun Iceland and the second in the second minute of added time by Dominik Szoboszlai, proving to be the winner; Hungary had beaten Iceland 2–1.[40]

Iceland had also suffered poor results in their UEFA Nations League campaign in League A, having lost all their group stage matches and failing to garner a single point, resulting in their relegation to League B the following season.[41] Manager Erik Hamrén ultimately resigned, following their poor performance that year.[42]

2022 World Cup[edit]

The start of the 2022 World Cup qualifiers was also totally missed by Iceland, which suffered two defeats at the beginning of the tournament, away against Germany (0–3) and more surprisingly in Armenia (0–2). However, the Strákarnir okkar are back in the race thanks to a 4–1 victory over Liechtenstein combined with concomitant defeats of Romania and Germany. The crucial preparation for the September games, where Iceland had the advantage of playing all three games at home after several away games and had played some encouraging friendlies in June, was disrupted by extra-sporting affairs involving major players accused of sexual offences[43][44] and thus absent from the month's games. The cases also led to the resignation of several senior officials of the Icelandic Football Association, including its president.[45] Against this backdrop, Romania took revenge for the Euro play-off they had lost almost a year earlier, beating Strákarnir okkar 2–0. The latter are then forced to draw (2–2 after being led 0–2) against North Macedonia before falling heavily against Germany (0–4) and pointing to the penultimate place in the group with 4 units on the counter with 4 days to go in the qualifiers, significantly reducing Iceland's chances of qualifying for the next World Cup. Then Iceland recovered in the two October games by holding Armenia (1–1) who had beaten them 2–0 in March and then by winning widely against Liechtenstein (4–0). Despite this, Iceland is still 5th in its group and is about to be eliminated. Against all odds, they resisted away against Romania despite a clear domination of the local team (0–0) but were mathematically eliminated with one day to go since the Strákarnir okkar had to win their last two games and hope for slip-ups from their direct competitors to finish 2nd in the group.

These distressing results are due to several factors, both sporting and extra-sporting: the late generational renewal of the usual ageing management team, a process partly hampered by a limited pool of footballers due to Iceland's demographics; the questionable tactical choices of the new, inexperienced coach, resulting in a lack of automatism among new players who are not used to playing together and the absence of a real standard team; and sexual assault scandals that have effectively sidelined some of the team's best players under investigation and have continued the negative spiral.[46][47]

Team image[edit]

The national team uses a blue as the home colours and white as their second colours but their crest featuring stylized imagery of Iceland's four "guardian spirits" (Landvættir) in local folklore; a giant, a dragon, a bull, and an eagle. The team's crest was adopted in 2020 and was designed by Reykjavík-based firm Bradenburg. Previously the team used a team crest which features a shield-type symbol which consist the abbreviation of the Football Association of Iceland in Icelandic (KSI), strips which derives colors from the Flag of Iceland, and a football.[48][49]

Iceland's supporters became known for using Viking Clap chant in the mid-2010s, which involves fans clapping their hands above their heads and yelling "huh!" to the beat of a drum. Iceland's Viking Clap first received wider international attention during the Euro 2016.[50]

Kit providers[edit]

The official kit is produced by German sports manufacturing company Puma since 2020. Before that the kit providers were Umbro (1975), Adidas (1976–1992), ABM (1992–1996), Reusch (1996–2001) and Erreà (2002–2020)

Kit provider Period
England Umbro 1975
Germany Adidas 1976–1991
Italy ABM 1992–1996
Germany Reusch 1996–2001
Italy Erreà 2002–2020
Germany Puma 2020–

Results and fixtures[edit]

  Win   Draw   Loss

2022[edit]

12 January 2022 Friendly Iceland  1–1  Uganda Antalya, Turkey
17:00 UTC+3 Böðvarsson 5' Report Kaddu 31' (pen.) Stadium: Titanic Deluxe Belek Football Center
26 March 2022 Friendly Finland  1–1  Iceland Murcia, Spain
17:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Estadio Nueva Condomina
Referee: Fedayi San (Switzerland)
29 March 2022 Friendly Spain  5–0  Iceland A Coruña, Spain
20:45 UTC+2
Report Stadium: Estadio Riazor
Referee: Horațiu Feșnic (Romania)
2 June 2022 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Israel  2–2  Iceland Haifa, Israel
18:45 (21:45 UTC+3)
Report Stadium: Sammy Ofer Stadium
Attendance: 13,150
Referee: Andris Treimanis (Latvia)
6 June 2022 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Iceland  1–1  Albania Reykjavík, Iceland
20:45 (18:45; UTC±0) Þorsteinsson 49' Report Seferi 30' Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur
Attendance: 4,033
Referee: Craig Pawson (England)
9 June 2022 Friendly San Marino  0–1  Iceland Serravalle, San Marino
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Stadio Olimpico di Serravalle
Referee: Michael Fabbri (Italy)
13 June 2022 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Iceland  2–2  Israel Reykjavík, Iceland
18:45 (21:45 UTC+3) Report
Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur
Attendance: 2,778
Referee: Duje Strukan (Croatia)
22 September 2022 Friendly Venezuela  0–1  Iceland Mödling, Austria
18:00 UTC+2 Stadium: Motion invest Arena
Referee: Sebastian Gishamer (Austria)
27 September 2022 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Albania  1–1  Iceland Tirana, Albania
20:45 UTC+2 Ermir Lenjani 35' Report Mikael Anderson 90+7' Stadium: Arena Kombëtare
Attendance: 8,800
Referee: Ricardo de Burgos (Spain)
6 November 2022 Friendly Saudi Arabia  1–0  Iceland Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
16:00 UTC+4 Abdulhamid 26' Report Stadium: Mohammed bin Zayed Stadium
Referee: Ahmed Eisa Darwich (United Arab Emirates)
11 November 2022 Friendly South Korea  1–0  Iceland Hwaseong, South Korea
20:00 UTC+9 Report Stadium: Hwaseong Stadium
Attendance: 15,274
Referee: Jumpei Iida (Japan)

2023[edit]

8 January 2023 Friendly Iceland  v  Estonia Albufeira, Portugal
Stadium: Estadio da Nora
19 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Portugal  v  Iceland TBD, Portugal
20:45 (19:45 UTC±0) Report Stadium: TBD

[52][53][54][55]

Coaching staff[edit]

Position Name
Head coach Iceland Arnar Viðarsson
Assistant coach Iceland Jóhannes Karl Guðjónsson
Technical advisor Iceland Bjarni Jakobsson
Training coach Iceland Birkir Eyjólfsson
Fitness coach Iceland Ari Þór Örlygsson
First-Team Doctor Iceland Jóhannes Rúnarsson
Goalkeeper coach Iceland Halldór Björnsson
Physiotherapist Iceland Sverrir Sigþórsson

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The following players were called up for the friendly matches in the Baltic Cup against Lithuania and Latvia on 16 November 2022 and 19 November 2022 respectively.[56]

Caps and goals are correct as of 19 November 2022, after the match against Latvia.[57][58]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Rúnar Alex Rúnarsson (1995-02-18) 18 February 1995 (age 27) 20 0 Turkey Alanyaspor
1GK Elías Rafn Ólafsson (2000-03-11) 11 March 2000 (age 22) 4 0 Denmark Midtjylland
1GK Patrik Gunnarsson (2000-11-15) 15 November 2000 (age 22) 2 0 Norway Viking

2DF Aron Gunnarsson (Captain) (1989-04-22) 22 April 1989 (age 33) 100 2 Qatar Al-Arabi
2DF Hörður Björgvin Magnússon (1993-02-11) 11 February 1993 (age 29) 44 2 Greece Panathinaikos
2DF Sverrir Ingi Ingason (1993-08-05) 5 August 1993 (age 29) 40 3 Greece PAOK
2DF Alfons Sampsted (1998-04-06) 6 April 1998 (age 24) 14 0 Norway Bodø/Glimt
2DF Daníel Leó Grétarsson (1995-10-02) 2 October 1995 (age 27) 12 0 Poland Śląsk Wrocław
2DF Davíð Kristján Ólafsson (1995-05-15) 15 May 1995 (age 27) 11 0 Sweden Kalmar
2DF Valgeir Lunddal Friðriksson (2001-09-24) 24 September 2001 (age 21) 4 0 Sweden Häcken

3MF Birkir Bjarnason (vice-captain) (1988-05-27) 27 May 1988 (age 34) 113 15 Turkey Adana Demirspor
3MF Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson (1990-10-27) 27 October 1990 (age 32) 82 8 England Burnley
3MF Arnór Sigurðsson (1999-05-15) 15 May 1999 (age 23) 25 2 Sweden Norrköping
3MF Jón Dagur Þorsteinsson (1998-11-26) 26 November 1998 (age 24) 24 4 Belgium OH Leuven
3MF Mikael Anderson (1998-07-01) 1 July 1998 (age 24) 18 2 Denmark AGF
3MF Aron Elís Þrándarson (1994-11-10) 10 November 1994 (age 28) 17 1 Denmark OB
3MF Ísak Bergmann Jóhannesson (2003-03-23) 23 March 2003 (age 19) 17 3 Denmark Copenhagen
3MF Þórir Jóhann Helgason (2000-09-28) 28 September 2000 (age 22) 16 2 Italy Lecce
3MF Stefán Teitur Þórðarson (1998-10-16) 16 October 1998 (age 24) 15 1 Denmark Silkeborg
3MF Mikael Egill Ellertsson (2002-03-11) 11 March 2002 (age 20) 10 0 Italy Spezia
3MF Hákon Arnar Haraldsson (2003-04-10) 10 April 2003 (age 19) 7 0 Denmark Copenhagen

4FW Sveinn Aron Guðjohnsen (1998-05-12) 12 May 1998 (age 24) 17 1 Sweden Elfsborg
4FW Andri Guðjohnsen (2002-01-29) 29 January 2002 (age 20) 12 2 Sweden Norrköping

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have been called up to the Iceland squad in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Frederik Schram (1995-01-19) 19 January 1995 (age 27) 6 0 Iceland Valur v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
GK Hákon Rafn Valdimarsson (2001-10-13) 13 October 2001 (age 21) 3 0 Sweden Elfsborg v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
GK Sindri Kristinn Ólafsson (1997-01-19) 19 January 1997 (age 25) 0 0 Iceland FH v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
GK Ingvar Jónsson (1989-10-18) 18 October 1989 (age 33) 8 0 Iceland Víkingur Reykjavík v.  San Marino, 9 June 2022 INJ
GK Jökull Andrésson (2001-08-25) 25 August 2001 (age 21) 1 0 England Reading v.  South Korea, 15 January 2022

DF Höskuldur Gunnlaugsson (1994-09-26) 26 September 1994 (age 28) 7 0 Iceland Breiðablik v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
DF Damir Muminovic (1990-05-13) 13 May 1990 (age 32) 4 0 Iceland Breiðablik v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
DF Hörður Ingi Gunnarsson (1998-08-14) 14 August 1998 (age 24) 2 0 Norway Sogndal v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
DF Logi Tómasson (2000-09-13) 13 September 2000 (age 22) 2 0 Iceland Víkingur Reykjavík v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
DF Róbert Orri Þorkelsson (2002-04-03) 3 April 2002 (age 20) 2 0 Canada Montréal v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
DF Rúnar Þór Sigurgeirsson (1999-12-28) 28 December 1999 (age 22) 2 0 Sweden Öster v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
DF Viktor Örn Margeirsson (1994-07-22) 22 July 1994 (age 28) 1 0 Iceland Breiðablik v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
DF Victor Pálsson (1991-04-30) 30 April 1991 (age 31) 31 1 United States D.C. United v.  Saudi Arabia, 6 November 2022
DF Hjörtur Hermannsson (1995-02-08) 8 February 1995 (age 27) 25 1 Italy Pisa v.  Albania, 27 September 2022
DF Brynjar Ingi Bjarnason (1999-12-06) 6 December 1999 (age 22) 14 2 Norway Vålerenga v.  Israel, 13 June 2022
DF Atli Barkarson (2001-03-19) 19 March 2001 (age 21) 4 0 Denmark SønderjyskE v.  Israel, 13 June 2022
DF Ari Leifsson (1998-04-19) 19 April 1998 (age 24) 4 0 Norway Strømsgodset v.  Israel, 13 June 2022
DF Guðmundur Þórarinsson (1992-04-15) 15 April 1992 (age 30) 12 0 Greece OFI Crete v.  Finland, 26 March 2022 INJ
DF Ísak Ólafsson (2000-06-30) 30 June 2000 (age 22) 2 0 Denmark Esbjerg v.  South Korea, 15 January 2022
DF Finnur Tómas Pálmason (2001-02-12) 12 February 2001 (age 21) 1 0 Iceland KR v.  South Korea, 15 January 2022

MF Viktor Karl Einarsson (1997-01-30) 30 January 1997 (age 25) 4 0 Iceland Breiðablik v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Júlíus Magnússon (1998-06-28) 28 June 1998 (age 24) 3 0 Iceland Víkingur Reykjavík v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Viktor Örlygur Andrason (2000-02-05) 5 February 2000 (age 22) 3 0 Iceland Víkingur Reykjavík v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Bjarki Steinn Bjarkason (2000-05-11) 11 May 2000 (age 22) 2 0 Italy Venezia v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Dagur Dan Þórhallsson (2000-05-02) 2 May 2000 (age 22) 2 0 Iceland Breiðablik v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Jónatan Ingi Jónsson (1999-03-15) 15 March 1999 (age 23) 2 0 Norway Sogndal v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Valdimar Þór Ingimundarson (1999-04-28) 28 April 1999 (age 23) 2 0 Norway Sogndal v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Daníel Hafsteinsson (1999-11-12) 12 November 1999 (age 23) 1 0 Iceland KA v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
MF Albert Guðmundsson (1997-06-15) 15 June 1997 (age 25) 33 6 Italy Genoa v.  Israel, 13 June 2022
MF Willum Þór Willumsson (1998-10-23) 23 October 1998 (age 24) 1 0 Netherlands Go Ahead Eagles v.  Israel, 2 June 2022 INJ
MF Arnór Ingvi Traustason (1993-04-30) 30 April 1993 (age 29) 44 5 Sweden Norrköping v.  Spain, 29 March 2022
MF Andri Baldursson (2002-01-10) 10 January 2002 (age 20) 9 0 Netherlands NEC v.  Spain, 29 March 2022
MF Viðar Ari Jónsson (1994-03-10) 10 March 1994 (age 28) 7 0 Hungary Honvéd v.  South Korea, 15 January 2022
MF Alex Þór Hauksson (1999-11-26) 26 November 1999 (age 23) 4 0 Sweden Öster v.  South Korea, 15 January 2022
MF Gísli Eyjólfsson (1994-05-31) 31 May 1994 (age 28) 4 0 Iceland Breiðablik v.  South Korea, 15 January 2022
MF Kristall Máni Ingason (2002-01-18) 18 January 2002 (age 20) 2 0 Norway Rosenborg v.  South Korea, 15 January 2022

FW Óttar Magnús Karlsson (1997-02-21) 21 February 1997 (age 25) 11 2 United States Oakland Roots v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
FW Jason Daði Svanþórsson (1999-12-31) 31 December 1999 (age 22) 3 0 Iceland Breiðablik v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
FW Ísak Þorvaldsson (2001-05-01) 1 May 2001 (age 21) 2 0 Norway Rosenborg v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
FW Danijel Djuric (2003-01-05) 5 January 2003 (age 19) 1 0 Iceland Víkingur Reykjavík v.  South Korea, 11 November 2022
FW Alfreð Finnbogason (1989-02-01) 1 February 1989 (age 33) 63 15 Denmark Lyngby v.  Albania, 27 September 2022
FW Hólmbert Friðjónsson (1993-04-19) 19 April 1993 (age 29) 6 2 Norway Lillestrøm v.  Israel, 2 June 2022 WD
FW Jón Daði Böðvarsson (1992-05-25) 25 May 1992 (age 30) 64 4 England Bolton Wanderers v.  Spain, 29 March 2022
FW Brynjólfur Willumsson (2000-08-12) 12 August 2000 (age 22) 0 0 Norway Kristiansund v.  Uganda, 12 January 2022 INJ

INJ Withdrew due to injury
RET Retired from the national team
WD Player withdrew from the squad due to non-injury issue.

.

Previous squads[edit]

Records[edit]

As of 19 November 2022.[59][60]
Players in bold are still active with Iceland.

Most caps[edit]

Birkir Bjarnason is Iceland's all-time most capped with 113 caps.
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Birkir Bjarnason 113 15 2010–present
2 Rúnar Kristinsson 104 3 1987–2004
3 Birkir Már Sævarsson 103 3 2007–2021
4 Aron Einar Gunnarsson 100 2 2008–present
5 Ragnar Sigurðsson 97 5 2007–2020
6 Kári Árnason 90 6 2005–2021
7 Hermann Hreiðarsson 89 5 1996–2011
8 Eiður Guðjohnsen 88 26 1996–2016
9 Ari Freyr Skúlason 83 0 2009–2021
10 Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson 82 8 2008–present

Top goalscorers[edit]

Kolbeinn Sigþórsson (left) and Eiður Guðjohnsen jointly hold the record for top goalscorers in the history of Iceland with 26 goals.
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Kolbeinn Sigþórsson 26 64 0.41 2010–present
Eiður Guðjohnsen 26 88 0.3 1996–2016
3 Gylfi Sigurðsson 25 78 0.32 2010–present
4 Ríkharður Jónsson 17 33 0.52 1947–1965
5 Alfreð Finnbogason 15 63 0.24 2010–present
Birkir Bjarnason 15 113 0.13 2010–present
7 Ríkharður Daðason 14 44 0.32 1991–2004
Arnór Guðjohnsen 14 73 0.19 1979–1997
9 Þórður Guðjónsson 13 58 0.22 1993–2004
10 Tryggvi Guðmundsson 12 42 0.29 1997–2008
Heiðar Helguson 12 55 0.22 1999–2011

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA World Cup[edit]

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member
Italy 1934
France 1938
Brazil 1950
Switzerland 1954 Did not enter Did not enter
Sweden 1958 Did not qualify 4 0 0 4 6 26
Chile 1962 Did not enter Did not enter
England 1966
Mexico 1970
West Germany 1974 Did not qualify 6 0 0 6 2 29
Argentina 1978 6 1 0 5 2 12
Spain 1982 8 2 2 4 10 21
Mexico 1986 6 1 0 5 4 10
Italy 1990 8 1 4 3 6 11
United States 1994 8 3 2 3 7 6
France 1998 10 2 3 5 11 16
South Korea Japan 2002 10 4 1 5 14 20
Germany 2006 10 1 1 8 14 27
South Africa 2010 8 1 2 5 7 13
Brazil 2014 12 5 3 4 17 17
Russia 2018 Group stage 28th 3 0 1 2 2 5 Squad 10 7 1 2 16 7
Qatar 2022 Did not qualify 10 2 3 5 12 18
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined To be determined
Total Group stage 1/22 3 0 1 2 2 5 116 30 22 64 128 233

UEFA European Championship[edit]

UEFA European Championship record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
France 1960 Did not enter Did not enter
Spain 1964 Did not qualify 2 0 1 1 3 5
Italy 1968 Did not enter Did not enter
Belgium 1972
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 Did not qualify 6 1 2 3 3 8
Italy 1980 8 0 0 8 2 21
France 1984 8 1 1 6 3 13
West Germany 1988 8 2 2 4 4 14
Sweden 1992 8 2 0 6 7 10
England 1996 8 1 2 5 3 12
Belgium Netherlands 2000 10 4 3 3 12 7
Portugal 2004 8 4 1 3 11 9
Austria Switzerland 2008 12 2 2 8 10 27
Poland Ukraine 2012 8 1 1 6 6 14
France 2016 Quarter-finals 8th 5 2 2 1 8 9 10 6 2 2 17 6
Europe 2020 Did not qualify 12 7 1 4 17 14
Germany 2024 To be determined To be determined
Total Quarter-finals 1/16 5 2 2 1 8 9 108 31 18 59 98 160

UEFA Nations League[edit]

UEFA Nations League record
Year Division Group Pld W D L GF GA P/R Rank
2018–19 A 2 4 0 0 4 1 13 Same position 12th
2020–21 A 2 6 0 0 6 3 17 Fall 16th
2022–23 B 2 4 0 4 0 6 6 Same position 23rd
2024–25 B To be determined
Total 14 0 4 10 10 36 12th

Honours[edit]

FIFA ranking history[edit]

Source:[61]

1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
46 47 39 50 60 72 64 43 50 52 58 58 93 94 93 90 83 92 112 104 90 49 33 36 21 22 37 39 46 62

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

  1. ^ a b On 2 May 2022, UEFA announced that Russia were suspended and automatically relegated to League C due to their country's invasion of Ukraine.[51]