Logan County, Arkansas

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Logan County
Logan County Courthouse, Paris
Logan County Courthouse, Paris
Map of Arkansas highlighting Logan County
Location within the U.S. state of Arkansas
Map of the United States highlighting Arkansas
Arkansas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°13′29″N 93°44′26″W / 35.224722222222°N 93.740555555556°W / 35.224722222222; -93.740555555556
Country United States
State Arkansas
FoundedMarch 22, 1871
Named forJames Logan
SeatParis (northern district);
Booneville (southern district)
Largest cityBooneville
Area
 • Total732 sq mi (1,900 km2)
 • Land708 sq mi (1,830 km2)
 • Water23 sq mi (60 km2)  3.2%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total22,353
 • Estimate 
(2019)
21,466
 • Density31/sq mi (12/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district4th

Logan County (formerly Sarber County) is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,353.[1] Its two county seats are Booneville and Paris.[2]

History[edit]

The Arkansas General Assembly defined the state's 64th county on March 22, 1871, incorporating part of Scott County. They named it Sarber County for John Newton Sarber (1837–1905), an attorney and Republican state senator from Yell County. He had introduced the resolution to organize the county. Born and reared in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he had moved with his widowed father and family to Kansas in 1855. Sarber became influential in the Arkansas legislature, introducing bills to establish a public school system for the first time, and what developed as the University of Arkansas. He was appointed as U.S. marshal of the U.S. Western District Court at Fort Smith.[citation needed]

Conservative white Democrats viewed Sarber as a carpetbagger because he was a Union Army veteran who had decided to settle in Arkansas. There he had married Susan Rebecca Rose in 1867. She was the daughter of Moreau Rose, an early pioneer and a Confederate supporter, and his wife. The Sarber couple had six children together; five survived to adulthood.

After white Democrats regained control of the state legislature in 1875, they renamed Sarber County for James Logan (1792-1859), a Kentucky-born early settler in the area who had served in the territorial legislature, from Crawford County, and the first state legislature, from Scott County (part of the latter was absorbed into Logan County).[3]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 732 square miles (1,900 km2), of which 708 square miles (1,830 km2) are land and 23 square miles (60 km2) (3.2%) are water.[4] The highest natural point in Arkansas, Magazine Mountain at 2,753 feet (839 m), is located in Logan County.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
188014,885
189020,77439.6%
190020,563−1.0%
191026,35028.1%
192025,866−1.8%
193024,110−6.8%
194025,9677.7%
195020,260−22.0%
196015,957−21.2%
197016,7895.2%
198020,14420.0%
199020,5572.1%
200022,4869.4%
201022,353−0.6%
2019 (est.)21,466[5]−4.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2016[1]
Age pyramid Logan County[10]

2020 census[edit]

Logan County racial composition[11]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 18,586 87.96%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 225 1.06%
Native American 228 1.08%
Asian 328 1.55%
Pacific Islander 8 0.04%
Other/Mixed 1,116 5.28%
Hispanic or Latino 640 3.03%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 21,131 people, 8,417 households, and 5,839 families residing in the county.

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 census,[12] there were 22,486 people, 8,693 households, and 6,302 families residing in the county. The population density was 32 people per square mile (12/km2). There were 9,942 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.46% White, 1.05% Black or African American, 0.65% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. 1.21% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 8,693 households, out of which 32.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.70% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.50% were non-families. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.90% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 26.70% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 16.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 98.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,344, and the median income for a family was $33,732. Males had a median income of $24,472 versus $18,681 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,527. About 11.40% of families and 15.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.20% of those under age 18 and 19.60% of those age 65 or over.


Politics[edit]

Over the past few election cycles, Logan County has trended heavily towards the GOP. The last Democrat (as of 2020) to carry this county was Bill Clinton in 1996.

United States presidential election results for Logan County, Arkansas[13]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 6,441 78.31% 1,544 18.77% 240 2.92%
2016 5,746 72.54% 1,715 21.65% 460 5.81%
2012 5,079 69.28% 2,009 27.40% 243 3.31%
2008 5,350 67.66% 2,286 28.91% 271 3.43%
2004 5,076 59.36% 3,361 39.31% 114 1.33%
2000 4,487 55.42% 3,283 40.55% 326 4.03%
1996 2,966 37.07% 3,832 47.89% 1,204 15.05%
1992 3,408 39.23% 3,995 45.99% 1,284 14.78%
1988 2,203 62.87% 1,254 35.79% 47 1.34%
1984 5,663 63.14% 3,206 35.75% 100 1.11%
1980 4,511 50.61% 4,098 45.98% 304 3.41%
1976 2,909 35.07% 5,313 64.06% 72 0.87%
1972 4,964 71.42% 1,956 28.14% 30 0.43%
1968 2,341 36.02% 1,998 30.74% 2,160 33.24%
1964 2,265 38.42% 3,604 61.13% 27 0.46%
1960 2,014 42.28% 2,636 55.33% 114 2.39%
1956 2,081 47.17% 2,307 52.29% 24 0.54%
1952 2,103 44.85% 2,567 54.75% 19 0.41%
1948 902 28.26% 2,130 66.73% 160 5.01%
1944 1,279 35.98% 2,269 63.83% 7 0.20%
1940 1,065 27.34% 2,831 72.66% 0 0.00%
1936 770 22.38% 2,663 77.41% 7 0.20%
1932 645 20.32% 2,493 78.54% 36 1.13%
1928 1,455 42.42% 1,967 57.35% 8 0.23%
1924 937 32.06% 1,457 49.85% 529 18.10%
1920 1,871 49.51% 1,840 48.69% 68 1.80%
1916 1,183 36.96% 2,018 63.04% 0 0.00%
1912 333 12.98% 1,319 51.40% 914 35.62%
1908 1,151 38.65% 1,716 57.62% 111 3.73%
1904 1,007 43.92% 1,237 53.95% 49 2.14%
1900 848 34.88% 1,557 64.05% 26 1.07%
1896 946 34.51% 1,786 65.16% 9 0.33%


Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Townships in Arkansas are the divisions of a county. Each township includes unincorporated areas; some may have incorporated cities or towns within part of their boundaries. Arkansas townships have limited purposes in modern times. However, the United States census does list Arkansas population based on townships (sometimes referred to as "county subdivisions" or "minor civil divisions"). Townships are also of value for historical purposes in terms of genealogical research. Each town or city is within one or more townships in an Arkansas county based on census maps and publications. The townships of Logan County are listed below; listed in parentheses are the cities, towns, and/or census-designated places that are fully or partially inside the township. [14][15]

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved May 23, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Acts, Resolutions and Memorials of the General Assembly of the State of Arkansas (Session from November 1 to December 15, 1875 ed.). Little Rock, AR: P.A. Ladue. 1876. pp. 129–131. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 27, 2015.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 27, 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 27, 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 27, 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 27, 2015.
  10. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  11. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  13. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved November 18, 2016.
  14. ^ 2011 Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS): Logan County, AR (PDF) (Map). U. S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2012. Retrieved August 24, 2011.
  15. ^ "Arkansas: 2010 Census Block Maps - County Subdivision". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 29, 2014.
  16. ^ a b Reichler, Joseph L., ed. (1979) [1969]. The Baseball Encyclopedia (4th ed.). New York: Macmillan Publishing. ISBN 0-02-578970-8.

Further reading[edit]

  • DeBlack, Thomas A. With Fire and Sword: Arkansas, 1861–1874. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2003.
  • Hodges, Mary Frances. John Newton Sarber and Sarber County, Arkansas. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse, 2009. (self-published)
  • Moneyhon, Carl H. The Impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on Arkansas. Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 1994.

Coordinates: 35°13′29″N 93°44′26″W / 35.22472°N 93.74056°W / 35.22472; -93.74056