Taylor County, Texas

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Taylor County
New Taylor County Courthouse in Abilene
New Taylor County Courthouse in Abilene
Map of Texas highlighting Taylor County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°19′N 99°53′W / 32.31°N 99.88°W / 32.31; -99.88
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1878
Named forEdward, George, and James Taylor
SeatAbilene
Largest cityAbilene
Area
 • Total919.3 sq mi (2,381 km2)
 • Land915.6 sq mi (2,371 km2)
 • Water3.8 sq mi (10 km2)  0.4%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total143,208
 • Density160/sq mi (60/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district19th
Websitewww.taylorcountytexas.org


The Old Taylor County Courthouse has limited use.

Taylor County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, its population was 143,208.[1][2] Its county seat is Abilene.[3] The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1878.[4] It is named for Edward Taylor, George Taylor, and James Taylor, three brothers who died at the Battle of the Alamo.

Taylor County is included in the Abilene, TX metropolitan statistical area, and is considered part of West Texas.

History[edit]

Among first inhabitants of the area were the Penteka.[5] In 1849, Capt. Randolph Marcy, a U. S. Army engineer, passed through, scouting out West Texas-to-California routes.[6] The Texas legislature established Taylor County in 1858 from Bexar and Travis Counties. The county is named for Alamo defenders Edward, James, and George Taylor. The Butterfield Overland Mail established the Mountain Pass Station at Merkel; it was in continual use until 1861.[5]

By 1872, the first cattlemen had ventured into present Taylor County.[5] Six years later, Taylor County was organized. Buffalo Gap was named county seat.[5][7] In 1880, the Texas & Pacific Railroad signed an agreement to run tracks through the future city of Abilene.[6] Abilene was established in 1882, and named after Abilene, Kansas.[8] Abilene became the county seat in 1883.[8] A wagon train of 10 Baptist families arrived in the county that year.[5]

The Abilene Board of Trade was organized in 1890, when 587 farms and ranches were in the county.[5] The next year, Hardin-Simmons University was established as Abilene Baptist College by the Sweetwater Baptist Association.[9] Lytle Lake ws created in 1897.[5]

The State Epileptic Colony opened in Abilene in 1904.[10] In 1906, Abilene Christian University opened its doors as Childers Classical Institute.[11] In the 1920s, Hendricks Medical Center opened in Abilene as West Texas Baptist Sanitarium (1924) and the West Texas Historical Association was chartered in Abilene.[5] The first senior class of McMurry University graduated (1926).[12] Oil was discovered in the county a few years later (1929).[13]

In 1933, Abilene donated land for use by the Civilian Conservation Corps.[14]

Dyess Air Force Base was established as Abilene AFB in 1942; it is named in honor of Texas native and Bataan Death March survivor Lieutenant Colonel William Dyess.[15] The Abilene Philharmonic Orchestra was created, with Jay Dietzer as the first conductor, in 1950.[5] The Buffalo Gap Historic Village opened in 1956.[16]


Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 919 sq mi (2,380 km2), of which 916 sq mi (2,370 km2) are land and 3.8 sq mi (9.8 km2) (0.4%) are covered by water.[17]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18801,736
18906,957300.7%
190010,49950.9%
191026,293150.4%
192024,081−8.4%
193041,02370.4%
194044,1477.6%
195063,37043.5%
1960101,07859.5%
197097,853−3.2%
1980110,93213.4%
1990119,6557.9%
2000126,5555.8%
2010131,5063.9%
2020143,2088.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]
1850–2010[19] 2010[20] 2020[21]

2020 census[edit]

Taylor County, Texas - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[20] Pop 2020[21] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 88,121 87,316 67.01% 60.97%
Black or African American alone (NH) 9,122 10,980 6.94% 7.67%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 532 589 0.40% 0.41%
Asian alone (NH) 1,978 2,815 1.50% 1.97%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 105 161 0.08% 0.11%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 133 468 0.10% 0.33%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 2,441 6,123 1.86% 4.28%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 29,074 34,756 22.11% 24.27%
Total 131,506 143,208 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census[edit]

As of the census[22] of 2000, 126,555 people, 47,274 households, and 32,524 families resided in the county. The population density was 138 people per square mile (53/km2). The 52,056 housing units averaged 57 per mi2 (22/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 80.61% White, 6.73% Black or African American, 0.58% Native American, 1.25% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 8.35% from other races, and 2.42% from two or more races. About 17.64% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 47,274 households, 34.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.80% were married couples living together, 11.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.20% were not families. About 25.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the county, the age distribution was as 26.60% under 18, 13.80% from 18 to 24, 27.80% from 25 to 44, 19.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.40% who were 65 or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,035, and for a family was $40,859. Males had a median income of $28,964 versus $21,021 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,176. About 10.40% of families and 14.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.60% of those under age 18 and 9.20% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Military base[edit]

Politics[edit]

United States presidential election results for Taylor County, Texas[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 39,547 71.73% 14,588 26.46% 1,000 1.81%
2016 33,250 72.66% 10,085 22.04% 2,424 5.30%
2012 32,904 76.06% 9,750 22.54% 609 1.41%
2008 34,317 72.34% 12,690 26.75% 432 0.91%
2004 37,197 77.33% 10,648 22.14% 254 0.53%
2000 31,701 73.69% 10,504 24.42% 815 1.89%
1996 23,682 59.17% 13,213 33.02% 3,126 7.81%
1992 22,614 49.75% 12,382 27.24% 10,458 23.01%
1988 28,563 67.97% 13,073 31.11% 388 0.92%
1984 34,444 77.92% 9,628 21.78% 130 0.29%
1980 22,961 62.00% 13,245 35.77% 826 2.23%
1976 19,822 57.38% 14,453 41.84% 268 0.78%
1972 22,417 78.02% 6,024 20.97% 290 1.01%
1968 12,218 47.68% 9,107 35.54% 4,301 16.78%
1964 9,220 40.76% 13,366 59.09% 34 0.15%
1960 12,258 56.62% 9,347 43.17% 45 0.21%
1956 9,488 56.82% 7,177 42.98% 34 0.20%
1952 10,260 56.22% 7,936 43.48% 55 0.30%
1948 1,658 15.98% 8,184 78.90% 531 5.12%
1944 602 6.18% 7,975 81.86% 1,165 11.96%
1940 983 11.11% 7,852 88.72% 15 0.17%
1936 678 9.83% 6,169 89.43% 51 0.74%
1932 639 10.86% 5,235 88.95% 11 0.19%
1928 4,050 68.07% 1,891 31.78% 9 0.15%
1924 441 12.05% 3,157 86.26% 62 1.69%
1920 300 12.31% 1,932 79.25% 206 8.45%
1916 120 5.05% 2,134 89.89% 120 5.05%
1912 59 3.14% 1,536 81.79% 283 15.07%


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  2. ^ "Taylor County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 27, 2015.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Leffler, John (June 15, 2010). "Taylor County, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved November 29, 2010.
  6. ^ a b Hundell, Ken and Sharon (2005). Spirits of the Border V: The History and Mystery of the Lone Star State. Omega Press. pp. 118–119. ISBN 978-0-9626087-9-7.
  7. ^ "Buffalo Gap, Texas". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved November 29, 2010.
  8. ^ a b "Abilene, Texas". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved November 29, 2010.
  9. ^ Early Jr, Joseph E; McBeth, Harry Leon (2004). A Texas Baptist History Sourcebook: A Companion to McBeth's Texas Baptists. University of North Texas Press. p. 139. ISBN 978-1-57441-176-8.
  10. ^ "Epileptic Colony Open". The Journal of the American Medical Association. 41: 973. 1903.
  11. ^ Foster, Douglas A; Blowers, Paul M; Dunnavant, Anthony L; Williams, D Newell (2005). The Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-8028-3898-8.
  12. ^ Downs, Fane (June 15, 2010). "McMurry University". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved November 30, 2010.
  13. ^ Warner, C A; Thompson, Ernest O (2007). Texas Oil & Gas Since 1543. Copano Bay Press. p. 227. ISBN 978-0-9767799-5-7.
  14. ^ Ebeling, Walter (1990). Fruited Plain: The Story of American Agriculture. University of California Press. p. 249. ISBN 978-0-520-03751-9.
  15. ^ Leatherwood, Art (June 12, 2010). "Dyess Air Force Base". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved November 30, 2010.
  16. ^ Aston, B W; Taylor, Ira Donathon (1997). Along the Texas Forts Trail. University of North Texas Press. p. 49. ISBN 978-1-57441-035-8.
  17. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  18. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  19. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  20. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Taylor County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  21. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Taylor County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  22. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 31, 2018.

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Zachry, Juanita Daniel A History of Rural Taylor County Nortex Press, 1980. ISBN 089015239X.

Coordinates: 32°19′N 99°53′W / 32.31°N 99.88°W / 32.31; -99.88