1571

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This article is about the year 1571. For the number, see 1571 (number). For the BT calling features service, see 1-5-7-1.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 15th century16th century17th century
Decades: 1540s  1550s  1560s  – 1570s –  1580s  1590s  1600s
Years: 1568 1569 157015711572 1573 1574
1571 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1571
MDLXXI
Ab urbe condita 2324
Armenian calendar 1020
ԹՎ ՌԻ
Assyrian calendar 6321
Bengali calendar 978
Berber calendar 2521
English Regnal year 13 Eliz. 1 – 14 Eliz. 1
Buddhist calendar 2115
Burmese calendar 933
Byzantine calendar 7079–7080
Chinese calendar 庚午(Metal Horse)
4267 or 4207
    — to —
辛未年 (Metal Goat)
4268 or 4208
Coptic calendar 1287–1288
Discordian calendar 2737
Ethiopian calendar 1563–1564
Hebrew calendar 5331–5332
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1627–1628
 - Shaka Samvat 1493–1494
 - Kali Yuga 4672–4673
Holocene calendar 11571
Igbo calendar 571–572
Iranian calendar 949–950
Islamic calendar 978–979
Japanese calendar Genki 2
(元亀2年)
Julian calendar 1571
MDLXXI
Korean calendar 3904
Minguo calendar 341 before ROC
民前341年
Thai solar calendar 2113–2114

Year 1571 (MDLXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

January–June[edit]

July–December[edit]

Battle of Lepanto, 1571

Date unknown[edit]

  • Using mercury in the silver extraction process dramatically increases the output of the Potosí mine; thus begins the great silver flow that links the New and Old Worlds.[3]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hibbert, Christopher, ed. (1988). The Encyclopædia of Oxford. London: Macmillan. p. 198. ISBN 0-333-39917-X. 
  2. ^ "The Library of Parliament's research tool for finding information on legislation". Library of Parliament. 2010-01-28. Archived from the original on 2 February 2010. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  3. ^ "Epic World History: Potosí (Silver Mines of Colonial Peru)". epicworldhistory.blogspot.com. 2015. Retrieved 1 May 2015. In 1571, after numerous trials, the Spanish perfected the techniques for refining Potosí’s silver ore with Huancavelica's mercury, prompting Viceroy Francisco de Toledo to gush that the union of the two mines would create the world’s greatest marriage.