1654

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This article is about the year 1654.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 16th century17th century18th century
Decades: 1620s  1630s  1640s  – 1650s –  1660s  1670s  1680s
Years: 1651 1652 165316541655 1656 1657
1654 by topic:
Arts and Science
Architecture - Art - Literature - Music - Science
Lists of leaders
Colonial governors - State leaders
Birth and death categories
Births - Deaths
Establishments and disestablishments categories
Establishments - Disestablishments
Works category
Works
1654 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1654
MDCLIV
Ab urbe condita 2407
Armenian calendar 1103
ԹՎ ՌՃԳ
Assyrian calendar 6404
Bahá'í calendar −190 – −189
Bengali calendar 1061
Berber calendar 2604
English Regnal year Cha. 2 – 6 Cha. 2
(Interregnum)
Buddhist calendar 2198
Burmese calendar 1016
Byzantine calendar 7162–7163
Chinese calendar 癸巳(Water Snake)
4350 or 4290
    — to —
甲午年 (Wood Horse)
4351 or 4291
Coptic calendar 1370–1371
Discordian calendar 2820
Ethiopian calendar 1646–1647
Hebrew calendar 5414–5415
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1710–1711
 - Shaka Samvat 1576–1577
 - Kali Yuga 4755–4756
Holocene calendar 11654
Igbo calendar 654–655
Iranian calendar 1032–1033
Islamic calendar 1064–1065
Japanese calendar Jōō 3
(承応3年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 3987
Minguo calendar 258 before ROC
民前258年
Thai solar calendar 2197


Year 1654 (MDCLIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

January–June[edit]

The original Magdeburg hemispheres and Guericke's vacuum pump in the Deutsches Museum, Munich, Germany

July–December[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 266. ISBN 0-304-35730-8. 
  2. ^ "Guericke, Otto von". Encyclopædia Britannica 9 (11th ed.). The Encyclopaedia Britannica Co. 1910. p. 670. 
  3. ^ Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 185–186. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  4. ^ "Jews arrive in the New World". American Jewish Archives. Retrieved 2012-07-10. 
  5. ^ LeElef, Ner (2001). "World Jewish Population". SimpleToRemember. Retrieved 2012-07-10. Metropolitan Tel Aviv, with 2.5 million Jews, is the world's largest Jewish city. It is followed by New York, with 1.9 million.