Eribulin

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Eribulin
Eribulin.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
2-(3-Amino-2-hydroxypropyl)hexacosahydro-3-methoxy- 26-methyl-20,27-bis(methylene)11,15-18,21-24,28-triepoxy- 7,9-ethano-12,15-methano-9H,15H-furo(3,2-i)furo(2',3'-5,6) pyrano(4,3-b)(1,4)dioxacyclopentacosin-5-(4H)-one
Clinical data
Trade names Halaven
AHFS/Drugs.com Consumer Drug Information
MedlinePlus a611007
Licence data US FDA:link
Pregnancy cat.
Legal status
Routes Intravenous
Identifiers
CAS number 253128-41-5 N
ATC code L01XX41
PubChem CID 17755248
ChemSpider 21396142 YesY
UNII LR24G6354G YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL1237028 N
Chemical data
Formula C40H59NO11 
Mol. mass 729.90 g/mol
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Eribulin is an anticancer drug marketed by Eisai Co. under the trade name Halaven. Eribulin mesylate was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on November 15, 2010, to treat patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received at least two prior chemotherapy regimens for late-stage disease, including both anthracycline- and taxane-based chemotherapies.[1] It was approved by Health Canada on December 14, 2011 for treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who have previously received at least two chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of metastatic disease.[2]

Eribulin is also being investigated by Eisai Co. for use in a variety of other solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer, prostate cancer and sarcoma.[3]

Eribulin has been previously known as E7389 and ER-086526, and also carries the US NCI designation NSC-707389.

Structure and mechanism[edit]

Structurally, eribulin is a fully synthetic macrocyclic ketone analogue of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B,[4][5] the latter being a potent naturally-occurring mitotic inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action found in the Halichondria genus of sponges.[6][7] Eribulin is a mechanistically-unique inhibitor of microtubule dynamics,[8][9] binding predominantly to a small number of high affinity sites at the plus ends of existing microtubules.[10] Eribulin exerts its anticancer effects by triggering apoptosis of cancer cells following prolonged and irreversible mitotic blockade.[11][12]

A new synthetic route to E7389 was published in 2009.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FDA approves new treatment option for late-stage breast cancer" (Press release). USFDA. 2010-11-15. Retrieved November 15, 2010. 
  2. ^ Notice of Decision for HALAVEN
  3. ^ http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=eribulin+OR+E7389
  4. ^ Towle MJ, Salvato KA, Budrow J, Wels BF, Kuznetsov G, Aalfs KK, Welsh S, Zheng W, Seletsky BM, Palme MH, Habgood GJ, Singer LA, Dipietro LV, Wang Y, Chen JJ, Quincy DA, Davis A, Yoshimatsu K, Kishi Y, Yu MJ, Littlefield BA (February 2001). "In vitro and in vivo anticancer activities of synthetic macrocyclic ketone analogues of halichondrin B". Cancer Res. 61 (3): 1013–21. PMID 11221827. 
  5. ^ Yu MJ, Kishi Y, Littlefield BA (2005). "Discovery of E7389, a fully synthetic macrocyclic ketone analogue of halichondrin B". In Newman DJ, Kingston DGI, Cragg, GM. Anticancer agents from natural products. Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0-8493-1863-7. 
  6. ^ Hirata Y, Uemura D (1986). "Halichondrins - antitumor polyether macrolides from a marine sponge". Pure Appl. Chem. 58 (5): 701–710. doi:10.1351/pac198658050701. 
  7. ^ Bai RL, Paull KD, Herald CL, Malspeis L, Pettit GR, Hamel E (August 1991). "Halichondrin B and homohalichondrin B, marine natural products binding in the vinca domain of tubulin. Discovery of tubulin-based mechanism of action by analysis of differential cytotoxicity data". J. Biol. Chem. 266 (24): 15882–9. PMID 1874739. 
  8. ^ Jordan MA, Kamath K, Manna T, Okouneva T, Miller HP, Davis C, Littlefield BA, Wilson L (July 2005). "The primary antimitotic mechanism of action of the synthetic halichondrin E7389 is suppression of microtubule growth". Mol. Cancer Ther. 4 (7): 1086–95. doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-04-0345. PMID 16020666. 
  9. ^ Okouneva T, Azarenko O, Wilson L, Littlefield BA, Jordan MA (July 2008). "Inhibition of Centromere Dynamics by Eribulin (E7389) during Mitotic Metaphase". Mol. Cancer Ther. 7 (7): 2003–11. doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-08-0095. PMC 2562299. PMID 18645010. 
  10. ^ Smith JA, Wilson L, Azarenko O, Zhu X, Lewis BM, Littlefield BA, Jordan MA (February 2010). "Eribulin Binds at Microtubule Ends to a Single Site on Tubulin to Suppress Dynamic Instability". Biochemistry 49 (6): 1331–7. doi:10.1021/bi901810u. PMC 2846717. PMID 20030375. 
  11. ^ Kuznetsov G, Towle MJ, Cheng H, Kawamura T, TenDyke K, Liu D, Kishi Y, Yu MJ, Littlefield BA (August 2004). "Induction of morphological and biochemical apoptosis following prolonged mitotic blockage by halichondrin B macrocyclic ketone analog E7389". Cancer Res. 64 (16): 5760–6. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-04-1169. PMID 15313917. 
  12. ^ Towle MJ, Salvato KA, Wels BF, Aalfs KK, Zheng W, Seletsky BM, Zhu X, Lewis BM, Kishi Y, Yu MJ, Littlefield BA (January 2011). "Eribulin induces irreversible mitotic blockade: implications of cell-based pharmacodynamics for in vivo efficacy under intermittent dosing conditions". Cancer Res. 71 (2): 496–505. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1874. PMID 21127197. 
  13. ^ Kim DS, Dong CG, Kim JT, Guo H, Huang J, Tiseni PS, Kishi Y (November 2009). "New syntheses of E7389 C14-C35 and halichondrin C14-C38 building blocks: double-inversion approach". J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131 (43): 15636–41. doi:10.1021/ja9058475. PMID 19807076. 

External links[edit]