Timeline of modern Armenian history

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Post-Armenian Genocide timeline)
Jump to: navigation, search

Turkish rule and transition to Russian rule (1804–1914)[edit]

Capture of Erivan in 1827 by the Russian forces marked the transition of Persian rule to Russian rule of Eastern Armenia
Armenia was divided between Russian and Ottoman empires in early 20th century.

Armenian national liberation movement[edit]

Armed movement (1889–1907)[edit]

Second Constitution Era (1908–1914)[edit]

World War I and Armenian Genocide (1914–1918)[edit]

Map of massacre locations and deportation and extermination centers during the Armenian Genocide
About 1.5 million Armenians were killed during the Armenian Genocide in 1915-1918.

First Republic of Armenia (1918–1920)[edit]

The flag and the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia.

Soviet Armenia and the Armenian diaspora (1920–1991)[edit]

The flag and the coat of arms of Soviet Armenia.
Armenian Communist leader Aghasi Khanjian and "the main poet of the 20th century" Yeghishe Charents were among those who fell victim to the Great Purge.[1]

Interwar period (1920–1938)[edit]

Armenian generals of the Soviet Army during WWII: Marshal Ivan Bagramyan, Chief of Staff of the Navy Ivan Isakov, Chief Marshal of the Mechanized Forces Hamazasp Babadzhanian, Marshal of Aviation Sergei Khudyakov.

World War II (1939–1945)[edit]

Cold War (1946–1987)[edit]

The Armenian Secret Army for the Liberation of Armenia carried out a number of armed attacks on Turkish embassies around the world in the 1980s.

Karabakh conflict and independence of Armenia (1987–present)[edit]

The 1994 ceasefire ended the Nagorno-Karabakh War with the Armenian forces establishing de facto control on the disputed area
The flag and the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia.
Vazgen Sargsyan led the Armenian forces during the Nagorno-Karabakh war
  • 1987 September: the Union for National Self-Determination, the first non-Communist party, founded in Yerevan by Paruyr Hayrikyan.
  • 1987 October 18: A minor rally on Freedom Square, Yerevan for the unification of Karabakh with Armenia.[6]
  • 1988 February 12: First protests in Stepanakert.
  • 1988 February 18–26: Major demonstrations held in Yerevan demanding the unification of Karabakh with Armenia.[7][8]
  • 1988 February 20: NKAO Supreme Council issued a request to transfer the region to Soviet Armenia.[9]
  • 1988 February 22–23: Local Armenians and Azerbaijanis clash in Askeran, resulting in several deaths.
  • 1988 February 27–29: Sumgait pogrom starts, Armenians of Azerbaijani start to leave in large numbers[10]
  • 1988 March 9: Gorbachev meets with the leaders of Armenia and Azerbaijan Karen Demirchyan and Kamran Baghirov in Moscow to discuss the public demands of unification of Armenia and Karabakh.[11]
  • 1988 March 22: Over 100,000 people discontented with the tendencies demonstrate in Yerevan.[12]
  • 1988 March 23: The Soviet Supreme Soviet rejects the demand of NKAO Regional Party. On March 25 Gorbachev rejects Armenian claims, forbade demonstrations in Yerevan.[12]
  • 1988 March 26: Despite not being authorized by the Moscow government, tens of thousands demonstrate in Yerevan.[13]
  • 1988 March 30: NKAO Communist Party adopts a resolution demanding unification.[13]
  • 1988 May 21: Karen Demirchyan resigns.
  • 1988 May 28: Flag of Armenia first raised in front of Matenadaran.[14]
  • 1988 June 15: Soviet Armenian Supreme Council votes in favor of the unification of NKAO.[14]
  • 1988 June 17: Soviet Azerbaijani Supreme Council opposes the transfer of NKAO to Armenia.[14]
  • 1988 June 28–29: Conference of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union dissaproves Armenian claims to NKAO.[14]
  • 1988 July 5: Soviet troops confronted by protesters in Zvartnots Airport, one man left dead, tens injured.[15]
  • 1988 July 12: NKAO Soviet Council votes in favor of unification with Armenia.[15]
  • 1988 July 18: Soviet Supreme Council refuses Armenian claims.[15]
  • 1988 July 21: Paruyr Hayrikyan deported to Ethiopia.[15]
  • 1988 fall: Around 150,000 Azerbaijanis of Armenia start to leave in large numbers.
  • 1988 September: State of emergency declared in Stepanakert after Armenian and Azerbaijanis clash.
  • 1988 November: Kirovabad pogrom
  • 1988 November 22: Soviet Armenian Supreme Council recognizes the Armenian Genocide.[16]
  • 1988 November 24: State of emergency declared in Yerevan.[16]
  • 1988 December 7: Spitak earthquake.
  • 1988 December 10: Karabakh Committee members arrested, sent to Moscow.[17]
  • 1989 March 16: Metsamor Nuclear Power Plant shut down.
  • 1989 May 31: Karabakh Committee members freed.
  • 1989 December 1: Soviet Armenian Supreme Council and NKAO Supreme Council declare the unification of the two entities [3]
  • 1990 January 13–19: Pogrom of Armenians in Baku.
  • 1990 May 20: Armenian parliamentary election, 1990, pro-independence members form majority.
  • 1990 August 4: Levon Ter-Petrosyan elected chairman of the Supreme Council, de facto leader of Armenia.
  • 1990 August 23: Soviet Armenian Supreme Council declares independence.
  • 1991 April 30–May 15: Soviet and Azeri forces deport thousands of Armenian from Shahumyan during Operation Ring.
  • 1991 August 19–21: 1991 Soviet coup d'état attempt in Moscow
  • 1991 September 2: Nagorno-Karabakh Republic proclaimed in Stepanakert.
  • 1991 September 21: Armenians vote in favor of independence from the Soviet Union.
  • 1991 September 23: Armenian Supreme Council proclaims independence

Levon Ter-Petrosyan presidency (1991–1998)[edit]

Robert Kocharyan presidency (1998–2008)[edit]

Ten people were killed during the anti-government protests on March 1, 2008.

Serzh Sargsyan presidency (2008–present)[edit]

Predicted and scheduled events[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Specific
  1. ^ Coene, Frederik (2010). The Caucasus: an introduction. London: Routledge. p. 204. ISBN 9780415486606. 
  2. ^ Kilbourne Matossian, Mary Allerton (1955). The Impact of Soviet Policies in Armenia. Brill Archive. p. 155. 
  3. ^ Walker, Christopher J. (1980). Armenia The Survival of a Nation. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 355–356. ISBN 0-7099-0210-7. 
  4. ^ "The Shootdown of Flight 60528". National Security Agency. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "Resolution on a political situation on the Armenian question" (PDF). European Parliament. Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  6. ^ "Reports of demonstrations in Yerevan and Clashes in Mountainous Karabagh.". Asbarez. 24 October 1987. Retrieved 29 May 2013. 
  7. ^ Verluise 1995, p. 86.
  8. ^ de Waal 2003, p. 22.
  9. ^ de Waal 2003, p. 10.
  10. ^ Verluise 1995, p. 87.
  11. ^ Verluise 1995, p. 89.
  12. ^ a b Verluise 1995, p. 90.
  13. ^ a b Verluise 1995, p. 91.
  14. ^ a b c d Verluise 1995, p. 92.
  15. ^ a b c d Verluise 1995, p. 93.
  16. ^ a b Verluise 1995, p. 97.
  17. ^ Verluise 1995, p. 99.
  18. ^ "Armenian dram turns 18". PanARMENIAN.Net. 22 November 2011. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  19. ^ "32 Die as Iranian Plane Strays, Crashes in Karabakh War Zone". Los Angeles Times. 19 March 1994. Retrieved 25 June 2013. 
  20. ^ "Timeline: Iranian air disasters". The Guardian. 6 December 2005. Retrieved 25 June 2013. 
  21. ^ "Bomb in Armenia Kills 14, Hurts 46". Los Angeles Times. 6 September 1994. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  22. ^ "First Pan Armenian Games Begin". Asbarez. 30 August 1999. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  23. ^ "Pan Armenian Games End Amid Fanfare and Excitement". Asbarez. 7 September 1999. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  24. ^ "Armenia Marks Independence Anniversary With Military Parade". Asbarez. 21 September 1999. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  25. ^ "Armenia Diaspora Conference Begins in Yerevan". Asbarez. 22 September 1999. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  26. ^ "Diasporan and Armenian Party Reps Speak At Armenia Diaspora Conference". Asbarez. 23 September 1999. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  27. ^ "Hostage stand-off in Armenian parliament". BBC News. 27 October 1999. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  28. ^ "Armenia's prime minister killed in parliament shooting". CNN. 27 October 1999. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  29. ^ "Gunmen Take Over Armenian Parliament; Premier Killed". Associated Press. 27 October 1999. Retrieved 6 April 2013. 
  30. ^ "Armenian prime minister killed in 'coup bid'". The Guardian. 27 October 1999. Retrieved 6 April 2013. 
  31. ^ "Gunmen Kill Premier in Armenian Attack". Los Angeles Times. 28 October 1999. Retrieved 6 April 2013. 
  32. ^ "Terror in parliament". San Francisco Chronicle. 27 October 1999. Retrieved 6 April 2013. 
  33. ^ "Prime Minister and Others Slain in Armenian Siege". The New York Times. 28 October 1999. Retrieved 12 April 2013. 
  34. ^ "The Rise amf Fall of Samvel Babayan". Armenian News Network / Groong. 6 October 2004. Retrieved 10 June 2013. 
  35. ^ "Ex-Chief of Security: Siradeghyan should have a chance to prove his innocence in court". ArmeniaNow. 26 July 2012. Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  36. ^ "Pope John Paul II has arrived in Yerevan". PanARMENIAN.Net'. 25 September 2001. Retrieved 23 December 2012. 
  37. ^ "Pope avoids Armenia controversy". BBC News. 26 September 2001. Retrieved 23 December 2012. 
  38. ^ Pullella, Philip (27 September 2001). "Pope mourns Armenia's lost generation". The Guardian. Retrieved 23 December 2012. 
  39. ^ Payaslian, Simon (2007). The History of Armenia. Macmillan. p. 225. ISBN 9781403974679. 
  40. ^ "Parliament Gunmen Jailed for Life". Asbarez. 2 December 2003. Retrieved 11 June 2013. 
  41. ^ "Azerbajani Kills Armenian at Peace Program". Associated Press. 19 February 2004. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  42. ^ "Armenian Officer Axe Murdered By Azeri Colleague in Hungary". Asbarez. 19 February 2004. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  43. ^ Arnold, Chloe (13 April 2004). "Armenians march against president". BBC News. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  44. ^ Karapetian, Rita (15 April 2004). "Armenian President Cracks Down". Institute for War and Peace Reporting. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  45. ^ Ավարտվեց «Որոտան-Արփա» թունելի շինարարությունը. AZG Daily (in Armenian). 27 April 2004. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  46. ^ "Armenian people united around Aragats mountain". PanARMENIAN.Net. 28 May 2005. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  47. ^ "On August 25, 2006 Silva Kaputikyan Died". 1in.am. 25 August 2012. Retrieved 6 June 2013. 
  48. ^ "ANCA calls for assertive advocacy at Armenia-Diaspora Conference". Armenian National Committee of America. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  49. ^ "Military parade is over in Yerevan: Armenian tricolor in the sky and 15 artillery salvos (photo report)". REGNUM News Agency. 21 September 2006. Retrieved 6 June 2013. 
  50. ^ "Turkish-Armenian writer shunned silence". BBC News. 19 January 2007. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  51. ^ "Armenian-Turkish journalist shot dead". The Guardian. 19 January 2007. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  52. ^ "Iran, Armenia open gas pipeline". BBC News. 19 March 2007. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
  53. ^ "Iranian, Armenian Presidents Inaugurate Gas Pipeline". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 19 March 2007. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
  54. ^ "Armenian Government Resigns Following Premier's Death". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 25 March 2007. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  55. ^ "Polls close in Armenian election". BBC News. 12 May 2007. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  56. ^ "Russia Transfers Akhalkalaki Military Base to Georgia". Civil Georgia. 27 June 2007. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  57. ^ HRW 2009, p. 12.
  58. ^ "House Panel Raises Furor on Armenian Genocide". New York Times. 11 October 2007. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  59. ^ "House committee approves Armenian genocide resolution". CNN. 10 October 2007. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  60. ^ "Turkey recalls ambassador to U.S. over Armenians". Reuters. 11 October 2007. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  61. ^ "Armenia PM wins presidency poll". BBC News. 20 February 2008. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  62. ^ "Armenia: Sarkisian Claims Disputed Presidential Victory". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 20 February 2008. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  63. ^ "Armenians riot over presidential election result". The Guardian. 20 February 2008. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  64. ^ HRW 2009, p. 35-36.
  65. ^ "Eight killed in Armenia protests". BBC News. 2 March 2008. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  66. ^ "Protesters and Police Clash as Armenia Unrest Grows". The New York Times. 2 March 2008. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  67. ^ "Armenian president declares state of emergency". CNN. 1 March 2008. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  68. ^ "Armenia: Eight Killed After Clashes Between Police, Protesters". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 2 March 2008. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  69. ^ "Armenian National Congress was founded three years ago". News.am. 1 August 2011. Retrieved 10 June 2013. 
  70. ^ "Turkey-Armenia relations boosted by president's historic trip". The Daily Telegraph. 7 September 2008. Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  71. ^ "Gul in landmark visit to Armenia". BBC News. 6 September 2008. Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  72. ^ "Turkey beats Armenia in a historic game attended by both leaders". Hürriyet Daily News. 6 September 2008. Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  73. ^ "Soccer diplomacy brings Turkey's Gul to Armenia". Reuters. 7 September 2008. Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  74. ^ "Old foes Armenia and Turkey put faith in football diplomacy". The Guardian. 4 September 2008. Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  75. ^ Fisher, Daniel (7 May 2011). "The World's Worst Economies". Forbes. Retrieved 5 July 2014. ...Armenia, whose economy shrank by 15% in 2009... 
  76. ^ "40 Armenians Among Caspian Air Crash Victims". Asbarez. 15 July 2009. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  77. ^ "Ruling Party Sweeps Victory in Flawed Yerevan Election". Asbarez. 1 June 2009. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  78. ^ "Ruling Party Sweeps Yerevan Polls As Opposition Cries Foul". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 1 June 2009. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  79. ^ "60,000 protest Armenia-Turkey protocols in Yerevan". The Armenian Reporter. 9 October 2009. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  80. ^ "More Than 60,000 Protest Protocols in Yerevan". Asbarez. 9 October 2009. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  81. ^ "Armenia, Turkey sign historic agreement". CNN. 10 October 2009. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  82. ^ "After Hitch, Turkey and Armenia Normalize Ties". The New York Times. 10 October 2009. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  83. ^ "Armenia and Turkey sign peace deal". The Financial Times. 11 October 2009. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  84. ^ "Turkey and Armenia sign landmark accord... eventually". The Guardian. 10 October 2009. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  85. ^ "Armenia-Turkey sign peace deal, pitfalls ahead". Reuters. 10 October 2009. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  86. ^ "House Panel Says Armenian Deaths Were Genocide". New York Times. 4 March 2010. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  87. ^ "Armenia suspends normalisation of ties with Turkey". BBC News. 22 April 2010. Retrieved 27 July 2013. 
  88. ^ "Armenia Suspends Ratification Of Turkey Deal". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 22 April 2010. Retrieved 27 July 2013. 
  89. ^ "Televised Address by President Serzh Sarkisian". Asbarez. 22 April 2010. Retrieved 27 July 2013. 
  90. ^ "World's Oldest Leather Shoe Found—Stunningly Preserved". National Geographic Magazine. 9 June 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  91. ^ "Russia extends lease on military base in Armenia through 2044". RIA Novosti. 20 August 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  92. ^ "Armenia, Russia Sign Extended Defense Pact". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 20 August 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  93. ^ "And the country with the world's biggest chocolate bar is ... Armenia!". Daily Mail. 11 September 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  94. ^ "Armenian candy company makes world's biggest chocolate bar". The Washington Post. 14 September 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  95. ^ "Armenia sets record for world's largest chocolate bar". Agence France-Presse. 11 September 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  96. ^ "Armenian church brought back to life". BBC News. 19 September 2010. Retrieved 28 June 2013. 
  97. ^ "Armenian Christians celebrate Mass at ancient island church in Turkey in reconciliation effort". Fox News. 19 September 2010. Retrieved 28 June 2013. 
  98. ^ "Church uproar a setback for Turkey-Armenia ties". Washington Post. 20 September 2010. Retrieved 28 June 2013. 
  99. ^ "World's longest cable car line opens in Armenia". Agence France-Presse. 16 October 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  100. ^ "Wings of Tatev: Armenia debuts "world’s longest aerial tramway"". ArmeniaNow. 18 October 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  101. ^ "Armenia Launches World’s Longest Aerial Tramway". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 17 October 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  102. ^ "Earliest Known Winery Found in Armenian Cave". National Geographic Magazine. 10 January 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  103. ^ "Scientists find 'oldest ever' winery in Armenia". Agence France-Presse. 11 January 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  104. ^ "Cave Drops Hints to Earliest Glass of Red". The New York Times. 11 January 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  105. ^ "World's earliest known winery discovered in Armenia". The Daily Telegraph. 11 January 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  106. ^ "Armenian opposition marches on Yerevan's central square". RIA Novosti. 17 March 2011. Retrieved 27 May 2013. 
  107. ^ "Armenian Opposition Reoccupies Key Square As Protests Grow In Strength". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 18 March 2011. Retrieved 27 May 2013. 
  108. ^ "Armenia Parades Military Might On Independence Day". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 21 September 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  109. ^ "Independence Day: Armenia holds September 21 military parade (photogallery)". ArmeniaNow. 21 September 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  110. ^ "Armenians delighted with military parade". PanARMENIAN.Net. 21 September 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  111. ^ "France Approves Armenian Genocide Bill". Voice of America. 21 December 2011. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  112. ^ "Turkey Imposes Sanctions for French Genocide Bill". Voice of America. 21 December 2011. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  113. ^ "Yerevan named World Book Capital, 2012". UNESCO. 2 July 2010. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
  114. ^ "French Senate Passes Armenian Genocide Bill; Turkey Outraged". Voice of America. 22 January 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  115. ^ "French court overturns Armenian genocide denial law". CNN. 28 February 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  116. ^ "French Court Overturns French Genocide Denial Law; Turkey Welcomes Ruling". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 28 February 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  117. ^ "Armenian president's party 'to keep power'". Al Jazeera. 6 May 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  118. ^ "Armenia ruling party wins parliamentary election". BBC News. 7 May 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  119. ^ "Widespread Irregularities Mar Armenian Election". Asbarez. 7 May 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  120. ^ "Blunder in Budapest". The Economist. 4 September 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  121. ^ "Armenia: Dispute Darkens Relations With Hungary". The New York Times. 31 August 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  122. ^ "Armenia breaks ties with Hungary over clemency for murderer". Russia Today. 31 August 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  123. ^ "Incumbent Wins Easy Victory in Armenia". The New York Times. 19 February 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  124. ^ "Armenian President Sargsyan Secures Second Term in Office". RIA Novosti. 19 February 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  125. ^ "Armenian Opposition Leader Rejects Official Results Of Presidential Vote". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 19 February 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  126. ^ "Thousands Rally Around Hovannisian". Asbarez. 20 February 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  127. ^ "Hovannisian Rejects Official Vote Results". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 19 February 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  128. ^ "Police Clash with Opposition Protesters". Asbarez. 9 April 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  129. ^ "Another clash of police and citizens". A1plus. 9 April 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  130. ^ "Clash Between Police Officers and the People". Aravot. 9 April 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  131. ^ "Ruling Party Wins Big In Disputed Yerevan Vote". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 6 May 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  132. ^ "Yerevan municipality cancels decision: Transport fares will not rise". News.am. 25 July 2013. Retrieved 25 July 2013. 
  133. ^ "Fares 100 drams again in Armenia’s capital". Tert.am. 25 July 2013. Retrieved 25 July 2013. 
  134. ^ "The EU meets Eastern Partnership foreign ministers ahead of November summit". European External Action Service. Retrieved 25 June 2013. In Vilnius the EU is hoping to see the signature of the Association Agreement with Ukraine, provided the benchmarks set in December 2012 are met. The EU also wants to see the finalisation of negotiations on Association Agreements, including Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Areas, with Moldova, Georgia and Armenia which could lead to the initialling of the Association Agreements by Vilnius. 
  135. ^ Peter, Laurence (5 September 2013). "Armenia rift over trade deal fuels EU-Russia tension". BBC News. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  136. ^ Coalson, Robert (4 September 2013). "News Analysis: Armenia's Choice Stirs Competition Between Moscow, EU". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  137. ^ "Armenia Signs Up To Russian-Led Economic Union". RFE/RL. 10 October 2014. Retrieved 13 October 2014. 
  138. ^ "Armenian Parliament Ratifies Eurasian Economic Union Treaty". RFE/RL. 4 December 2014. 
  139. ^ Danielyan, Emil (29 May 2009). "Armenia Presses Ahead with Nuclear Power Plant Construction". Jamestown Foundation. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  140. ^ "Armenian President Signals New Delay In Nuclear Plant Closure". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 7 December 2011. Retrieved 25 June 2013. 
General

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]