Rockleigh, New Jersey

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Rockleigh, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Rockleigh
Map highlighting Rockleigh's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Rockleigh's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Rockleigh, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Rockleigh, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°00′01″N 73°56′03″W / 41.000241°N 73.934068°W / 41.000241; -73.934068Coordinates: 41°00′01″N 73°56′03″W / 41.000241°N 73.934068°W / 41.000241; -73.934068[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated April 10, 1923
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Robert R. Schaffer (R, term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator William J. McGuire[4]
 • Clerk Marcella Giampiccolo[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 0.976 sq mi (2.528 km2)
 • Land 0.969 sq mi (2.509 km2)
 • Water 0.007 sq mi (0.019 km2)  0.75%
Area rank 501st of 566 in state
66th of 70 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 49 ft (15 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 531
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 535
 • Rank 554th of 566 in state
69th of 70 in county[12]
 • Density 548.1/sq mi (211.6/km2)
 • Density rank 437th of 566 in state
68th of 70 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07647[13][14]
Area code(s) 201 exchanges: 750, 767, 768, 784[15]
FIPS code 3400364170[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885375[1][18]
Website www.rockleigh.org

Rockleigh (pronounced ROCK-lee[citation needed]) is an affluent upper middle and upper class borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 531,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 140 (+35.8%) from the 391 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 121 (+44.8%) from the 270 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] Bordering Alpine, New Jersey, a town ranked America's most expensive zip code by Forbes, Rockleigh exudes a similar feeling with large single family homes on large plots of land. Although a more low-profile town with established families than more high profile nouveau riche neighboring towns, Rockleigh is known for preserving Old World charm and its historic roots as a Dutch colonial settlement. The very few new residents of the town are attracted by its privacy, exclusivity and countryside atmosphere just minutes from modern conveniences, multicultural ethnic neighborhoods, the Hudson River, and Manhattan.

Rockleigh was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 13, 1923 (based on the results of a referendum held on April 10, 1923) from portions of Northvale.[20][21] The borough was named for a property in Virginia that had been owned by the borough's first mayor.[22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Rockleigh as its 13th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[23]

Geography[edit]

Rockleigh is at 41°00′01″N 73°56′03″W / 41.000241°N 73.934068°W / 41.000241; -73.934068 (41.000241,-73.934068). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 0.976 square miles (2.528 km2), of which 0.969 square miles (2.509 km2) of it was land and 0.007 square miles (0.019 km2) of it (0.75%) was water.[1][2] It is about 25 miles (40 km) from Manhattan in New York City.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 32
1910 44 37.5%
1920 58 31.8%
1930 86 48.3%
1940 79 −8.1%
1950 110 39.2%
1960 430 290.9%
1970 308 −28.4%
1980 192 −37.7%
1990 270 40.6%
2000 391 44.8%
2010 531 35.8%
Est. 2013 535 [11][24] 0.8%
Population sources:
1930[25] 1900-2010[26][27][28]
2000[29][30] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 531 people, 75 households, and 57.98 families residing in the borough. The population density was 548.1 per square mile (211.6 /km2). There were 86 housing units at an average density of 88.8 per square mile (34.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.10% (505) White, 2.07% (11) Black or African American, 0.19% (1) Native American, 1.51% (8) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.19% (1) from other races, and 0.94% (5) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.77% (20) of the population.[8]

There were 75 households, of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.7% were married couples living together, 4.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.7% were non-families. 13.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.28.[8]

In the borough, 16.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 2.8% from 18 to 24, 8.9% from 25 to 44, 15.1% from 45 to 64, and 57.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 73.8 years. For every 100 females there were 58.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 47.4 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $137,778 (with a margin of error of +/- $87,096) and the median family income was $139,861 (+/- $77,779). Males had a median income of $76,719 (+/- $48,274) versus $70,3136 (+/- $43,416) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,771 (+/- $23,965). About 0.0% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Same-sex couples headed none of the borough's households in either 2000 or 2010.[32]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 391 people, 74 households, and 58 families residing in the borough. The population density was 402.2 people per square mile (155.6/km2). There were 80 housing units at an average density of 82.3 per square mile (31.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 89.77% White, 3.32% African American, 0.26% Native American, 3.84% Asian, 1.02% from other races, and 1.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.86% of the population.[29][30]

There were 74 households out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.6% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 10.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.04 and the average family size was 3.40.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 15.6% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 32.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 68.4 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $152,262, and the median income for a family was $157,816. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $66,250 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $48,935. None of the families and 23.1% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no one under eighteen and none of those over 64.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Rockleigh is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Rockleigh, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[33] Public meetings of the Mayor and Council are held on a regular basis for conducting borough business.

As of 2013, the Mayor of Rockleigh is Republican Robert R. Schaffer, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Rockleigh Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee assignments listed in parentheses) are Council President Frank Cumiskey (R, 2014; Public Works, Public Safety and Finance-Insurance), Marilyn A. Bresnak (R, 2015; Building/Historic Liaison), Sherl Ewald (R, 2013; Building/Historic Liaison), Douglas Johnsen (R, 2014; Building/Historic Liaison and Public Safety as chair, Public Works), John Mender (R, 2015; Public Works as chair, Finance-Insurance) and James Pontone (R, 2013; Finance-Insurance as chair, Public Safety).[5][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41]

In elections held in November 2010, Robert R. Schaffer ran a successful write-in campaign and defeated incumbent mayor Nick Langella by a 2-1 margin. Councilmembers Shirl Ewald and James Pontone were re-elected.[40]

Law enforcement services in Rockleigh are provided under contract by the Northvale Police Department.[42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Rockleigh is located in the 5th Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 37th state legislative district.[9][44][45] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Rockleigh had been in the 39th state legislative district.[46]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[50][51]

The 37th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Loretta Weinberg (D, Teaneck) and in the General Assembly by Valerie Huttle (D, Englewood) and Gordon M. Johnson (D, Englewood).[52] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[53] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[54]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[55] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[56] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[57] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[58] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[59] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[60] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[61] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[62] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[63] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[64][65] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[66] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[67] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[68][69][55]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 229 registered voters in Rockleigh, of which 59 (25.8% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 70 (30.6% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 99 (43.2% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 1 voters registered to other parties.[70] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 43.1% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 51.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[70][71]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 89 votes here (53.6% vs. 43.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 76 votes (45.8% vs. 54.8%) and other candidates with 1 votes (0.6% vs. 0.9%), among the 166 ballots cast by the borough's 260 registered voters, for a turnout of 63.8% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[72][73] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 97 votes here (49.2% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 95 votes (48.2% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with votes (0.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 197 ballots cast by the borough's 281 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.1% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[74][75] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 100 votes here (50.5% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 96 votes (48.5% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 1 votes (0.5% vs. 0.7%), among the 198 ballots cast by the borough's 272 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.8% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[76]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70 votes here (55.6% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 51 votes (40.5% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 5 votes (4.0% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with votes (0.0% vs. 0.5%), among the 126 ballots cast by the borough's 258 registered voters, yielding a 48.8% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[77]

Education[edit]

Students from Rockleigh, a non-operating school district, attend the Northvale Public Schools in the Borough of Northvale as part of a sending/receiving relationship. The Rockleigh Borough Board of Education is a five-member board with the members appointed by the mayor since 2005. The district's last elected term expired in 2007 at which time the board consisted entirely of mayoral appointees.[78][79] Schools in the Northvale district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[80]) are Thomas Jefferson School (Kindergarten through 3rd grade, 243 students) and Nathan Hale School (grades 4 - 8, 341 students).[81] As of the 2012-13 school year, the two schools were combined to created the Northfield Public School, as part of an effort to reduce costs associated with running two separate schools that share a common campus and corridor.[82]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan, together with students from Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood and Old Tappan,[83] with students from Rockleigh attending the high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[78] The school is one of the two schools of the Northern Valley Regional High School District, which also serves students from the neighboring communities of Closter, Demarest, Haworth at the Northern Valley Regional High School at Demarest.[84]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[85][86]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 4.56 miles (7.34 km) of roadways, of which 2.74 miles (4.41 km) were maintained by the municipality and 1.82 miles (2.93 km) by Bergen County.[87]

County Route 501 passes through Rockleigh. This road's northern terminus is in Rockleigh, where it continues into New York as New York State Route 340.[88]

Public transportation[edit]

Saddle River Tours / Ameribus provides service on routes 20 and 84 to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station.[89]

Corporate residents[edit]

Crestron Electronics, a company that manufacturers high-end systems for home automation and conference room control, is headquartered in Rockleigh.[90]

Volvo Cars of North America, Customer Relations, a Swedish company that manufactures safety-oriented automobiles, maintains an American headquarters in Rockleigh.[91][92]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Rockleigh include:

References[edit]

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  4. ^ Officials, Borough of Rockleigh. Accessed January 31, 2012.
  5. ^ a b Bergen County Directory 2014, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2014.
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  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Rockleigh, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
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  83. ^ Home page, Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 4, 2011. Accessed November 22, 2011. "Welcome to Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan, home of the Golden Knights. Although our students reside in four different towns; Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, and Old Tappan, once they arrive here they are treated as one."
  84. ^ Northern Valley Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 16, 2013. "Located in the upper North Eastern corner of the state, Northern Valley Regional is comprised of two high schools, Demarest and Old Tappan and the Region III special educational program that services students across the spectrum. There are seven local communities that send their students to the regional high schools: Closter, Demarest, Harrington Park, Haworth, Northvale, Norwood and Old Tappan."
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  94. ^ Sisario, Ben. "Hy Weiss, 84, Music Executive From Rock ’n’ Roll’s Early Days, Dies", The New York Times, March 31, 2007. Accessed November 4, 2013. "Hy Weiss, a music executive from the hardscrabble early days of rock ’n’ roll, died on March 20 in Englewood, N.J. He was 84 and lived in Rockleigh, N.J."

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