Oakland, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other places with the same name, see Oakland (disambiguation).
Oakland, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Oakland
Map highlighting Oakland's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Oakland's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Oakland, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Oakland, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°01′48″N 74°14′38″W / 41.02998°N 74.243842°W / 41.02998; -74.243842Coordinates: 41°01′48″N 74°14′38″W / 41.02998°N 74.243842°W / 41.02998; -74.243842[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated April 8, 1902
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Linda H. Schwager (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Richard Kunze[4]
 • Clerk Lisa Duncan[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 8.728 sq mi (22.605 km2)
 • Land 8.454 sq mi (21.897 km2)
 • Water 0.274 sq mi (0.709 km2)  3.13%
Area rank 222nd of 566 in state
5th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 233 ft (71 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 12,754
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 12,873
 • Rank 190th of 566 in state
25th of 70 in county[11]
 • Density 1,508.6/sq mi (582.5/km2)
 • Density rank 335th of 566 in state
64th of 70 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07436[12][13]
Area code(s) 201[14]
FIPS code 3400353850[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885330[17][2]
Website oakland-nj.org

Oakland is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 12,754,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 288 (+2.3%) from the 12,466 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 469 (+3.9%) from the 11,997 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Oakland was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 8, 1902, from portions of Franklin Township.[19] The name comes from the white oak trees in the area.[20]

History[edit]

The Van Allen House was built in 1748 and was a stop for George Washington and his troops in 1777.[21]

From the 1940s through the end of the 1960s a summer bungalow colony was developed in a valley in West Oakland on the Ramapo River. This was a refuge for a close-knit group of several score families from the summer heat of New York City and urban New Jersey. During the summer months the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad provided service at a West Oakland passenger station. This colony was located on the road between Oakland and Pompton Lakes, near a training camp for boxers. In the early morning, a resident could see Joe Louis or Sugar Ray Robinson, among others, running past the summer homes.[citation needed]

One section of streets in the town are named after Native American tribes and Native American first names. Now considered politically incorrect, the borough had a wooden sign posted downtown that read "Once there was [sic] Indians all over this place" which had been donated by a resident who insisted on the wording of the sign as having been a quotation from an author.[22]

FRG Park shootout[edit]

On August 4, 1985, a gun shootout occurred at the FRG Sports Complex[23] — formerly known as Muller's Park — directly next to Oakland's former swimming park located along the Ramapo River called Pleasureland.[24] Some time around 4:30 p.m. gunfire between rival Jamaican gangs, who were bused-in from out of town, broke out resulting in two deaths and a number of injuries.[25] Before the incident, Pleasureland and Muller's Park were popular summer destinations that had since the 1950s and earlier (Muller's was built in 1935) attracted families from across the Tri-state area. Pleasureland remained open for a brief period after the shooting incident at FRG, but FRG/Muller's Park never reopened after that day.[26] While the shootout did not occur at Pleasureland, due to the park's popularity the events remain to this day known as the "Pleasureland Shootout" and "Pleasureland Massacre" among people outside of Oakland. Both properties currently remain abandoned, the pools and buildings having since been demolished and filled in. The properties still remain vacant but hopes to open a new as Great Oak Park in 2014 as a passive recreation park with plans for more elaborate passive recreation in the near future. The borough has been working on bringing the 40 acre park back to life since January 2012.

Geography[edit]

Oakland is located at 41°01′48″N 74°14′38″W / 41.02998°N 74.243842°W / 41.02998; -74.243842 (41.02998,-74.243842). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 8.728 square miles (22.605 km2), of which, 8.454 square miles (21.897 km2) of it was land and 0.274 square miles (0.709 km2) of it (3.13%) was water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 479
1910 568 18.6%
1920 497 −12.5%
1930 735 47.9%
1940 932 26.8%
1950 1,817 95.0%
1960 9,446 419.9%
1970 14,420 52.7%
1980 13,443 −6.8%
1990 11,997 −10.8%
2000 12,466 3.9%
2010 12,754 2.3%
Est. 2012 12,873 [10] 0.9%
Population sources:
1910-1920[27] 1910[28]
1910-1930[29] 1900-2010[30][31][32]
2000[33][34] 2010[7][8][9]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 12,754 people, 4,335 households, and 3,568 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,508.6 per square mile (582.5 /km2). There were 4,470 housing units at an average density of 528.7 per square mile (204.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.71% (11,824) White, 0.89% (113) Black or African American, 0.19% (24) Native American, 4.17% (532) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.49% (62) from other races, and 1.55% (198) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.34% (681) of the population.[7]

There were 4,335 households, of which 39.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.3% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.7% were non-families. 14.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.22.[7]

In the borough, 26.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 22.3% from 25 to 44, 31.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.8 years. For every 100 females there were 95.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.9 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $111,390 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,160) and the median family income was $114,973 (+/- $7,378). Males had a median income of $82,750 (+/- $6,931) versus $59,349 (+/- $7,903) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $43,651 (+/- $3,082). About 0.7% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Same-sex couples headed 21 households in 2010, an increase from the 18 counted in 2000.[36]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 12,466 people, 4,255 households, and 3,565 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,448.9 people per square mile (559.7/km2). There were 4,345 housing units at an average density of 505.0 per square mile (195.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.76% White, 0.78% African American, 0.06% Native American, 2.70% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.70% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.87% of the population.[33][34]

There were 4,255 households out of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.4% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.2% were non-families. 12.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.88 and the average family size was 3.15.[33][34]

In the borough the population was spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.0 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the borough was $86,629, and the median income for a family was $93,695. Males had a median income of $62,336 versus $41,092 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,252. About 0.9% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Oakland is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large on a partisan basis during the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Oakland, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances, which can be overridden with a 2/3 vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, with most appointments made by the mayor subject to the advice and consent of the council.[37]

As of 2013, the Mayor of the Borough of Oakland is Democrat Linda H. Schwager, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. The members of the Oakland Borough Council are Council President Chris Visconti (R, 2015), Sandra Coira (D, 2014), Timothy Jensen (R, 2016), Eric Kulmula (R, 2016), Pat Pignatelli (R, 2015) and Elizabeth Stagg (R, 2014).[38][39][40][41][42][43][44]

There are three firehouses located in Oakland. The central station is located on Yawpo Avenue just off Ramapo Valley Road in downtown Oakland. There is one police station and it is located on Ramapo Valley Road across from the intersection with Walnut Street.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Oakland is located in the 5th Congressional District[45] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[8][46][47] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Oakland had been in the 40th state legislative district.[48]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[50][51] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[52][53]

The 39th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Bob Schroeder (R, Washington Township, Bergen County).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[57] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[58] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[59] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[60] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[61] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[62] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[63] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[64] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[65] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[66][67] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[68] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[69] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[70][71][57]

Highlands protection[edit]

The Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act regulates development in portions of Oakland and Mahwah that are included in the New Jersey Highlands geographic region.

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 8,542 registered voters in Oakland, of which 1,718 (20.1% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,700 (31.6% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 4,116 (48.2% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered to other parties.[72] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 67.0% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 90.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[72][73]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 3,631 votes here (55.4% vs. 43.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,845 votes (43.4% vs. 54.8%) and other candidates with 80 votes (1.2% vs. 0.9%), among the 6,555 ballots cast by the borough's 8,952 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[74][75] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,900 votes here (54.9% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 3,082 votes (43.4% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 60 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 7,106 ballots cast by the borough's 8,974 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.2% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[76][77] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 3,938 votes here (57.3% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,864 votes (41.7% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 46 votes (0.7% vs. 0.7%), among the 6,867 ballots cast by the borough's 8,588 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.0% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[78]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,553 votes here (54.3% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,776 votes (37.8% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 312 votes (6.6% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 23 votes (0.5% vs. 0.5%), among the 4,702 ballots cast by the borough's 8,782 registered voters, yielding a 53.5% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[79]

Education[edit]

Students in Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Oakland Public Schools. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[80]) are three K-5 elementary schools — Dogwood Hill Elementary School[81] (312 students), Heights Elementary School[82] (465 students) and Manito Elementary School[83] (329 students) — and Valley Middle School[84] which serves grades 6 - 8 (580 students).[85]

Public high school students from Oakland in ninth through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District, which also serves students from Franklin Lakes and Wyckoff.[86] Students entering the district as freshmen have the option to attend either of the district's high schools, subject to a choice made during eighth grade.[87][88] Franklin Lakes, Oakland and Wyckoff (FLOW district) approved the creation of a regional high school in 1954 by a vote of 1,060 to 51, with Ramapo High School (in Franklin Lakes) opened in 1957 and Indian Hills High School in 1960.[citation needed] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[89]) are Indian Hills High School, located in Oakland[90] (1,181 students) and Ramapo High School, located in Franklin Lakes[91] (1,145 students).[92]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[93][94]

Private schools include Barnstable Academy, a college preparatory school for students in fifth through twelfth grades located in a business and industrial park off Long Hill Road;[95] The New Jersey Japanese School, which serves Japanese expatriates to prepare them for the Japanese educational system when the students eventually return to Japan, located next to Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church;[96] and the Gerrard Berman Day School (Solomon Schechter of North Jersey), A Jewish day school for students in preschool through eighth grade, located on Spruce Street.[97]

Awards[edit]

Oakland was ranked by Business Week as #43 on its list of "Great Places to Raise Kids -- for Less", with only two places deemed better than Oakland: Matawan (12th) and Echelon near Philadelphia (4th). The criteria were test scores in math and reading, number of schools, cost of living, recreational and cultural activities, and risk of crime.[98] In 2013 Oakland was ranked by New Jersey Monthly as #1 for Young Families "...Oakland is woodsy and a bit remote, but its midsize homes, good schools and low crime rate make it popular with young families"

Transportation[edit]

Oakland's railroad stations

The patch of grass representing the former Oakland Station, which was demolished in 1999, as viewed in October 2011
The former West Oakland station site, as viewed in October 2011, 45 years after station service ended.

Roads and highways[edit]

Oakland had a total of 67.62 miles (108.82 km) of roadways, of which 54.95 miles (88.43 km) are maintained by the borough, 9.45 miles (15.21 km) by Passaic County and 3.22 miles (5.18 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[99]

Major roads through Oakland include Interstate 287 (including exits 57 and 58),[100] Route 208[101] and U.S. Route 202.[102]

Public transportation[edit]

Commuter bus service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City is available from Coach USA via Short Line.[103]

New Jersey Transit bus service is also available on a limited basis via the 752 line (Oakland to Hackensack via Ridgewood).[104]

A freight rail line, the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway, runs through Oakland. There is no commuter rail service in the borough.

Newark Liberty International Airport provides scheduled air service.

Media[edit]

Radio station WVNJ is licensed to Oakland.[105] OaklandPatch provides hyperlocal content about news and events in Oakland, as part of the Patch Media network.[106] The Franklin Lakes / Oakland Suburban News is published weekly, with additional news available online in conjunction with The Record.[107] The Oakland Journal is an online hyper-local news source that covers local political, civic and social events.[108]

Business and Industry[edit]

Oakland's downtown shopping area is along Ramapo Valley Road (U.S. Route 202), with the Copper Tree Mall being the borough's largest single retail establishment.[109]

There are a few industrial parks in Oakland, the biggest of which is off Long Hill Road near the Franklin Lakes border.[110] The Oakland-McBride Center is the home of Royle Systems Group and of Topcon Medical Systems's United States operations.[111]

Russ Berrie and Company, Inc., once headquartered in Oakland, is a major manufacturer of teddy bears and other gift products, including stuffed animals, baby gifts, soft baby toys and development toys as well as picture, candles, figurines and home fragrance products. Russ Berrie and Company, since renamed to Kid Brands, has since moved to Wayne and from there to East Rutherford.[112]

Recreation[edit]

Recreation is run by an all volunteer nine-member Recreation Commission. All members are appointed by the Mayor for a five-year term. There are a number of municipal recreational facilities in Oakland. The largest is a recreational area located off Oak Street, known to residents simply as the "Rec Field," but formally know as the Alexander Potash Recreation Complex, which is home to nine baseball and softball fields, six tennis courts, a roller hockey rink, basketball courts, and other facilities.[113]

New Jersey's Ramapo Mountain State Forest is located in Oakland and can be accessed from Skyline Drive just north of its interchange with I-287.[114]

Camp Tamarack, which was a year round camp operated by the Boy Scouts of America from the late 1920s until the mid-1980s, sits abandoned off of Skyline Drive. The camp ceased all activities and was taken over by the Bergen County park system in 1998.[115] Many of the structures in the camp have been torn down, but some remain standing. Oakland is the current location of the headquarters of the Northern New Jersey Council.[116]

The Rec Field is home to the annual carnival and fireworks that take place during the summer.

Oakland also offers a summer camp which runs for six weeks.[117]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Oakland include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Borough Hall, Borough of Oakland. Accessed May 24, 2011.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 169.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Oakland, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Oakland borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Oakland borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Oakland, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 22, 2011.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Oakland, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 82. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  20. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey State Library, May 1945. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  21. ^ Yorio, Kara. "History calling: Bergen historical sites staging a special open house", The Record (Bergen County), May 18, 2011. Accessed May 24, 2011.
  22. ^ Staff. "New Jersey, a Guide to Its Present and Past", Federal Writers' Project, p. 441. Originally published by Viking Press, 1939, reprinted US History Publishers, 2007. ISBN 1-60354-029-6. Accessed May 24, 2011.
  23. ^ Via Associated Press. "Gang shootout leaves two dead at N.J. swim club", Gainesville Sun, August 5, 1985. Accessed December 22, 2011.
  24. ^ Pleasureland Past, Present,…, The Oakland Journal. Accessed December 22, 2011.
  25. ^ http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendId=381953905&blogId=503839328
  26. ^ via Associated Press. "THE REGION; Complex Reopens Following Slayings", The New York Times, August 12, 1985. Accessed December 11, 2013. "A sports and recreation complex where 2 people were fatally shot and more than 20 were injured during a shootout between patrons on Aug. 11 reopened this weekend. The owner of the 50-acre park, the FRG Sports Complex, said he would not operate it any differently than in the past."
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed December 22, 2011.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 22, 2011.
  31. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  32. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed October 29, 2013. Data for 1900, prior to the borough's formation, was calculated by Bergen County analysts.
  33. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Oakland borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Oakland borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  35. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Oakland borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  36. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  37. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  38. ^ Mayor & Council, Borough of Oakland. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  39. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Oakland. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  40. ^ Bergen County Directory 2012-2013, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  41. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2012, Bergen County Clerk, November 6, 2012. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  42. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2011, Bergen County Clerk, November 17, 2011. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  43. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2010, Bergen County Clerk, November 10, 2010. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  44. ^ Gerace, Joseph M. "Pignatelli, Visconti Re-elected to Oakland Council; Democrats Peter Kikot and Cheryl Piccoli defeated.", OaklandPatch, November 7, 2012. Accessed October 29, 2013. "Initial reports out of Oakland indicate that Republicans Pat Pignatelli and Chris Visconti have won re-election to the borough council, according to several sources."
  45. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  52. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  53. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  55. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  57. ^ a b 2014 County and Municipal Directory, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  58. ^ County Executive, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014
  59. ^ Freeholders, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  60. ^ David L. Ganz, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  61. ^ Joan M. Voss, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  62. ^ John A. Felice, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  63. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  64. ^ Steve Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  65. ^ James, J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  66. ^ Tracy Silna Zur, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  67. ^ Freeholder Board, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  68. ^ About the Clerk, Bergen County Clerk. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  69. ^ About Sheriff Michael Saudino, Bergen County Sheriff's Office. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  70. ^ Michael R. Dressler, Bergen County Surrogate's Court. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  71. ^ Constitutional Officers, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  72. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Bergen, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  73. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  74. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 14, 2013.
  75. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 14, 2013.
  76. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  77. ^ 2008 General Election Results for Oakland, The Record (Bergen County). Accessed December 22, 2011.
  78. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  79. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  80. ^ Data for the Oakland Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  81. ^ Dogwood Hill Elementary School, Oakland Public Schools. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  82. ^ Heights Elementary School, Oakland Public Schools. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  83. ^ Manito Elementary School, Oakland Public Schools. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  84. ^ Valley Middle School, Oakland Public Schools. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  85. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Oakland Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  86. ^ Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 24, 2013. "The Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District serves students from Franklin Lakes, Oakland, and Wyckoff in a comprehensive two-campus setting. Students from the three communities may choose which of the two high schools they wish to attend for their four-year high school experience."
  87. ^ Van Dusen, Matthew. "Ramapo-Indian Hills schools chief to retire.", The Record (Bergen County), October 24, 2007. Accessed December 24, 2013. "Later, parents of Oakland students protested their lack of choice, and students in Wyckoff, Franklin Lakes and Oakland can now attend either school."
  88. ^ Eighth Grade School Choice, Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District. Accessed December 24, 2013. "All eighth grade students from Franklin Lakes, Oakland, and Wyckoff may choose to attend the high school of their choice...."
  89. ^ School Data for the Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  90. ^ Indian Hills High School, Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  91. ^ Ramapo High School, Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  92. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  93. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  94. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  95. ^ About, Barnstable Academy. Accessed October 29, 2013. "Barnstable Academy is a college-prep private school for students in grades 5-12. Here, bright students and diverse learners receive individualized attention in a safe environment and are given the tools and confidence to achieve their highest possible academic and personal achievement."
  96. ^ Directions, The New Jersey Japanese School. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  97. ^ FAQs, The Gerard Berman Day School. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  98. ^ MacMillan, Douglas. "Great Places to Raise Kids -- for Less", Business Week, November 16, 2007. Accessed May 23, 2008.
  99. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  100. ^ Interstate 287 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  101. ^ Route 208 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  102. ^ U.S. Route 202 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  103. ^ Schedule Details Oakland, NJ to New York, NY, Short Line (bus company). Accessed December 11, 2013.
  104. ^ Bergen County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 11, 2010. Accessed August 4, 2011.
  105. ^ Coverage, WVNJ. Accessed December 22, 2011.
  106. ^ About Us, OaklandPatch. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  107. ^ Franklin Lakes / Oakland Suburban News. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  108. ^ The Oakland Journal. Accessed May 23, 2008.
  109. ^ Spiewak, Anna. "Lots to offer at a reasonable cost", The Record (Bergen County), October 24, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2011. "Ramapo Valley Road (Route 202) is considered the main street in the borough, around which the downtown core is centered. The Copper Tree Mall, a strip mall with a small indoor section, is the dominant retail location."
  110. ^ Horsley, Carter B. "INDUSTRIAL ZONES GAIN NEW STATURE", The New York Times, September 20, 1981. Accessed December 26, 2011. "The company has another mixed-use development straddling the border between Oakland and Franklin Lakes in New Jersey where it is building 80 single-family homes on one-acre lots next to the 200-acre Oakland McBride Office and Technical Center."
  111. ^ Verostek, Michael. "Kwartler Associates Sell Oakland-McBride Center for $12M: BD Oakland Partners Purchases Oakland Flex", CoStar Group. May 4, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2011. "Kwartler Associates, Inc., the Wladwick-based asset management corporation, sold Oakland-McBride Center, a 121,000-square-foot flex building located at 11 Bauer Drive in Oakland, NJ to BD Oakland Partners, LP for about $12 million, or about $100 per square foot. Oakland-McBride Center, constructed in 1972, is the headquarters of fiber optics provider Royle Systems Group, and US headquarters of optical device manufacturer Topcon Medical Systems, a subsidiary of Topcon Corporation."
  112. ^ Verdon, Joan. "Kid Brands CEO resigns, board chair takes helm", The Record (Bergen County), September 12, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2011. "Crain was at the helm of the company as it changed its name for Russ Berrie and Co. to Kid Brands, and relocated its headquarters twice, first from Oakland to Wayne, and then to East Rutherford, where the newly streamlined company had 10 employees."
  113. ^ Map of Oakland Recreation Complex, Oakland recreation. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  114. ^ Ramapo Mountain State Forest, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Parks and Forestry. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  115. ^ Camp Tamarack, NY-NJ-CT Botany Online. Accessed October 29, 2013. "1998 -- the camp was purchased from the boy scouts by Bergen County N.J. and by Oakland N.J. with the aid of state funds."
  116. ^ Service Center location, Boys Scouts of America, Northern New Jersey Council. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  117. ^ Oakland Recreation Summer Camp, Borough of Oakland. Accessed December 22, 2011.
  118. ^ Spelling, Ian. "Ennui Enterprise: Oakland native Jonathan Ames strikes gold with Bored to Death", (201) magazine, June 1, 2011. Accessed April 24, 2012. "Ames’ years in Oakland, he notes, helped shape his life and career path. His mother was a teacher and a poet, and his father was a salesman and a voracious reader. He studied at Indian Hills High School."
  119. ^ Barone, Matt. "Happy to Be 'Bored to Death'", Inside Jersey, April 2011. Accessed April 24. 2012. "The prolific 47-year-old writer was born and raised in Oakland, where he attended Indian Hills High School."
  120. ^ via Associated Press. "W. Cary Edwards, New Jersey Public Servant, Dies at 66", The New York Times, October 20, 2010. Accessed October 29, 2013. "OAKLAND, N.J. (AP) — W. Cary Edwards, who served more than 30 years in state government, including as attorney general, died Wednesday at his home here. He was 66."
  121. ^ Alfano, Peter. "SCOT FRANK'S DIAL-A-FIGHT CHALLENGE", The New York Times, September 7, 1983. Accessed August 5, 2012. "The neighbors in Scott Frank's hometown, Oakland, N.J., are probably not surprised. This is just a logical extension of the days when he was in high school and would hold boxing matches in the basement of his parents' home."
  122. ^ Scott Frank, BoxRec. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  123. ^ Longsdorf, Amy. "N.J. writer puts her mark on Hollywood", The Record (Bergen County), July 20, 2009. Accessed August 4, 2011. "Screenwriter and former Oakland resident Karen McCullah Lutz is the first to admit she owes New Jersey a big debt of gratitude. Spending four years at Indian Hills High School sparked her love of Springsteen and the Paramus Park Mall, but Lutz is particularly grateful for an even more lasting Garden State gift."
  124. ^ Bloom, Susan. "Growth Stock: Produce Pete explains why Jersey produce beats all.", New Jersey Monthly, March 14, 2011. Accessed June 28, 2012. "The Jersey born and raised fruit-and-vegetable guru affectionately known as Produce Pete is as authentic as his Bergen County roots and the Garden State produce he proudly promotes.... Though officially retired from the grueling 20-hour workdays of his retail operation, the 66-year-old Oakland resident still relishes the opportunity to help people navigate their local produce aisle or farmer’s market."
  125. ^ Staff. "Oakland's Mike Teel cut by Seattle Seahawks", The Record (Bergen County), May 20, 2010. Accessed February 22, 2011. "Teel, an Oakland native, was a sixth-round draft choice of Seattle in 2009 after his record-setting career at Rutgers."

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]