New Milford, New Jersey

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New Milford, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of New Milford
Nickname(s): The Birthplace of Bergen County[1]
Map highlighting New Milford's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting New Milford's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of New Milford, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of New Milford, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°56′03″N 74°01′10″W / 40.934161°N 74.019453°W / 40.934161; -74.019453Coordinates: 40°56′03″N 74°01′10″W / 40.934161°N 74.019453°W / 40.934161; -74.019453[2][3]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated March 11, 1922
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Ann Subrizi (R, term ends December 31, 2014)[4]
 • Administrator / Clerk Christine Demiris[5]
Area[3]
 • Total 2.308 sq mi (5.978 km2)
 • Land 2.274 sq mi (5.890 km2)
 • Water 0.034 sq mi (0.088 km2)  1.47%
Area rank 388th of 566 in state
43rd of 70 in county[3]
Elevation[7] 30 ft (9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 16,341
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 16,504
 • Rank 153rd of 566 in state
19th of 70 in county[12]
 • Density 7,186.0/sq mi (2,774.5/km2)
 • Density rank 58th of 566 in state
18th of 70 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07646[13][14]
Area code(s) 201[15]
FIPS code 3400351660[16][3][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885320[18][3]
Website www.newmilfordboro.com

New Milford is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 16,341,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 59 (-0.4%) from the 16,400 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 410 (+2.6%) from the 15,990 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

New Milford was incorporated as a borough on March 11, 1922, from what remained of Palisades Township,[20] based on the results of a referendum held on April 18, 1922.[21] With the creation of New Milford, Palisades Township (which had been created in 1871) was dissolved.[22] The borough is believed to have been named for Milford, Pennsylvania.[23]

Geography[edit]

New Milford is located at 40°56′03″N 74°01′10″W / 40.934161°N 74.019453°W / 40.934161; -74.019453 (40.934161,-74.019453). According to the United States Census Bureau, New Milford had a total area of 2.308 square miles (5.978 km2), of which, 2.274 square miles (5.890 km2) of it was land and 0.034 square miles (0.088 km2) of it (1.47%) was water.[3][2]

During Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011, the Hackensack River crested at 11.84 feet (3.61 m), the second-highest recorded height and almost 6 feet (1.8 m) above flood stage. The record height at the New Milford flood gauge is 12.36 feet (3.77 m) set during a storm on April 16, 2007, and the previous second-highest level of 11.45 feet (3.49 m) had been set during Hurricane Floyd on September 16, 1999.[24]

Demographic[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 860
1910 1,141 32.7%
1920 3,833 235.9%
1930 2,556 −33.3%
1940 3,215 25.8%
1950 6,006 86.8%
1960 18,810 213.2%
1970 19,149 1.8%
1980 16,876 −11.9%
1990 15,990 −5.3%
2000 16,400 2.6%
2010 16,341 −0.4%
Est. 2012 16,504 [11] 1.0%
Population sources: 1900-1910[25]
1910-1930[26] 1900-2010[27][28][29]
2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 16,341 people, 6,141 households, and 4,207 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,186.0 per square mile (2,774.5 /km2). There were 6,362 housing units at an average density of 2,797.7 per square mile (1,080.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 70.51% (11,522) White, 3.72% (608) Black or African American, 0.12% (20) Native American, 19.39% (3,169) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 3.59% (586) from other races, and 2.64% (432) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 13.63% (2,227) of the population.[8]

There were 6,141 households, of which 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.24.[8]

In the borough, 20.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.6 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.0 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $75,075 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,822) and the median family income was $96,885 (+/- $5,032). Males had a median income of $62,817 (+/- $4,265) versus $51,630 (+/- $2,640) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,491 (+/- $2,896). About 2.5% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.3% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Same-sex couples headed 37 households in 2010, more than double the 16 counted in 2000.[33]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 16,400 people, 6,346 households, and 4,277 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,099.0 people per square mile (2,741.2/km2). There were 6,437 housing units at an average density of 2,786.4 per square mile (1,075.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.59% White, 2.62% African American, 0.12% Native American, 14.76% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.86% from other races, and 2.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.09% of the population.[30][31]

There were 6,346 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 28.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.18.[30][31]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.4% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the borough was $59,118, and the median income for a family was $77,216. Males had a median income of $46,463 versus $36,987 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,064. About 1.7% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

New Milford is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in November.[6][34] The Borough form of government used by New Milford, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[35]

As of 2013, the Mayor of New Milford is Republican Ann Subrizi, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. The members of the Borough Council are Council President Randi Duffie (D, 2014), Austin Ashley (D, 2015), Dominic Colucci (R, 2013), Michael Putrino (D, 2015), Hedy Grant (D, 2014), Diego Robalino (R, 2013).[34][36][37][38][39][40]

Democrats took control of the council in the November 2012 general election, as incumbent Austin Ashley won reelection while running mate and former council member Michael Putrino was elected again after having served two previous terms of office. Incumbent Republican Howard Berner and running mate Peter Rebsch, a former council member, fell short.[41]

Celeste Scavetta had been appointed by the Borough Council on January 11, 2011, to fill the vacant seat of Ann Subrizi that expired at the end of 2011 that was created when Subrizi was elected as mayor.[42] Peter Rebsch had been appointed in June 2011 to fill the vacant seat of Council President Keith Bachmann, who had resigned from office; Rebsch will served until November 2011, when voters chose a candidate to fill the balance of Bachmann's term that expires in 2012.[43]

In the November 2011 general election, Democratic incumbent Randi Duffie and newcomers Austin Ashley and Hedy Grant won seats on the Council, knocking off incumbent Republicans Peter Rebsch and Celeste Scavetta. After counting absentee ballots, Duffie and Grant won the two three-year council seats, edging Republican Scavetta by 10 votes, and will start their terms in January 2012. Ashley defeated Darren Drake by 39 votes for the remaining year on the unexpired term of Ann Subrizzi that had been filled on an interim basis by Peter Rebsch, and took office after the election.[44]

The results of the election held November 2, 2010, were a Republican sweep. Republican challenger Ann Subrizi (2,433 votes) ousted 14-year Democratic incumbent, Frank DeBari (2,120). The Republican challengers for Council defeated both incumbents, with Dominic Colucci (2,328 votes) and Diego Robalino (2,285) unseating Democrats Michael J. Putrino (2,210) and Arthur E. Zeilner (2,115). These result gave the Republicans a 4-1 margin, with Ann Subrizi's seat on the Council left vacant.[45]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

New Milford is located in the 5th Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district.[9][47][48] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, New Milford had been in the 39th state legislative district.[49] Prior to the 2010 Census, New Milford had been split between the 5th congressional District and the 9th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[49]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[51][52] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[53][54]

The 38th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert M. Gordon (D, Fair Lawn) and in the General Assembly by Tim Eustace (D, Maywood) and Joseph Lagana (D, Paramus).[55][56] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[57] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[58]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[59] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[60] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[61] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[62] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[63] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[64] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[65] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[66] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[67] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[68][69] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[70] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[71] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[72][73][59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 9,355 registered voters in New Milford, of which 2,787 (29.8% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,636 (17.5% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 4,928 (52.7% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[74] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 57.2% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 72.3% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[74][75]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 3,780 votes here (54.5% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 3,036 votes (43.8% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 61 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 6,932 ballots cast by the borough's 9,892 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.1% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[76][77] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 4,152 votes here (53.6% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 3,448 votes (44.5% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 68 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 7,746 ballots cast by the borough's 9,881 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.4% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[78][79] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 3,838 votes here (51.1% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 3,574 votes (47.6% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 50 votes (0.7% vs. 0.7%), among the 7,506 ballots cast by the borough's 9,596 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.2% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[80]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 2,306 ballots cast (47.7% vs. 48.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 2,223 votes (45.9% vs. 45.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 227 votes (4.7% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 31 votes (0.6% vs. 0.5%), among the 4,838 ballots cast by the borough's 9,615 registered voters, yielding a 50.3% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[81]

Education[edit]

The New Milford School District serves students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[82]) are Berkley Street School[83] (grades K-5; 417 students), Bertram F. Gibbs Elementary School[84] (PreK-5; 523), David E. Owens Middle School[85] (6-8; 504) and New Milford High School[86] (9-12; 657).[87]

Starting as of the 2011-12 school year, the high school incorporates an academies program to the school, similar to the structure at the Bergen Academies. There are now sub-academies within the high school such as the school of sciences and the school of history.[88]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[89][90]

The Hovnanian School, founded in 1976 and dedicated to help foster knowledge of Armenian culture and the Armenian language, serves students in preschool through eighth grade.[91]

New Milford is also the home of The Art Center of Northern New Jersey, a fine arts school and gallery offering classes for adults and children that was originally established in 1957 in Englewood, New Jersey.[92]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 47.41 miles (76.30 km) of roadways, of which 42.45 miles (68.32 km) are maintained by the municipality and 4.96 miles (7.98 km) by Bergen County.[93]

Main roads in New Milford include River Road, Madison Avenue, Milford Avenue, and Boulevard.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus route 167 offers service between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, with local service offered on the 753, 756, 762, and 772 bus routes through New Milford.[94] Coach USA's Rockland Coaches offers service on the 11C and 25 routes to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station and on the 21T to the Port Authority Bus Terminal.[95][96]

Commuter rail service is provided by New Jersey Transit's Pascack Valley Line, with service at River Edge and New Bridge Landing stations, which are just outside New Milford, across the Hackensack River in River Edge.[97] The Pascack Valley Line offers two-way weekday and weekend service to and from Hoboken Terminal, and connecting service to Penn Station via Secaucus Junction.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with New Milford include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Home Page, Borough of New Milford. Accessed January 23, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
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  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of New Milford. Accessed August 13, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 165.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of New Milford, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for New Milford borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 10, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for New Milford borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 10, 2013.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for New Milford, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 29, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for New Milford, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
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  20. ^ Bergen County New Jersey Municipalities, Dutch Door Genealogy. Accessed September 13, 2006.
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  24. ^ Hackensack River flood gauge at New Milford, National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service. Accessed August 29, 2011.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed July 17, 2012. Listed as Palisades Township.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed December 20, 2011.
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  28. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed August 13, 2013.
  29. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed October 25, 2013. Data for 1900-1920, prior to the borough's formation, is for Palisades Township.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Midland Park borough, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2011.
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  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for New Milford borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  33. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed July 26, 2013.
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  41. ^ Devencentis, Philip. "Democrats win council race in New Milford", Twin-Boro news, November 15, 2012. Accessed August 13, 2013. "The political makeup of the council will change, however, with the election of former Councilman Michael Putrino, a Democrat.... Putrino’s running mate, Councilman Austin Ashley, received 2,956 votes to earn his first full term.... Republican council president Howard Berner and his running mate, Peter Rebsch, trailed in last week’s election with 2,583 votes and 2,534 votes, respectively."
  42. ^ Hayes, Melissa. "New Milford council pegs Celeste Scavetta for open seat", The Record (Bergen County) Bergen Beat, January 11, 2011. Accessed August 29, 2011. "The New Milford Borough Council has appointed Celeste Scavetta to serve the remainder of Mayor Ann Subrizi’s council term."
  43. ^ Griffiths, Erin Patricia. "Peter Rebsch appointed to the New Milford Council", Twin-Boro News, June 14, 2011. Accessed August 29, 2011. "Peter Rebsch, New Milford resident and Republican council candidate for the November election, was appointed last night to fill the vacancy on the borough's governing body. He was appointed in a 4-1 vote, with Councilwoman Randi Duffie dissenting. Rebsch was one of three candidates put forth by the New Milford Republican Club for the open borough seat, which was left vacant with the resignation of Council President Keith Bachmann."
  44. ^ Piccirillo, Ann. "Absentee Ballots Put New Milford Democrats On Top: A nail-biting race that came down to absentee ballots", NewMilfordPatch, November 9, 2011. "Until all 185 absentee ballots were counted, the race in New Milford was too close to call, but when all the votes were tallied, the Democratic slate swept to victory, changing the face of New Milford's council.Democratic incumbent Randi Duffie and her running mates, Hedy Grant and Austin Ashley, beat out Republican incumbents Celeste Scavetta, Peter Rebsch and their running mate, Darren Drake."
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  65. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  66. ^ Steve Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  67. ^ James, J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  68. ^ Tracy Silna Zur, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  69. ^ Freeholder Board, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
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  72. ^ Michael R. Dressler, Bergen County Surrogate's Court. Accessed July 15, 2014.
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  74. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Bergen, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 11, 2013.
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  80. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  81. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 11, 2013.
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