810s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 810s decade ran from January 1, 810, to December 31, 819.

Events[edit]

810

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

811[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
  • Byzantine–Bulgarian War: Emperor Nikephoros I organises a new campaign against the Bulgarian Empire, gathering a expeditionary force (around 80,000 men) from all parts of the empire. He is accompanied by high-ranking officials and aristocrats, including his son Stauracius and brother-in-law Michael I Rangabe[4] (both emperors later, for a while). Krum, ruler (khan) of Bulgaria, sends envoys to sue for peace. Nikephoros refuses to accept the terms and marches through the Balkan passes towards Pliska, the Bulgarian capital.
  • July 23 – Nikephoros I reaches Pliska, and destroys a Bulgarian army of 12,000 elite soldiers who guard the stronghold. Another hastily assembled relief force of 50,000 soldiers has a similar fate.[5] The Byzantines capture the defenseless capital. Nikephoros plunders the city and captures Krum's treasury.[6] He burns the countryside, slaughters sheep and pigs, as he pursues the retreating Bulgars south-west towards Serdica (modern-day Sofia).[7]
  • July 26Battle of Vărbitsa Pass: Nikephoros I is trapped (probably in the Vărbitsa Pass) and defeated by the Bulgars, who use the tactics of ambush and surprise night attacks to immobilize the Byzantine forces. Nikephoros himself is killed; Krum has the emperor's head carried back in triumph on a pole, where it is cleaned out, lined with silver and made into a jeweled skull cup, which he allows his Slavic princes (archons) to drink from with him.[8]
  • Stauracius is installed as emperor at Adrianople (first time a Byzantine emperor is crowned outside Constantinople). Because of a sword wound near his neck (during the Battle of Pliska), Stauracius is paralyzed. The imperial court is split between the noble factions of his wife Theophano and his sister Prokopia.[9]
  • October 2 – Michael I is declared emperor of the Byzantine Empire; Stauracius is forced by senior officials to retire to a monastery.[10]
Europe[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]


812[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]
China[edit]


813[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


814[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Japan[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


815[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


816[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


817[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
North Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


818[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • Theodulf, bishop of Orléans, is deposed and imprisoned, after becoming involved in a conspiracy with Bernard of Italy.


819[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Notker the Stammerer, De Carolo Magno, Book II, Chapter 13.
  2. ^ Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire médiévale de la Péninsule ibérique (in French). Paris: Seuil. pp. 443, 86. ISBN 2-02-012935-3. 
  3. ^ Coe 1967, 1988, p. 76.
  4. ^ Anonymus Vaticanus, p. 148.
  5. ^ Anonymus Vaticanus, pp. 148-149.
  6. ^ Anastasius Bibliothecarius. Chronographia tripertita, p. 329.
  7. ^ Anonymus Vaticanus, p. 150.
  8. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 97. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  9. ^ Treadgold, p. 429; Bury, p. 17.
  10. ^ Treadgold, p. 429; Finlay, p. 128.
  11. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 97-98. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  12. ^ Benvenuti, Gino (1985). Le Repubbliche Marinare. Amalfi, Pisa, Genova e Venezia. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. p. 13. ISBN 88-8289-529-7. 
  13. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 98–99.
  14. ^ Runciman, pp. 64–65.
  15. ^ Fishbein (1992), pp. 197–202.
  16. ^ Nadeau, Jean-Benoît and Barlow, Julie, The Story of French (Alfred A. Knopf 2006), p. 25.
  17. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 99. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  18. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 106. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  19. ^ Swanton, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, pp. 58–59.
  20. ^ Kazhdan, Alexander, ed. (1991), Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium. Oxford University Press, pp. 513–514. ISBN 978-0-19-504652-6.
  21. ^ Salvador Miranda (1998). The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church: Pope Stefano IV (815–817).
  22. ^ Sánchez Albornoz, Claudio; Claudio Sánchez Albornoz. Problems del Reino de Navarra del siglo IX. p. 16. 
  23. ^ Islam and Europe Timeline (355–1291 AD).
  24. ^ Wickham, p. 154. In 818 according to the Annales Beneventani.
  25. ^ Dr. Kathryn Tsai. A Timeline of Eastern Church History. Divine Ascent Press, Point Reyes Station, CA, 2004, p. 153.
  26. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 107. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  27. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 40. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9. 
  28. ^ Rogers, Barbara, Bernhard W. Scholz, and Nithardus. Carolingian Chronicles, Royal Frankish Annals Nithard's Histories. Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan, 1972. Print.