Asymmetric cut

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An asymmetric haircut

An asymmetric cut is a haircut in which the hair is cut in such a way that the hair does not have left-right symmetry and one side is cut or appears to be longer than the other.[1] It is a versatile hairstyle with many subvariations.[1][2] Usually it is a combination of two separate styles, one for each side.[1] An extreme variation is the "side shave", in which one side of the head is totally or partially shaved close.[3]

Examples[edit]

Celebrities who have sported asymmetric hairstyles include Justin Bieber,[4][5] January Jones,[6] Milla Jovovich,[7] Kim Kardashian,[8] Cyndi Lauper,[1] Rihanna,[3] Phil Oakey,[9] and Davey Havok[10] of AFI. Reality television star Kate Gosselin became well known for her asymmetrical cut,[5][11] which she has since changed.[11]

Aesthetics[edit]

Asymmetric cuts can confer an aesthetic property known to professional hairdressers and cosmetologists as "asymmetrical balance" when they balance asymmetrical facial features.[12]:237–238,251[13]:158,160 Hairdressers advise the use of an asymmetric cut for clients with asymmetrical features, such as a crooked nose, because symmetrical hairstyles draw attention to the facial asymmetries.[1][12]:245 Experts on personal appearance management in business offer the same advice.[14]:99 The asymmetry of the hairstyle should be opposite to that of the facial feature.[15] Asymmetrical styles that show the ears can make the face look slimmer, and hence are advised for clients with round faces or wide-set eyes.[12]:427[13]:156 If the client wears eyeglasses, an asymmetric cut can distract attention from them.[13]:156 Asymmetric cuts are often more "trendy" than symmetrical hairstyles.[12]:237

Psychology[edit]

Psychological experiments have shown that hairstyle asymmetries are helpful, although not necessary, in determining whether or not an image of a familiar face has been mirror-reversed.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Stacy (n.d.). "Asymmetric hairstyles". Hairstyle Advice. Hairfinder. Archived from the original on 2017-06-16. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  2. ^ Shellie (n.d.). "26 cool asymmetrical bob hairstyles". Popular Hairstyles. Styles Weekly. Archived from the original on 2017-06-10. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  3. ^ a b Cauterucci, Christina (September 24, 2015). "The side shave, R.I.P. (ca. 1989–2015): how a haircut-as-political-statement turned into just another worn-out trend". What Women Really Think. Slate. Archived from the original on 2017-02-11. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  4. ^ "Stars who may have inspired Justin Bieber's new hairstyle". Page Six. Photo credit: Mark Ralston / AFP / Getty Images. August 31, 2015. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  5. ^ a b Romeyn, Kathryn (August 30, 2015). "Justin Bieber channels Kate Gosselin at the VMAs". Pret-a-Reporter. Hollywood Reporter. Joint publication with Billboard. Photo credit: AP Images. Archived from the original on 2017-09-21. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  6. ^ Gardner, Tara (March 7, 2013). "January Jones works asymmetric bob hairstyle!". News. InStyle UK. Archived from the original on 2017-09-21. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  7. ^ "Milla Jovovich short asymmetric hairstyle". Female Celebrities. Hairstyles Weekly. Photo credit: Getty Images. n.d. Archived from the original on 2015-10-04. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  8. ^ Panych, Sophia (August 2, 2016). "Kim Kardashian brings back the asymmetric cut". Celebrity. Allure. Archived from the original on 2016-11-10. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  9. ^ Lester, Paul (July 21, 2001). "Human remains: two decades after their synthpop assault on the charts, the Human League are back". Culture. Guardian. Archived from the original on 2017-06-24. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  10. ^ Raymer, Miles (July 6, 2006). "The treatment: Friday 7". Essay. Chicago Reader. Archived from the original on 2017-09-21. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  11. ^ a b Talarico, Brittany (October 28, 2014). "Now that Kate Gosselin has super-long hair here are three styles she should try". Style. People. Photo credit: Getty Images. Archived from the original on 2017-09-21. Retrieved 2017-09-21. 
  12. ^ a b c d Alpert, Arlene; Altenburg, Margrit; Bailey, Diane; Barnes, Letha; Barnes, Lisha; Beatty, Debbie; Brunetti, Mary; Crawford, Jane; Evirs, Aly; Frangie, Catherine M.; Halal, John; Hennessey, Colleen; Janssen, Mary Beth; Love, Toni; Mackinder, Vivienne; Nash, Carey; Roche, Ruth; Sammarco, Teresa; Sansom, Sue; Schultes, Sue (2004). Milady's Standard: Cosmetology (rev. ed.). Clifton Park, New York, USA: Milady. ISBN 1-56253-879-9. 
  13. ^ a b c Bendell, David; Tehan, Elizabeth (2009). A head start to hairdressing. Frenchs Forest, New South Wales, Australia: Pearson Education Australia. ISBN 978-1-4425-0055-6. 
  14. ^ Vega, Lizandra (2010). The image of success: make a great impression and land the job you want. New York: Amacom. ISBN 978-0-8144-1454-5. 
  15. ^ Roche, Dennis; Roche, Jamie (2017). The Zen of beauty: a guide to your magnificence. Bloomington, Indiana, USA: Balboa Press. ISBN 978-1-5043-7010-3. 
  16. ^ Brédart, Serge (July 2003). "Recognising the usual orientation of one's own face: the role of asymmetrically located details". Perception. 32 (7): 805–811. doi:10.1068/p3354. PMID 12974566.  (author manuscript)