Lincoln County, Tennessee

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Lincoln County
Lincoln County Courthouse in Fayetteville
Lincoln County Courthouse in Fayetteville
Official seal of Lincoln County
Map of Tennessee highlighting Lincoln County
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°08′N 86°35′W / 35.14°N 86.59°W / 35.14; -86.59
Country United States
State Tennessee
Founded1809
Named forBenjamin Lincoln[1]
SeatFayetteville
Largest cityFayetteville
Area
 • Total571 sq mi (1,480 km2)
 • Land570 sq mi (1,500 km2)
 • Water0.4 sq mi (1 km2)  0.07%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total35,319 Increase
 • Density58/sq mi (22/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district4th
Websitewww.lincolncountytn.gov

Lincoln County is a county located in the south central part of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 35,319.[2] Its county seat and largest city is Fayetteville.[3] The county is named for Major General Benjamin Lincoln, an officer in the American Revolutionary War.[4]

History[edit]

Lincoln County was created in 1809 from parts of Bedford County. The land occupied by the county was part of a land cession obtained from the Cherokee and Chickasaw in 1806.[1]

The Lincoln County Process, used in the distillation of Tennessee whiskey, is named for this county, as the Jack Daniel Distillery was originally located there. However, a subsequent redrawing of county lines resulted in the establishment of adjacent Moore County, which includes the location of the distillery. Another distillery opened in Lincoln County in 1997 – the Benjamin Pritchard's Distillery. However, it does not use the Lincoln County Process for making its Tennessee whiskey. When a law was established in 2013 to require the Lincoln County Process to be used for making all Tennessee whiskey, the Benjamin Pritchard's Distillery was exempted by a grandfather clause. As a result, no current Lincoln County business uses its namesake process.

On March 5, 2017, a poultry farm that distributes products to Tyson Foods was confirmed to have a reported a case of Influenza A virus subtype H7N9 detected in birds resulting in the slaughter of 74,000 chickens.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 571 square miles (1,480 km2), of which 570 square miles (1,500 km2) are land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) (0.07%) are water.[6]

Adjacent counties[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

  • Flintville Hatchery Wildlife Management Area

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18106,104
182014,761141.8%
183022,07549.5%
184021,493−2.6%
185023,4929.3%
186022,828−2.8%
187028,05022.9%
188026,960−3.9%
189027,3821.6%
190026,304−3.9%
191025,908−1.5%
192025,786−0.5%
193025,422−1.4%
194027,2147.0%
195025,624−5.8%
196023,829−7.0%
197024,3182.1%
198026,4838.9%
199028,1576.3%
200031,34011.3%
201033,3616.4%
202035,3195.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2014[2]
Age pyramid Lincoln County[12]

2020 census[edit]

Lincoln County racial composition[13]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 29,803 84.38%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 2,198 6.22%
Native American 116 0.33%
Asian 178 0.5%
Pacific Islander 16 0.05%
Other/Mixed 1,740 4.93%
Hispanic or Latino 1,268 3.59%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 35,319 people, 13,548 households, and 9,264 families residing in the county.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 census,[14] there were 33,361 people, 15,241 households, and 4,239 families residing in the county. The population density was 55 people per square mile (21/km2). There were 13,999 housing units at an average density of 24 per square mile (9/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 89.45% White, 6.80% Black or African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.10% from other races, and 1.78% from two or more races. 2.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 15,241 households, out of which 28% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58% were married couples living together, 11% had a female head of household with no husband present, and 27% were non-families. 25% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24% under the age of 18, 8% from 18 to 24, 28% from 25 to 44, 25% from 45 to 64, and 16% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.8 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,434, and the median income for a family was $41,454. Males had a median income of $30,917 versus $21,722 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,837. About 10% of families and 14% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17% of those under age 18 and 20% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Prior to 1968, Lincoln County was a Democratic Party stronghold in presidential elections similar to most other counties in the Solid South. The county backed segregationist George Wallace in 1968, but despite voting Republican for the first time in Richard Nixon’s 49-state 1972 landslide, remained Democratic-leaning up to 1992. Since then, it has become a Republican Party stronghold, with its candidates winning the county by increasing margins with each succeeding presidential election starting with 1996.

United States presidential election results for Lincoln County, Tennessee[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 12,281 78.68% 2,919 18.70% 408 2.61%
2016 10,398 77.90% 2,554 19.13% 396 2.97%
2012 9,803 73.88% 3,290 24.80% 175 1.32%
2008 9,231 70.30% 3,695 28.14% 204 1.55%
2004 7,829 62.85% 4,546 36.49% 82 0.66%
2000 5,435 50.99% 5,060 47.47% 164 1.54%
1996 4,551 46.69% 4,361 44.74% 835 8.57%
1992 3,814 37.02% 5,063 49.15% 1,425 13.83%
1988 4,288 53.49% 3,672 45.80% 57 0.71%
1984 3,982 49.08% 4,103 50.57% 29 0.36%
1980 2,856 33.96% 5,387 64.06% 166 1.97%
1976 1,724 22.93% 5,732 76.24% 62 0.82%
1972 3,266 61.84% 1,867 35.35% 148 2.80%
1968 1,167 16.14% 1,848 25.56% 4,214 58.29%
1964 1,728 26.23% 4,861 73.77% 0 0.00%
1960 1,428 22.53% 4,862 76.71% 48 0.76%
1956 1,207 21.21% 4,434 77.90% 51 0.90%
1952 1,654 26.78% 4,510 73.01% 13 0.21%
1948 361 8.83% 2,969 72.63% 758 18.54%
1944 573 13.28% 3,735 86.54% 8 0.19%
1940 521 12.07% 3,781 87.62% 13 0.30%
1936 430 11.06% 3,451 88.76% 7 0.18%
1932 288 8.40% 3,095 90.26% 46 1.34%
1928 743 23.76% 2,377 76.02% 7 0.22%
1924 357 13.01% 2,356 85.86% 31 1.13%
1920 1,091 30.65% 2,463 69.19% 6 0.17%
1916 552 16.44% 2,791 83.14% 14 0.42%
1912 672 19.59% 2,651 77.27% 108 3.15%

The governing body of Lincoln County is the Lincoln County Commission, which is divided into eight districts and 24 commissioners, three from each district. The body is chaired by the County Mayor. The government center of Lincoln County is the Lincoln County Courthouse in Fayetteville.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Town[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Education[edit]

Education in Lincoln County is mostly led by the Lincoln County Department of Education (LCDOE).

Schools in the Lincoln County District[edit]

High schools (9 - 12)[edit]

Elementary schools/Middle schools (K - 8)[edit]

  • Highland Rim Elementary/Middle School
  • South Lincoln Elementary/Middle School
  • Flintville Elementary/Middle School
  • Unity Elementary/Middle School
  • Blanche Elementary/Middle School

Schools in the Fayetteville City District[edit]

  • Ralph Askins School (Pre-K - 4)
  • Fayetteville Middle School (5 - 8)
  • Fayetteville High School (9 - 12)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jack Towry and June Towry, "Lincoln County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 21 October 2013.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 187.
  5. ^ Flynn, Dan (March 8, 2017). "74,000 Tyson-owned birds depopulated in Lincoln County, Tennessee Avian Flu outbreak". Food Safety News.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 20, 2019.
  12. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  13. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 24, 2021.
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 11, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°08′N 86°35′W / 35.14°N 86.59°W / 35.14; -86.59