Cheatham County, Tennessee

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Cheatham County
Cheatham County Courthouse in Ashland City
Official seal of Cheatham County
Map of Tennessee highlighting Cheatham County
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°16′N 87°05′W / 36.27°N 87.08°W / 36.27; -87.08
Country United States
State Tennessee
FoundedFebruary 28, 1856
Named forEdward Saunders Cheatham[1] or Benjamin F. Cheatham[2]
SeatAshland City
Largest townAshland City
Area
 • Total307 sq mi (800 km2)
 • Land302 sq mi (780 km2)
 • Water4.6 sq mi (12 km2)  1.5%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2020[3])
41,072 Increase
 • Density133/sq mi (51/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional districts5th, 6th
Websitewww.cheathamcountytn.gov

Cheatham County (/ˈtʃiˌtəm/ CHEE-təm) is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 39,105.[4] Its county seat is Ashland City.[5] Cheatham County is part of the Nashville-DavidsonMurfreesboroFranklin, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is located in Middle Tennessee.

History[edit]

Cheatham County was created by an Act of the Tennessee General Assembly in 1856, from lands formerly of Davidson, Dickson, Montgomery, and Robertson counties. Cheatham County was named for Edward Saunders Cheatham, a state legislator.[1]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 307 square miles (800 km2), of which 302 square miles (780 km2) is land and 4.6 square miles (12 km2) (1.5%) is water.[6]

The county is bisected from northwest to southeast by the Cumberland River, with Ashland City located on its northern bank. The southern portion of the county is bisected from southeast to northwest by the Harpeth River, which meanders through generally hilly country, and along whose course are located the communities of Kingston Springs, largely to the north of Interstate 40 (I-40), and Pegram, along U.S. Route 70 (US 70). The western border of the central portion of the county is defined by the course of the Harpeth. The hills east of the Harpeth and south of the Cumberland are partly set aside by the state as the Cheatham State Wildlife Management Area. North of Ashland City the hills subside into more level highlands, where the community of Pleasant View is located just south of I-24, which generally delineates the northern border of the county.

Adjacent counties[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18607,258
18706,678−8.0%
18807,95619.1%
18908,84511.2%
190010,11214.3%
191010,5404.2%
192010,039−4.8%
19309,025−10.1%
19409,92810.0%
19509,167−7.7%
19609,4282.8%
197013,19940.0%
198021,61663.8%
199027,14025.6%
200035,91232.3%
201039,1058.9%
202041,0725.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2014[4]
Age pyramid Cheatham County[11]

2020 census[edit]

Cheatham County racial composition[12]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 36,299 88.38%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 815 1.98%
Native American 92 0.22%
Asian 184 0.45%
Pacific Islander 25 0.06%
Other/Mixed 1,818 4.43%
Hispanic or Latino 1,839 4.48%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 41,072 people, 15,089 households, and 11,022 families residing in the county.

2000 census[edit]

At the 2000 census there were 35,912 people, 12,878 households, and 10,160 families in the county. The population density was 119 people per square mile (46/km2). There were 13,508 housing units at an average density of 45 per square mile (17/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.86% White, 1.48% Black or African American, 0.38% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. 1.22%.[13] were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

In 2005 The racial makeup of the county was 94.8% non-Hispanic whites, 2.1% African-Americans and 1.7% Latinos. In 2000 Of the 12,878 households 39.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.90% were married couples living together, 9.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.10% were non-families. 16.90% of households were one person and 5.30% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.08.

The age distribution was 27.70% under the age of 18, 7.30% from 18 to 24, 33.50% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 8.60% 65 or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.40 males.

The median household income was $45,836 and the median family income was $49,143. Males had a median income of $34,476 versus $25,191 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,882. About 5.30% of families and 7.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.60% of those under age 18 and 9.40% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Cheatham County is a Republican stronghold: the last Democrat to carry this county was Bill Clinton in 1996. The county is politically a typical “Solid South” rural county whose support for secession made it rock-ribbed Democratic until the middle 1960s when hostility towards civil rights for blacks drove it to George Wallace in 1968 and Richard Nixon in 1972, before turning to more centrist Democrats until the 1990s.

United States presidential election results for Cheatham County, Tennessee[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 14,438 71.26% 5,514 27.22% 308 1.52%
2016 11,297 70.94% 3,878 24.35% 749 4.70%
2012 10,268 67.63% 4,659 30.69% 255 1.68%
2008 10,702 65.14% 5,498 33.47% 228 1.39%
2004 9,676 61.64% 5,918 37.70% 103 0.66%
2000 6,356 50.38% 6,062 48.05% 198 1.57%
1996 4,283 42.98% 4,883 49.01% 798 8.01%
1992 3,496 35.72% 4,817 49.21% 1,475 15.07%
1988 4,132 56.99% 3,067 42.30% 51 0.70%
1984 4,109 57.32% 3,007 41.94% 53 0.74%
1980 2,296 37.03% 3,771 60.81% 134 2.16%
1976 1,376 24.29% 4,225 74.59% 63 1.11%
1972 2,235 60.10% 1,321 35.52% 163 4.38%
1968 669 16.96% 778 19.73% 2,497 63.31%
1964 803 22.60% 2,750 77.40% 0 0.00%
1960 683 26.20% 1,883 72.23% 41 1.57%
1956 498 17.72% 2,297 81.71% 16 0.57%
1952 536 19.31% 2,222 80.04% 18 0.65%
1948 193 6.26% 2,731 88.58% 159 5.16%
1944 216 13.37% 1,398 86.51% 2 0.12%
1940 331 14.61% 1,932 85.26% 3 0.13%
1936 183 11.86% 1,352 87.62% 8 0.52%
1932 180 11.52% 1,370 87.71% 12 0.77%
1928 488 34.78% 913 65.07% 2 0.14%
1924 181 16.98% 868 81.43% 17 1.59%
1920 569 31.77% 1,219 68.06% 3 0.17%
1916 439 28.10% 1,117 71.51% 6 0.38%
1912 317 20.33% 1,096 70.30% 146 9.36%
1908 526 30.33% 1,206 69.55% 2 0.12%
1904 420 28.99% 1,015 70.05% 14 0.97%
1900 440 26.55% 1,190 71.82% 27 1.63%
1896 496 27.99% 1,237 69.81% 39 2.20%
1892 242 15.64% 732 47.32% 573 37.04%
1888 305 21.66% 1,063 75.50% 40 2.84%
1884 335 25.89% 959 74.11% 0 0.00%
1880 291 24.85% 794 67.81% 86 7.34%
1876 267 22.90% 899 77.10% 0 0.00%
1872 284 28.80% 702 71.20% 0 0.00%
1868 73 70.87% 30 29.13% 0 0.00%
1856 0 0.00% 465 52.36% 423 47.64%


Notable people[edit]

Upchurch (musician)

Hickok45

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b James B. Hallums, "Cheatham County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 23 June 2013.
  2. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 77.
  3. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 2, 2018.
  4. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved November 29, 2013.
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  11. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  12. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 26, 2021.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved February 21, 2021.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°16′N 87°05′W / 36.27°N 87.08°W / 36.27; -87.08