Estill County, Kentucky

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Estill County, Kentucky
Estill County, Kentucky courthouse.jpg
Estill County courthouse in Irvine, Kentucky
Map of Kentucky highlighting Estill County
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Founded 1808
Named for James Estill
Seat Irvine
Largest city Irvine
Area
 • Total 255.70 sq mi (662 km2)
 • Land 253.93 sq mi (658 km2)
 • Water 1.76 sq mi (5 km2), 0.69%
Population
 • (2010) 14,672
 • Density 57.8/sq mi (22/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.estillcountyky.net

Estill County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,672.[1] Its county seat is Irvine, Kentucky[2] The county was formed in 1808 and named for Captain James Estill, a Kentucky militia officer who was killed in the Battle of Little Mountain during the American Revolutionary War.[3] It is a prohibition or dry county.

In 2008, Estill County welcomed the Estill County Bicentennial that included a yearlong celebration of themed months showcasing 200 years of history, importance and the viability of Estill County and its Twin Cities of Irvine and Ravenna. Both cities sit along the Kentucky River. Ravenna is home to CSX Transportation and the historic Fitchburg & Cottage Furnaces and conducted the Ravenna Railroad Festival in August 2008. Irvine is home to the manufacturing headquarters of Carhartt, Inc. and annually hosts the Mountain Mushroom Festival over last weekend of April.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 255.70 square miles (662.3 km2), of which 253.93 square miles (657.7 km2) (or 99.31%) is land and 1.76 square miles (4.6 km2) (or 0.69%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

History[edit]

Estill County was formed in 1808 from land given by Clark and Madison counties. A courthouse built in 1941 replaced a structure dating from the 1860s.[5]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,082
1820 3,507 68.4%
1830 4,618 31.7%
1840 5,535 19.9%
1850 5,985 8.1%
1860 6,886 15.1%
1870 9,198 33.6%
1880 9,860 7.2%
1890 10,836 9.9%
1900 11,669 7.7%
1910 12,273 5.2%
1920 15,569 26.9%
1930 17,079 9.7%
1940 17,978 5.3%
1950 14,677 −18.4%
1960 12,466 −15.1%
1970 12,752 2.3%
1980 14,495 13.7%
1990 14,614 0.8%
2000 15,307 4.7%
2010 14,672 −4.1%
Est. 2012 14,493 −1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
2012 Estimate[7]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 15,307 people, 6,108 households, and 4,434 families residing in the county. The population density was 60 per square mile (23 /km2). There were 6,824 housing units at an average density of 27 per square mile (10 /km2). The racial makeup of the county was 99.07% White, 0.11% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.03% Asian, 0.06% from other races, and 0.49% from two or more races. 0.53% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,108 households out of which 32.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.40% were married couples living together, 12.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.40% were non-families. 24.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.20% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 29.20% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 13.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 93.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $23,318, and the median income for a family was $27,284. Males had a median income of $29,254 versus $18,849 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,285. About 22.50% of families and 26.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.30% of those under age 18 and 21.50% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (1987). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. p. 95. Retrieved 2013-04-28. 
  4. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  5. ^ Hogan, Roseann Reinemuth (1992). Kentucky Ancestry: A Guide to Genealogical and Historical Research. Ancestry Publishing. p. 226. Retrieved 26 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Census.gov. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°41′N 83°58′W / 37.69°N 83.96°W / 37.69; -83.96