Alpha blocker

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Alpha blockers
α-blockers
Drug class
Class identifiers
Use  • hypertension
 • vasoconstriction
 • BPH
ATC code C02CA
Mechanism of action  • Receptor antagonist
 • Inverse agonist
Biological target α-adrenoceptors

Alpha-blockers or α-blockers are pharmacological agents that act as neutral antagonists or inverse agonists of α-adrenergic receptors (α-adrenoceptors).[1]

Classification[edit]

When the term "alpha blocker" is used without further qualification, it sometimes refers to α1-blockers, and sometimes refers to agents that act at both types of receptors.[citation needed]

Examples of non-selective α-adrenergic receptor antagonists include:

Selective α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists include:

Selective α2-adrenergic receptor antagonists include:

The agents carvedilol and labetalol are both α- and β-blockers.

Uses[edit]

α-Blockers are used in the treatment of several conditions, such as Raynaud's disease, hypertension, and scleroderma.[8]

α-Blockers can also be used to treat anxiety and panic disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While most commonly used to treat hypertension (usually in conjunction with diuretics when other treatments are ineffective), they are also often used to treat the symptoms of BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ alpha-Adrenergic Blockers at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)
  2. ^ "Alfuzosin: Biological activity". IUPHAR. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  3. ^ "Doxazosin: Biological activity". IUPHAR. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  4. ^ "Prazosin: Biological activity". IUPHAR. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  5. ^ "Tamsulosin: Biological activity". IUPHAR. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  6. ^ "Terazosin: Biological activity". IUPHAR. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  7. ^ "Silodosin: Biological activity". IUPHAR. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  8. ^ "Alpha blockers - MayoClinic.com".