Doxazosin

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Doxazosin
Doxazosin.svg
Doxazosin ball-and-stick.png
Clinical data
Trade names Cardura, others
AHFS/Drugs.com Monograph
MedlinePlus a693045
Routes of
administration
By mouth (tablets)
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 65%
Protein binding 98%
Metabolism Liver
Elimination half-life 22 hours
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.128.642 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
Formula C23H25N5O5
Molar mass 451.475 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
Chirality Racemic mixture
  (verify)

Doxazosin mesylate, a quinazoline compound sold by Pfizer under the brand names Cardura and Carduran, is an α1-selective alpha blocker used to treat high blood pressure and urinary retention associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

In March 2000, the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) study stopped its arm of the trial looking at alpha blockers, because doxazosin was less effective than a simple diuretic, and because patients on doxazosin had a 25% higher rate of cardiovascular disease and twice the rate of congestive heart failure as patients on diuretics.[1] Pfizer, aware of the results before publication, launched a marketing campaign in early 2000, and sales were largely unaffected, despite the dangers highlighted by the study.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Piller LB, Davis BR, Cutler JA, et al. (2002). "Validation of Heart Failure Events in the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) Participants Assigned to Doxazosin and Chlorthalidone". Curr Control Trials Cardiovasc Med. 3 (1): 10. doi:10.1186/1468-6708-3-10. PMC 149403Freely accessible. PMID 12459039. 
  2. ^ Goldacre, Ben (2012) Bad Pharma How drug companies mislead doctors and harm patients, Fourth Estate, ISBN 0007350740.
  3. ^ Lenzer, J (2003). "Spin doctors soft pedal data on antihypertensives". BMJ: British Medical Journal. 326 (7381): 170. doi:10.1136/bmj.326.7381.170. PMC 1128917Freely accessible. 

External links[edit]