Muqeible

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Muqeible
מֻקֵיבִּלָה
مقيبلة
Muqeible is located in Israel
Muqeible
Muqeible
Coordinates: 32°30′51″N 35°17′41″E / 32.51417°N 35.29472°E / 32.51417; 35.29472Coordinates: 32°30′51″N 35°17′41″E / 32.51417°N 35.29472°E / 32.51417; 35.29472
Grid position 177/213 PAL
District Northern
Council Gilboa
Population (2015)[1] 3,719

Muqeible or Muqeibla (Arabic: مقيبلة‎‎, Hebrew: מֻקֵיבִּלָה‎), meaning "The front place",[2] is an Arab town in Israel's Northern District, situated in the Jezreel Valley between Jenin in the West Bank and the Ta'anakh area. It is a part of the Gilboa Regional Council.In 2015 its population was 3,719. The inhabitants are Muslims and Christians.

History[edit]

Muqeible, named Meqbeleh on the map by Pierre Jacotin from 1799

During the Roman-era, a town called "Muqeibleh" stood at the site. Byzantine-era settlement is attested to archaeologically by a well and pottery workshops from that period near the present village.[3][4]

Ottoman era[edit]

According to a local inhabitant, the villagers moved here from the al-Haram-Sidna Ali-area in the latter part of the Ottoman period.[3] In 1838 Edward Robinson noted Mukeibileh as a “village in the plain, on the direct route from Jenin to Nazareth.”[5] He placed Mukeibileh as being in the District of Jenin, also called "Haritheh esh-Shemaliyeh".[6]

Victor Guérin, who visited in 1870, noted that the village contained 400 inhabitants and had a number of cisterns.[7] In 1882, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described Muqeible as "a mud village in the plain, supplied by cisterns."[8]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the census conducted in 1922 by the British Mandate authorities, Muquibleh had a population of 201; 181 Muslims and 20 Christians,[9] increasing in the 1931 census to 270; 244 Muslims and 26 Christians, in a total of 67 houses.[10]

By 1945 Muqeible had 460 inhabitants, all classified as Muslims.[11] They owned a total of 2,687 dunams of land, while 4,441 dunams were public, a total of 7,128.[12] Of this, 174 dunams were used for plantations or irrigable land, 6,421 for cereals,[13] while 22 dunams were built-up land.[14]

State of Israel[edit]

After the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, Muqeible became been part of the State of Israel.

In 1994, Andrew Petersen, an archaeologist specializing in Islamic architecture, examined the "Hawsh"; a large, square courtyard building, resembling a khan, in the center of the village. The central courtyard of the "Hawsh" measures approximately 30m per side. On the east side there is a small gateway, leading into a tall iwan. Petersen noted that the masonry suggested that it was built either in late Ottoman or early Mandate Period.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of localities, in Alphabetical order" (PDF). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved 16 October 2016. 
  2. ^ Palmer, 1881, p.151
  3. ^ a b c Petersen, 2001, p. 223
  4. ^ Dauphin, 1998, p. 743
  5. ^ Robinson and Smith, 1841, vol 3, p. 161
  6. ^ Robinson and Smith, 1841, vol 3, 2nd app, p. 130, no 8
  7. ^ Guérin, 1874, p. 327. Also cited in Petersen, 2001, p. 223
  8. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 45, also cited in Petersen, 2001, p. 223
  9. ^ Barron, 1923, Table IX, Sub-district of Jenin, p. 29
  10. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 69
  11. ^ Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 16
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 55
  13. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 99
  14. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 149

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]