Neotheropoda

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Neotheropods
Temporal range:
Late TriassicPresent, 220–0 Ma
Coelophysis mount NHM2.jpg
Cast of a Coelophysis bauri skeleton
House sparrow04.jpg
A house sparrow (Passer domesticus)
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Clade: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
Clade: Neotheropoda
Bakker, 1986
Subgroups
Synonyms
  • Avepoda Paul, 2002
  • Eutheropoda Novas, Haro & Canale, 2003

Neotheropoda (meaning "new theropods") is a clade that includes coelophysoids and more advanced theropod dinosaurs, and the only group of theropods who survived the Triassic–Jurassic extinction event. Yet all of the neotheropods became extinct during the early Jurassic period except for Averostra.

Classification[edit]

Neotheropoda was named by Robert T. Bakker in 1986 as a group including the relatively advanced theropod subgroups Ceratosauria and Tetanurae.[1] However, most later researchers have used it to denote a broader group. Neotheropoda was first defined as a clade by Paul Sereno in 1998 as Coelophysis plus modern birds, which includes almost all theropods except the most primitive species.[2]

The following family tree illustrates a synthesis of the relationships of the early theropod groups compiled by Hendrickx et al. in 2015.[3]

Theropoda

Herrerasauridae




Eoraptor




Eodromaeus




Tawa




Daemonosaurus


Neotheropoda

CoelophysoideaCoelophysis Jeff Martz (flipped).jpg




Liliensternus




Zupaysaurus




DilophosauridaeDilophosaurus wetherilli (flipped).PNG


Averostra

CeratosauriaCeratosaurus nasicornis DB.jpg



TetanuraeMeyers grosses Konversations-Lexikon - ein Nachschlagewerk des allgemeinen Wissens (1908) (Antwerpener Breiftaube).jpg












References[edit]

  1. ^ Bakker, R.T. 1986. The Dinosaur Heresies. William Morrow, New York. 481 pp.
  2. ^ Sereno, 1998. A rationale for phylogenetic definitions, with application to the higher-level taxonomy of Dinosauria. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie, Abhandlungen. 210, 41-83.
  3. ^ Hendrickx, C., Hartman, S.A., & Mateus, O. (2015). An Overview of Non- Avian Theropod Discoveries and Classification. PalArch’s Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology, 12(1): 1-73.