Yellow tea

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Yellow tea
Yinzhen.jpg
Type Tea
Country of origin East Asia
Regional names
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese
Korean name
Hangul 황차
Hanja

Yellow tea, called huángchá (黄茶; 黃茶) in Chinese and hwangcha (황차; 黃茶) in Korean,[1][2] is a rare and expensive variety of tea.[3][4] It is produced similarly to green tea, but with an added step of being steamed under a damp cloth after oxidation, giving the leaves a slightly yellow colouring.[5] This process also imparts a mellower and less grassy taste than is found in green teas.[6]

However, it can also describe high-quality teas served at the Imperial court, although this can be applied to any form of imperially-served tea.[citation needed]

Varieties[edit]

China[edit]

Junshan Yinzhen (君山銀針)
from Hunan Province, China is a Silver Needle yellow tea. A Chinese Famous Tea.
Huoshan Huangya (霍山黃牙)
from Mt. Huo, Anhui Province, China.
Meng Ding Huangya (蒙頂黃芽)
from Mt. Meng, Sichuan Province, China.
Da Ye Qing (大叶青)
from Guangdong Province, China. Literally Big Leaf Green.
Huang Tang (黄汤)
from Zhejiang Province, China. Literally Yellow Broth or Yellow Soup.

Korea[edit]

Hwangcha (황차; 黃茶) refers to a tea made of partially oxidized leaves of tea plant. The tea, like oolong from China, is a cross between unoxidized green tea and fully oxidized black tea.[7] The oxidation process for hwangcha is very specific to itself, which enables it to develop the unique flavour.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "黄茶" [huángchá]. LINE Dictionary. Naver Corporation. Retrieved 28 January 2017. 
  2. ^ "황차02(黃茶)" [hwangcha]. Standard Korean Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 28 January 2017. 
  3. ^ Gascoyne, Kevin; Marchand, Francois; Desharnais, Jasmin; Americi, Hugo (2011). Tea: History, Terroirs, Varieties. Firefly Books. p. 58. 
  4. ^ Tripathi, Smita. "Tea for Royalty". Business World. Retrieved 2015-11-12. 
  5. ^ Gascoyne, Kevin; Marchand, Francois; Desharnais, Jasmin; Americi, Hugo (2011). Tea: History, Terroirs, Varieties. Firefly Books. p. 32. 
  6. ^ Qiang Wang; Xin Zhao; Yu Qian; Ru Wang (2013). "In vitro antioxidative activity of yellow tea and its in vivo preventive effect on gastric injury". Experimental Therapeutic Medicine. 6 (2): 423–426. 
  7. ^ Gebely, Tony (7 December 2013). "South Korean Balhyocha & Hwangcha". World of Tea. Retrieved 28 January 2017.