Yuenyeung

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Yuenyeung
Yuanyang (drink).jpg
Iced yuenyeung at a cha chaan teng in Hong Kong (2007)
CourseDrink
Place of originHong Kong[1][2]
Serving temperatureHot or iced
Main ingredientsBrewed coffee, Hong Kong-style milk tea (black tea, evaporated or condensed milk), sugar
VariationsMalaysian Kopi Cham
Yuenyeung
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese鸳鸯
Hanyu PinyinYuānyāng
Cantonese YaleYūnyēung

Yuenyeung (Chinese: 鴛鴦, often transliterated according to the Cantonese language pronunciation Yuenyeung,[3] Yinyeung, or Yinyong[4]), yuanyang (in Mandarin), coffee with tea, also commonly known as Kopi Cham in Malaysia ( from the Hokkien cham, "mix")[5] is a popular beverage in Hong Kong. Made from a mixture of three parts coffee and seven parts Hong Kong-style milk tea, it can be served hot or cold.[6]

It was originally served at dai pai dongs (open air food vendors) and cha chaan tengs (café), but is now available in various types of restaurants.[7][8]

Tea mixed with coffee is also consumed in Ethiopia, where it is known as spreeze.[9]

Etymology[edit]

The name Yuenyeung, which refers to mandarin ducks (Yuanyang), is a symbol of conjugal love in Chinese culture, as the birds usually appear in pairs and the male and female look very different.[10] This same connotation of a "pair" of two unlike items is used to name this drink.[6]

Origin[edit]

Kopi Cham, a drink of coffee plus tea, is usually served hot or iced in Malaysia.

There is dispute over whether other coffee-and-tea mixtures have been independently invented in the Western world, with some claiming it originally was a Dutch serving method. Various individuals have combined coffee with tea, sometimes using the name CoffTea or Tea Espress.

A Hong Kong dai pai dong-style restaurant called Lan Fong Yuen (蘭芳園)[11] claims both Yuenyeung and silk-stocking milk tea were invented in 1952[12] by its owner, a Mr. Lam. Its claim for the former is unverified, but that for the latter is on the record in the official minutes of a LegCo council meeting from 2007,[13] lending it significant plausibility.

The concept was later suggested on the Halfbakery in 2000,[14] and singer Peter André claimed to have invented CoffTea in an interview in 2004.[15] In an interview in 2006, Sandra Blund recommended combining Savarin with chamomile tea in a ratio of 2 to 1 or combining organic Bolivian coffee and White Rose tea in equal parts.[16] Blund claimed to have met a Cistercian nun from Tennessee who began combining the drinks in 1936, about 16 years before Lan Fong Yuen claims to have invented it in Hong Kong.

Adoption[edit]

During the summer of 2010, Starbucks stores in Hong Kong and Macau promoted a frappuccino version of the drink.[17] It was sold as the "Yuen Yeung Frappuccino Blended Cream".[18]

Children Yuenyeung[edit]

There is a caffeine-free variant of Yuenyueng, called Children Yuenyeung (兒童鴛鴦). It is made of Horlicks and Ovaltine, both of which are common in cha chaan tengs in Hong Kong.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Yuenyeung Coffee with Tea". The University of Hong Kong. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  2. ^ Tam, Arthur (12 August 2019). "Coffee or tea? Order a yuen yeung – the off-menu, half-half hybrid served at cafes across Hong Kong". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  3. ^ Richard R. Wertz: Cultural Heritage of China - Food & Drink - Tea - Tea Cultures[unreliable source?]
  4. ^ Sparklette Food & Travel Blog: Hong Kong Kim Gary Restaurant - Toast of Hong Kong. April 17, 2007[unreliable source?]
  5. ^ "Teh & Kopi". July 23, 2007.
  6. ^ a b ""Yuanyang" exhibition showcases the contemporary ceramic art" (Press release). HKSAR Leisure and Cultural Services Department. 2003-02-11. Archived from the original on 2007-02-24. Retrieved 2007-01-12.
  7. ^ "What is Yuen Yeung, Coffee & Milk Tea?". Coffeelnformer. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  8. ^ "Cha Chaan Teng: Our Hong Kong–Style Tea Restaurant". City University of Hong Kong. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  9. ^ Pillai, Gerard (2009). The Fish Eagle's Lament: Travels in Southwest Ethiopia. Troubador Publishing Ltd. p. 65. ISBN 978-1848761308. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  10. ^ "教育部國語辭典:鴛鴦". Ministry of Education, Taiwan. Archived from the original on 2005-05-01. Retrieved 2007-01-14.
  11. ^ "Lan Fong Yuen (Central)". OpenRice Hong Kong.
  12. ^ "Brand Story_LAN Fong Yuen milk tea". www.hklanfongyuen.com.
  13. ^ "Microsoft Word - e_cm1219-translate-e.doc" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-02-06. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ Halfbakery: "CoffTea - a little bit of both". March 21, 2000
  15. ^ Virgin Media: "Peter Andre interview by Alex Robertson"
  16. ^ The New York Observer: "Coffee Tea: An Interview". October 1, 2006.
  17. ^ Michael Taylor (8 October 2010). "Starbucks Takes on Hong Kong Tastes (Part 2)". accidentaltravelwriter.net. Retrieved 29 October 2012.
  18. ^ Starbucks Hong Kong: "Escape This Summer With a Taste of Home" September 16, 2010
  19. ^ Lew, Josh. "Coffee or tea? With this drink, you get both". mnn.com. Narrative Content Group. Retrieved 24 August 2019.

External links[edit]

Media related to Yuenyeung (drink) at Wikimedia Commons