Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams

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Christian Democratic and Flemish
Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams
Leader Wouter Beke
Founded 1869 (Catholic Party)
1945 (PSC-CVP)
1968 (CVP)
2001 (CD&V)
Headquarters Wetstraat 89
1040 Brussels
Ideology Christian democracy[1]
Political position Centre-right
International affiliation Centrist Democrat International
European affiliation European People's Party
European Parliament group European People's Party
French-speaking counterpart Humanist Democratic Centre
Colours Orange
Former names Christian People's Party
(Dutch: Christelijke Volkspartij)
Chamber of Representatives
(Flemish seats)
18 / 87
Senate
(Flemish seats)
8 / 35
Flemish Parliament
27 / 124
Brussels Parliament
(Flemish seats)
2 / 17
European Parliament
(Flemish seats)
2 / 12
Flemish Provincial Councils
82 / 351
Website
www.cdenv.be
Politics of Belgium
Political parties
Elections

Christian Democratic and Flemish (Dutch: Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams About this sound listen , CD&V) is a Christian democratic[2][3] Flemish political party in Belgium. The Party historic has ties to both trade unionism (ACV) and trade associations (UNIZO) and the Farmer's League. Until 2001, the party was named the Christian People's Party (Christelijke Volkspartij, CVP).

CD&V is currently the largest party in the Flemish Parliament and is leading the Flemish Government which is led by Minister-president Kris Peeters. CD&V is also the largest Flemish party in the federal Di Rupo Government.

Herman Van Rompuy, the current president of the European Council, is one of the leading politicians of CD&V.

History[edit]

The history of the CD&V dates back to the 19th century. It originated in the 19th century catholic party, or 'Parti conservateur' (Conservative Party). At the end of the century, the new fraction of the so-called Christian democrats shifted the focus of the party slightly to the left. In the interwar years the party was renamed Catholic Bloc. Then, the Christian Social Party (PSC-CVP) existed from 1945 until 1968. In 1968, the PSC-CVP was split into to the French-speaking Christian Social Party (PSC, now Humanist Democratic Centre, cdH) and Flemish Christian People's Party (CVP).[4][5] In 2001 the CVP changed its name to the CD&V.

The party was almost continually in power from its establishment until 1999, with the exception of 1954-1958. In 1999, the Flemish Liberals and Democrats (VLD) became the largest party in Belgium, and formed a majority purple government of liberals, social democrats and greens. The same happened in the Flemish Government, but with the addition of Flemish nationalists. In 2003 CD&V again lost the federal elections which continuated the federal center-left coalition, but this time without the Greens.

In 2004, Flemish elections were held and the CD&V once more became the largest political party by representation in the Flemish Parliament. Yves Leterme became Flemish minister-president. After successful local elections in 2006, the party became the largest party in the Belgian Chambre of Representatives after the federal elections of 2007. The CD&V led the subsequent coalition talks, which repeatedly stalled (see 2007–2008 Belgian government formation). On the 20 March 2008, a new federal government was finally assembled, led by Yves Leterme. Kris Peeters subsequently became the next minister-president of Flanders. From 30 December 2008 till 25 November 2009, Herman Van Rompuy led his first cabinet before becoming the first permanent president of the European Council. Afterwards, Yves Leterme led his second government.

In June 2009, Flemish elections were held and the CD&V remained the largest party of Flanders. Kris Peeters stayed as Flemish minister-president. The party also remained the largest Flemish party in the European Parliament after the 2009 European elections.

In 2010, the Open Flemish Liberals and Democrats (Open VLD) decided to step out of the federal coalition and consequently ending the government. The federal elections of 2010 resulted in a major loss of historic proportions for CD&V, largely due to votes lost to the Flemish-nationalist New Flemish Alliance. In the campaign, former prime minister Yves Leterme took a subtle step aside as frontrunner of the party. The president of the party, Marianne Thyssen, had pre-electorally stated that she was a candidate to become Prime Minister.

On 6 December 2011, the Di Rupo Government was formed, with the CD&V as the largest Flemish party.

During the local elections in 2012, CD&V managed to remain the largest Flemish party on the local level. It remained in the coalition of all five Flemish provinces and in three quarters of the municipalities. Almost half of these municipalities were subsequently led by CD&V mayors.

Electoral results (1971–2010)[edit]

Federal Parliament[edit]

The main six Flemish political parties and their results for the Chamber of Representatives. From 1978 to 2014, in percentages for the complete 'Kingdom'.

Results for the Chamber of Representatives, in percentages for the Kingdom of Belgium. From 1971 tot 1999: CVP figures. 2003: CD&V figures. 2007: CD&V/N-VA figures. From 2010 onwards: CD&V figures.

Belgian general election, 2014 Belgian general election, 2010 Belgian general election, 2007 Belgian general election, 2003 Belgian general election, 1999 Belgian general election, 1995 Belgian general election, 1991 Belgian general election, 1987 Belgian general election, 1985 Belgian general election, 1981 Belgian general election, 1978 Belgian general election, 1977 Belgian general election, 1974 Belgian general election, 1971

Chamber of Representatives

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won # of language
group seats won
+/- Government Notes
1995 1,042,933 17.2
29 / 150
in coalition
1999 875,967 14.1
22 / 150
Decrease 7 in opposition
2003 870,749 13.3
21 / 150
21 / 88
Decrease 1 in opposition
2007 1,234,950 18.5 (#1)
25 / 150
25 / 88
Increase 4 in coalition In cartel with N-VA; 30 seats won by CD&V/N-VA
2010 707,986 10.9
17 / 150
17 / 88
Decrease 8 in coalition
2014 783,060 11.6
18 / 150
18 / 88
Increase 1 in coalition


Senate

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won # of language
group seats won
+/- Notes
1995 1,009,656 16.8 26.9 (#1)
7 / 40
7 / 25
1999 913,508 14.7 23.6 (#2)
6 / 40
6 / 25
Decrease 1
2003 832,849 12.7 20.4 (#3)
6 / 40
6 / 25
Steady 0
2007 1,287,389 19.4 31.4 (#1)
8 / 40
8 / 25
Increase 2 In cartel with N-VA; 9 seats won by CD&V/N-VA
2010 646,375 10.0 16.2 (#2)
4 / 40
4 / 25
Decrease 4 Last direct election

Regional parliaments[edit]

Brussels Parliament[edit]

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won # of language
group seats won
+/-
1989 18,523 4.2 (#6)
4 / 75
1995 13,586 3.3 (#6)
3 / 75
Decrease 1
1999 14,284 3.4 23.6 (#2)
3 / 75
Steady 0
2004 10,482 2.3 16.8 (#4)
3 / 89
3 / 17
Steady 0
In cartel with N-VA; 3 seats won by CD&V/N-VA
2009 7,696 1.7 14.9 (#4)
3 / 89
3 / 17
Steady 0
2014 6105 1.3 11.4 (#5)
2 / 89
2 / 17
Decrease 1

Flemish Parliament[edit]

Election year # of
overall votes
 % of
overall vote
 % of language
group vote
# of
overall seats won
# of language
group seats won
+/– Government
1995 1,010,505 26.8 (#1)
37 / 124
in coalition
1999 857,732 22.1 (#1)
30 / 124
Decrease 7 in opposition
2004 1,060,580 26.1 (#1)
29 / 124
Decrease 1 in coalition
In cartel with N-VA; 35 seats won by CD&V/N-VA
2009 939,873 22.9 (#1)
31 / 124
Increase 2 in coalition
2014 860,694 20.5 (#2)
27 / 124
Decrease 4 in coalition

European Parliament[edit]

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of electoral
college vote
# of overall seats won # of electoral
college won
+/- Notes
1979 1,607,941 48.1 (#1)
7 / 24
7 / 13
1984 1,132,682 32.5 (#1)
4 / 24
4 / 13
Decrease 3
1989 1,247,075 34.1 (#1)
5 / 24
5 / 13
Increase 1
1994 1,013,266 27.4 (#1)
4 / 25
4 / 14
Decrease 1
1999 839,720 21.7 (#2)
3 / 25
3 / 14
Decrease 1
2004 1,131,119 28.2 (#1)
3 / 24
3 / 14
Steady 0 In cartel with N-VA; 4 seats won by CD&V/N-VA
2009 948,123 23.3 (#1)
3 / 22
3 / 13
Steady 0
2014 840,814 20.0 (#3)
2 / 22
2 / 13
Decrease 1

Presidents[edit]

CVP/PSC

CVP

CD&V

Until 1968 this lists gives the president of the Flemish part of the unitary CVP/PSC. The party changed its name from CVP to CD&V on 29 September 2001.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Parties and Elections in Europe: The database about parliamentary elections and political parties in Europe, by Wolfram Nordsieck
  2. ^ Ari-Veikko Anttiroiko; Matti Mälkiä (2007). Encyclopedia of Digital Government. Idea Group Inc (IGI). pp. 397–. ISBN 978-1-59140-790-4. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Jeff Haynes; Anja Hennig (3 July 2013). Religious Actors in the Public Sphere: Means, Objectives, and Effects. Routledge. pp. 17–. ISBN 978-1-136-66171-6. 
  4. ^ Emiel Lamberts (1 January 1997). Christian Democracy in the European Union, 1945/1995: Proceedings of the Leuven Colloquium, 15-18 November 1995. Leuven University Press. pp. 65–. ISBN 978-90-6186-808-8. Retrieved 2 August 2013. 
  5. ^ Daniele Caramani (29 March 2004). The Nationalization of Politics: The Formation of National Electorates and Party Systems in Western Europe. Cambridge University Press. pp. 308–. ISBN 978-0-521-53520-5. Retrieved 2 August 2013. 

References[edit]

  • Th. Luykx and M. Platel, Politieke geschiedenis van België, 2 vol., Kluwer, 1985
  • W. Dewachter, Tussen staat en maatschappij, 1945-1995, christendemocratie in België, Tielt, 1995.
  • E. Witte, J. Craeybeckx en A. Meynen, Politieke geschiedenis van België, Standaard, 1997

Further reading[edit]

  • Beke, Wouter (2004). Steven Van Hecke; Emmanuel Gerard, eds. Living Apart Together: Christian Democracy in Belgium. Christian Democratic Parties in Europe Since the End of the Cold War (Leuven University Press). pp. 133–158. ISBN 90-5867-377-4. 
  • Lamberts, Emiel (2004). Michael Gehler; Wolfram Kaiser, eds. The Zenith of Christian Democracy: The Christelijke Volkspartij/Parti Social Chrétien in Belgium. Christian Democracy in Europe since 1945 (Routledge). pp. 59–73. ISBN 0-7146-5662-3. 

External links[edit]