Millville, New Jersey

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Millville, New Jersey
City
City of Millville
High Street in downtown Millville in 2006
High Street in downtown Millville in 2006
Millville highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Millville highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Millville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Millville, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°23′24″N 75°03′17″W / 39.390094°N 75.054797°W / 39.390094; -75.054797Coordinates: 39°23′24″N 75°03′17″W / 39.390094°N 75.054797°W / 39.390094; -75.054797[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Cumberland
Incorporated February 24, 1801 (as Township)
Reincorporated March 1, 1866 (as City)
Government[4]
 • Type Walsh Act
 • Mayor Michael Santiago
 • Clerk Susan G. Robostello[3]
Area[2]
 • Total 44.489 sq mi (115.228 km2)
 • Land 42.001 sq mi (108.783 km2)
 • Water 2.488 sq mi (6.445 km2)  5.59%
Area rank 43rd of 566 in state
4th of 14 in county[2]
Elevation[5] 43 ft (13 m)
Population (2010 Census)[6][7][8]
 • Total 28,400
 • Estimate (2012[9]) 28,619
 • Rank 78th of 566 in state
2nd of 14 in county[10]
 • Density 676.2/sq mi (261.1/km2)
 • Density rank 416th of 566 in state
3rd of 14 in county[10]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08332[11]
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3401146680[12][2][13]
GNIS feature ID 0885304[14][2]
Website http://www.ci.millville.nj.us
The Maurice River in Millville in 2006

Millville is a city in Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 28,400,[6][7][8] reflecting an increase of 1,553 (+5.8%) from the 26,847 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 855 (+3.3%) from the 25,992 counted in the 1990 Census.[15] Millville, Bridgeton and Vineland are the three principal New Jersey cities of the Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area which encompasses those cities and all of Cumberland County for statistical purposes.[16]

Millville was originally incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 24, 1801, from portions of Fairfield Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Landis Township on March 7, 1864. Millville was reincorporated as a city on March 1, 1866, based on the results of a referendum passed that same day.[17]

Millville has gained national recognition as the hometown of baseball all-star Mike Trout.

Geography and climate[edit]

Millville is located at 39°23′24″N 75°03′17″W / 39.390094°N 75.054797°W / 39.390094; -75.054797 (39.390094,-75.054797). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 44.489 square miles (115.228 km2), of which 42.001 square miles (108.783 km2) is land and 2.488 square miles (6.445 km2) (5.59%) is water.[1][2]

The city borders Deerfield Township, Fairfield Township, Lawrence Township, Downe Township, Commercial Township, Maurice River Township, and Vineland.

Millville lies between the southern termini of the New Jersey Turnpike, the Garden State Parkway, Route 55 (which runs through the northeastern portion of the city) and the Atlantic City Expressway.

Climate data for Millville, NJ (1981−2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 42
(6)
45
(7)
53
(12)
63
(17)
73
(23)
82
(28)
86
(30)
84
(29)
78
(26)
67
(19)
57
(14)
46
(8)
64.7
(18.3)
Average low °F (°C) 24
(−4)
25
(−4)
32
(0)
41
(5)
51
(11)
61
(16)
66
(19)
65
(18)
57
(14)
45
(7)
36
(2)
28
(−2)
44.3
(6.8)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.05
(77.5)
2.78
(70.6)
4.09
(103.9)
3.76
(95.5)
3.60
(91.4)
3.13
(79.5)
3.69
(93.7)
4.03
(102.4)
3.16
(80.3)
3.35
(85.1)
3.36
(85.3)
3.52
(89.4)
41.52
(1,054.6)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 8.9 9.1 10.5 11.1 10.0 9.1 9.0 8.1 7.9 8.1 8.8 9.4 110
Source: NOAA [18]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,032
1820 1,010 −2.1%
1830 1,559 54.4%
1840 1,771 13.6%
1850 2,332 31.7%
1860 3,932 68.6%
1870 6,101 * 55.2%
1880 7,660 25.6%
1890 10,002 30.6%
1900 10,583 5.8%
1910 12,451 17.7%
1920 14,691 18.0%
1930 14,705 0.1%
1940 14,806 0.7%
1950 16,041 8.3%
1960 19,096 19.0%
1970 21,366 11.9%
1980 24,815 16.1%
1990 25,992 4.7%
2000 26,847 3.3%
2010 28,400 5.8%
Est. 2012 28,619 [9] 0.8%
Population sources:
1810-2000[19] 1810-1920[20]
1840[21] 1850-1890[22] 1850-1870[23]
1850[24] 1870[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1870-1930[28]
1900-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[6][7][8]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[17]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 28,400 people, 10,648 households, and 7,187 families residing in the city. The population density was 676.2 per square mile (261.1 /km2). There were 11,435 housing units at an average density of 272.3 per square mile (105.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 69.04% (19,608) White, 19.83% (5,631) Black or African American, 0.94% (266) Native American, 1.19% (338) Asian, 0.06% (18) Pacific Islander, 5.24% (1,488) from other races, and 3.70% (1,051) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 14.93% (4,239) of the population.[6]

There were 10,648 households, of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.2% were married couples living together, 20.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.5% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.19.[6]

In the city, 25.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.6 years. For every 100 females there were 90.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.7 males.[6]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $44,925 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,459) and the median family income was $55,000 (+/- $4,433). Males had a median income of $46,186 (+/- $3,934) versus $35,336 (+/- $2,860) for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,364 (+/- $1,573). About 16.2% of families and 19.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.2% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census,[12] there were 26,847 people, 10,043 households, and 7,010 families residing in the city. The population density was 633.9 people per square mile (244.8/km2). There were 10,652 housing units at an average density of 251.5 per square mile (97.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 76.13% White, 14.99% African American, 0.52% Native American, 0.80% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 5.16% from other races, and 2.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.17% of the population.[30][31]

There were 10,043 households out of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.65 and the average family size was 2.15.[30][31]

In the city the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 89.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the city was $40,378, and the median income for a family was $46,093. Males had a median income of $36,915 versus $26,669 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,632. About 12.1% of families and 15.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.8% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Millville has a Ukrainian community and is home to Sts. Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church[33] and St Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Church[34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

In 1801, Millville was first organized as a township; It became a city in 1866. Until 1913, Millville operated under a Mayor-Council form of government where the mayor was elected by the people. In 1913, a change of form of government to the Walsh Act was passed and the commission form of government became the way the city was run.[35] Under this form of government as used in Millville, five commissioners are elected and one of these is selected from among its members to serve as the mayor.[4][36]

As of 2013, the Millville City Commission consists of Mayor J. Tim Shannon, Commissioner of Parks and Public Property; Vice-Mayor Joseph J. Derella, Jr., Commissioner of Revenue and Finance; Dale Finch, Commissioner of Public Works; James F. Quinn, Commissioner of Public Affairs; and David W. Vanaman, Commissioner of Public Safety.[37]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 17,500 registered voters in Millville, of which 4,652 (26.6%) were registered as Democrats, 2,802 (16.0%) were registered as Republicans and 10,033 (57.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 13 voters registered to other parties.[38]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 57.6% of the vote here (6,523 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received 39.8% (4,515 votes), with 11,330 ballots cast among the city's 17,715 registered voters, for a turnout of 64.0%.[39] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 50.9% of the vote here (5,082 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 46.8% (4,677 votes), with 9,992 ballots cast among the city's 15,685 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 63.7.[40]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 48.4% of the vote here (3,169 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 40.9% (2,675 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 6.9% (453 votes), with 6,541 ballots cast among the city's 17,167 registered voters, yielding a 38.1% turnout.[41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Millville is located in the 2nd Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 1st state legislative district.[7][43][44]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[48][49]

The 1st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township) and in the General Assembly by Bob Andrzejczak (D, Middle Township) and Sam Fiocchi (R, Vineland).[50] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[51] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[52]

Cumberland County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large in partisan elections to serve staggered three-year terms in office, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as Freeholder Director and another as Deputy Director.[53][54] As of 2013, Cumberland County's Freeholders (with committee chairmanship, political party, residence and term-end dates listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director William Whelan (Public Safety; D, Bridgeton, term ends December 31, 2014).[55] Freeholder Deputy Director Douglas M. Long (NA; D, Upper Deerfield Township, 2015),[56] Joseph Derella (NA; D, Millville, 2015),[56] Samuel L. Fiocchi, Sr. (Public Property & Personnel; R, Vineland, 2013),[57] Carl W. Kirstein (NA; R, Bridgeton, 2013),[58] Carol Musso (Health; D, Deerfield Township, 2014),[59] Tony Surace (Public Works; D, Millville, 2014),[60][61][56] The county's constitutional officers are County Clerk Gloria Noto (Vineland, 2014),[62] Sheriff Robert A. Austino (Vineland, 2014)[63] and Surrogate Douglas M. Rainear (Bridgeton, 2013).[64]

Education[edit]

Millville Public Schools serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. The district is one of 31 Abbott districts statewide,[65] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[66][67]

Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[68]) are Child Family Center[69] (622 students) for preschool, six K-5 elementary schools — Bacon Elementary School[70] (330), Holly Heights Elementary School[71] (534), Mt. Pleasant Elementary School[72] (249), Rieck Avenue Elementary School[73] (477), Silver Run Elementary School[74] (572) and Wood Elementary School[75] (274) — Lakeside Middle School[76] for grades 6-8 (1,109), Memorial High School[77] for grades 9 and half of 10th (740) and Millville Senior High School[78] for grades 11, 12, and the other half of the 10th grade (1,114). Millville Senior High Alternative School also serves students in grades 9-12.[79]

The district has high school sending/receiving relationships with Commercial Township, Lawrence Township, Maurice River Township and Woodbine.[80]

St. Mary Magdalen School is a Catholic school serving children in grades K-8 operating under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.[81] The school opened in 1882 with an enrollment of 45 students.[82] Former Camden Bishop Joseph Galante announced in January 2012 that the school would close in June due to poor finances resulting from a declining student body.[83]

Commerce[edit]

Portions of Millville are part of an Urban Enterprise Zone. In addition to other benefits to encourage employment within the Zone, shoppers can take advantage of a reduced 3½% sales tax rate (versus the 7% rate charged statewide) at eligible merchants.[84]

History[edit]

Wheaton Glass Works, November 1909. Photographed by Lewis Hine.

Known as "Shingle Landing" in its earliest days, a sawmill was believed to have existed at Leaming's Mill at around 1720.[85] The area also had a public road, a boat landing, and a bridge-like structure.

In 1790, Joseph Smith and Henry Drinker purchased 24,000 acres (97 km2) of land known as the Union Mills Tract. They also formed the Union Estates Company and built lumber mills along the Maurice River and established a dam to power these new mills. Joseph Buck, an American Revolutionary War veteran who served under General George Washington, was part of a group that purchased the land in the area and laid out the plans for what would become Millville.[86]

In 1806, an Irish immigrant, James Lee, opened the area's first glass factory, making use of the large amounts of silica sand and the ample wood that could be used to operate the plant.[87]

In the early 1850s, the Smith and Wood Iron Foundry and New Jersey Mills were constructed. In 1860, a bleachery and dye house were added to New Jersey Mills, which then became Millville Manufacturing. David Wood then constructed a dam, forming the largest man-made lake in the state, which powered the entire manufacturing organization. By 1870, the mill had 600 employees, and in 40 years this number doubled.

In 1862, Charles K. Landis laid out the city of Vineland about two and a half miles east of the Maurice River. In 1864, Vineland was separated from Millville Township and joined the new Landis Township.[17]

The Millville Airport was dedicated "America's First Defense Airport" on August 2, 1941, by local, state, and federal officials.[88] In less than a year, construction of military base facilities began, and in January 1943, the Millville Army Air Field opened as a gunnery school for fighter pilots. Gunnery training began with Curtiss P-40 Warhawk aircraft, but after a few weeks was changed over to the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. During its three-year existence, thousands of soldiers and civilians served here, with about 1,500 pilots receiving advanced fighter training in the Thunderbolt.[89]

Following World War II, the airfield was declared excess to the governments needs, and returned to the City of Millville. Most of the airport buildings were converted to apartments for the many veterans returning from the war. The last of the apartments vanished in the early 1970s, and the airport soon became a hub of industry and aviation for Southern New Jersey.[90]

Up to the late 1990s the Millville downtown area was depressed and somewhat isolated, examples including the abandoned Levoy Theatre and Wheaton Glass Factory, with investors reluctant to venture in its development. Major redevelopment has occurred in the past several years; establishing the scenic Riverfront and Downtown areas into an artists' haven including many studios, shops and restaurants. Older abandoned buildings have been restored with continued major development is planned.

Today Millville has an arts district named the Glasstown Arts District. A public art center with galleries and studios is the hub of activity, and is open six days a week. Seven full-time galleries and ten part-time galleries and studios are open mostly on weekends and on the third Friday of each month. WheatonArts and the Creative Glass Center of America includes a major collection of early American glass with contemporary glass from CGCA Fellows and working glass artists in a restored 19th century glass factory. The Levoy Theatre successfully re-opened on September 9, 2012

Transportation[edit]

Route 47, Route 49 and Route 55 all pass through the city.

Millville Municipal Airport, operated by the Delaware River and Bay Authority, serves general aviation.[91]

NJ Transit has several bus routes that service the Millville region.

Attractions[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Millville include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ Municipal Clerk, City of Millville. Accessed September 24, 2012.
  4. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 8.
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Millville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Millville city, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 15, 2011.
  7. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Millville city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 18, 2012.
  9. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  10. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 24, 2012.
  11. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Millville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 18, 2012.
  12. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed May 18, 2012.
  14. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 7, 2012.
  16. ^ Community Profile: Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton, NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. Accessed May 21, 2012.
  17. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 121. Accessed May 18, 2012.
  18. ^ "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-02-13. 
  19. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Cumberland County Municipalities, 1810 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed September 24, 2012. Data for years from 1810 to 1860 are for Millville Township.
  20. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  21. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 232, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 28, 2013.
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  23. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 270, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 28, 2013. "Millville is divided into three wards. Its population in 1850 was 2,332; in 1860, 3,932; and in 1870, 6,101. There are several large glass manufactories here."
  24. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 138. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 28, 2013.
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  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Millville city, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2012.
  33. ^ Orthodox Christian Churches of New Jersey - Cumberland County
  34. ^ Catholic Churches in Millville, NJ
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  44. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  47. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  48. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  50. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 14, 2014.
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  52. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ What is a County Freeholder?, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Freeholders are elected at-large and serve three year staggered terms. Each January, the Board reorganizes and selects its leadership."
  54. ^ About Cumberland County Government, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013. "By law, Cumberland County is allowed 7 freeholders, who serve staggered, overlapping three year terms. Two are elected in two successive years, three in the third year, elected from the county at-large. A Director of the Board is selected by his colleagues for a one year term."
  55. ^ William Whelan, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ a b c Kent, Spencer. "Democrats take back control of Cumberland County freeholder board; Whelan named director", South Jersey Times, January 3, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2012. "Doug Long and Joe Derella, both swept into office in November, were officially sworn in as board members, giving Democrats a 5 to 2 majority.... Democrat Bill Whelan was named director. Long was chosen as deputy board director."
  57. ^ Samuel L. Fiocchi, Sr., Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ Carl W. Kirstein, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ Carol Musso, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  60. ^ Tony Surace, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
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  66. ^ What are SDA Districts?, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 14, 2012. "SDA Districts are 31 special-needs school districts throughout New Jersey. They were formerly known as Abbott Districts, based on the Abbott v. Burke case in which the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the State must provide 100 percent funding for all school renovation and construction projects in special-needs school districts.... The districts were renamed after the elimination of the Abbott designation through passage of the state’s new School Funding Formula in January 2008."
  67. ^ SDA Districts, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 14, 2012.
  68. ^ Data for the Millville Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 24, 2012.
  69. ^ Child Family Center, Millville Public Schools. Accessed May 21, 2012.
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