Washington County, Maryland

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Washington County, Maryland
Burnsidebridge.jpg
Burnside's Bridge in Washington County, site of heavy combat during the Battle of Antietam
Seal of Washington County, Maryland
Seal
Map of Maryland highlighting Washington County
Location in the state of Maryland
Map of the United States highlighting Maryland
Maryland's location in the U.S.
Founded 1776
Named for George Washington
Seat Hagerstown
Largest city Hagerstown
Area
 • Total 467.55 sq mi (1,211 km2)
 • Land 458.14 sq mi (1,187 km2)
 • Water 9.41 sq mi (24 km2), 2.01%
Population
 • (2010) 147,430
 • Density 322/sq mi (124.2/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.washco-md.net

Washington County is a county located in the western part of the US state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census, the population was 147,430.[1] Its county seat is Hagerstown.[2] Washington County was the first county in the United States to be named for the Revolutionary War general (and later President) George Washington.

The county borders southern Pennsylvania to the north, northern Virginia to the south, and the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia to the south and west.

Washington County is one of three counties in the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. Washington County has experienced a population boom, and is one of the fastest growing counties in the country, due to an influx of people from the Washington–Baltimore metropolitan areas.

History[edit]

The western portions of Maryland (including present Washington County) were incorporated into Prince George's County in 1696. This original county included six current counties. The first to be created was Frederick, separated from Prince George's County in 1748.

Washington County was formed on September 6, 1776 by the division of Frederick County. At the same time, Montgomery County was also separated from Frederick County and was named for General Richard Montgomery. Washington County as created included land later to become Allegany County (created in 1789) and Garrett County (included in Allegany County when it was created in 1789, but separated from Allegany County in 1872). Washington County thus originally included the entire western part of the state.[3]

A number of properties in the county are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[4]

Geography[edit]

Washington County is located in the Appalachian Mountains, stretching from the Ridge-and-Valley Country in the west to South Mountain in the east, which is an extension of the Blue Ridge. Much of the county lies in the broad Hagerstown Valley between these two zones; the valley is part of the Great Appalachian Valley that continues southward into Virginia and West Virginia as the Shenandoah Valley and northward into Pennsylvania as the Cumberland Valley.

The county is bordered to the north by the Mason-Dixon Line with Pennsylvania, to the south by the Potomac River and the states of Virginia and West Virginia, to the west by Sideling Hill Creek and Allegany County, Maryland, and to the east by Frederick County and South Mountain.

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 467.55 square miles (1,210.9 km2), of which 458.14 square miles (1,186.6 km2) (or 97.99%) is land and 9.41 square miles (24.4 km2) (or 2.01%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Highways[edit]

Law and government[edit]

County government[edit]

Washington County's 'leader' is known as the County Administrator. Currently, Greg Murray serves as the Administrator. However, Washington County's County Commissioners exercise executive powers as they exist in the government of the county.

The County Commissioners in Washington County comprise the traditional form of county government in Maryland. Current members include: Terry Baker, President, John F. Barr, Vice-President and Ruth Anne Callaham, Jeff Cline and William B. McKinley.

State representation[edit]

Washington County is represented by two senators in the Maryland State Senate. Member Christopher B. Shank (R), serves the 2nd district in Maryland and Ronald N. Young (D), serves in the 3rd district. The county also is represented in Maryland General Assembly's other primary division, the Maryland House of Delegates. Delegates who stand for Washington County include: LeRoy Myers (R) for District 1C, Andrew A. Serafini (R) for District 2A, Neil Parrot (R) for District 2B, John P. Donoghue (D) for District 2C, and Michael Hough (R) for District 3B.

Federal representation[edit]

The county is located within Maryland's 6th congressional district. The representative of the district currently is John Delaney (D).

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 15,822
1800 18,650 17.9%
1810 18,730 0.4%
1820 23,075 23.2%
1830 25,268 9.5%
1840 28,850 14.2%
1850 30,848 6.9%
1860 31,417 1.8%
1870 34,712 10.5%
1880 38,561 11.1%
1890 39,782 3.2%
1900 45,133 13.5%
1910 49,617 9.9%
1920 59,694 20.3%
1930 65,882 10.4%
1940 68,838 4.5%
1950 78,886 14.6%
1960 91,219 15.6%
1970 103,829 13.8%
1980 113,086 8.9%
1990 121,393 7.3%
2000 131,923 8.7%
2010 147,430 11.8%
Est. 2012 149,180 1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
2012 Estimate[7]

2010[edit]

Whereas according to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau:

2000[edit]

As of the census of 2010, there were 147,430 people, 49,726 households, and 34,112 families residing in the county. The population density was 315 people per square mile (111/km²). There were 52,972 housing units at an average density of 116 per square mile (45/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 89.71% White or Caucasian, 7.77% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.80% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 1.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. In the Census 2000, 32.1% identified as being of German ancestry, 21.4% American, 8.8% Irish, and 8.4% English ancestry.

There were 49,726 households out of which 31.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.00% were married couples living together, 10.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.40% were non-families. 26.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.40% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 104.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,617, and the median income for a family was $48,962. Males had a median income of $34,917 versus $24,524 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,062. About 7.00% of families and 9.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.30% of those under age 18 and 9.50% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Boonsboro
Hagerstown
Hancock
Sharpsburg
Williamsport

Washington County contains the following incorporated municipalities:

Unincorporated areas are also considered as towns by many people and listed in many collections of towns, but they lack local government. Various organizations, such as the United States Census Bureau, the United States Postal Service, and local chambers of commerce, define the communities they wish to recognize differently, and since they are not incorporated, their boundaries have no official status outside the organizations in question. The Census Bureau recognizes the following census-designated places in the county:

  1. Cavetown
  2. Chewsville
  3. Fort Ritchie
  4. Fountainhead-Orchard Hills (a combination of the communities of Fountainhead and Orchard Hills recognized as a unit by the Census Bureau)
  5. Halfway
  6. Highfield-Cascade (a combination of the communities of Highfield and Cascade recognized as a unit by the Census Bureau)
  7. Leitersburg
  8. Maugansville
  9. Mount Aetna
  10. Mount Lena
  11. Paramount-Long Meadow (a combination of the communities of Paramount and Long Meadow recognized as a unit by the Census Bureau)
  12. Robinwood
  13. Rohrersville
  14. Saint James
  15. San Mar
  16. Wilson-Conococheague (a combination of the communities of Wilson and Conococheague recognized as a unit by the Census Bureau)

Other unincorporated areas not listed as CDP's include:

  1. Antietam
  2. Beaver Creek
  3. Benevola
  4. Big Pool
  5. Broadfording
  6. Brownsville
  7. Burtner
  8. Cearfoss
  9. Cedar Grove
  10. Dargan
  11. Downsville
  12. Eakles Mills
  13. Fairplay
  14. Fairview
  15. Gapland
  16. Huyett
  17. Indian Springs
  18. Jugtown
  19. Mapleville
  20. Mercersville
  21. Pecktonville
  22. Pen Mar
  23. Pinesburg
  24. Ringgold
  25. Samples Manor
  26. Sandy Hook
  27. Spielman
  28. Trego
  29. Van Lear
  30. Weverton
  31. Woodmont

Parks and recreation[edit]

Sideling Hill man-made mountain pass on I-68/U.S. 40 near Hancock

National parks[edit]

State parks[edit]

Other recreation[edit]

Education[edit]

Washington County Public Schools administers public schools in the county. See Washington County Public Schools – School Directory for a detailed listing of elementary, middle, high, and other schools.

High schools[edit]

Colleges and universities[edit]

  • University System of Maryland at Hagerstown, a branch of the University of Maryland offering various associate's, bachelor's, and master's degree programs in connection with other state colleges and universities in Maryland.

Notable residents and natives[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ [1], Washington County, Maryland History and Genealogy, 2006. Retrieved 2008.
  4. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-24. 
  5. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved February 13, 2011. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Census.gov. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Wikivoyage has a travel guide for Washington County (Maryland).

Coordinates: 39°36′N 77°49′W / 39.60°N 77.81°W / 39.60; -77.81