East Indies Station

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Commander-in-Chief, East Indies
HMS Swiftsure (1903) gunnery practice 1913.jpg
HMS Swiftsure at gunnery practice on the East Indies Station in the summer of 1913
Active 1865–1941
Country  United Kingdom
Branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Type Fleet
Part of Admiralty
Garrison/HQ Trincomalee

The Commander-in-Chief, East Indies was a British Royal Navy admiral and the formation subordinate to him from 1865 to 1941.[1] Even in official documents, the term East Indies Station was often used.

History[edit]

Navy House, Trincomalee, residence of the Commander-in-Chief, East Indies Station from 1811 to 1942

The East Indies Station was established as a Royal Navy command in 1744. From 1831–1865, the East Indies and the China Station were a single command known as the East Indies and China Station.[1] The East Indies Station, established in 1865, covered the Indian Ocean (excluding the waters around the Dutch East Indies, South Africa and Australia) and included the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea.[2] These responsibilities did not imply territorial claims but rather that the navy would actively protect British trading interests.

The East Indies Station had bases at Colombo, Trincomalee, Bombay, Basra and Aden. In response to increased Japanese threats, the separate East Indies Station was merged with the China Station in December 1941, to form the Eastern Fleet.[3]

In early May 1941, the Commander-in-Chief directed forces to support the pursuit of Pinguin, the German raider that eventually sank after the Action of 8 May 1941 against HMS Cornwall.

On 7 December 1941, cruisers on the station included the heavy cruisers Cornwall, Dorsetshire, and Exeter; the light cruisers Glasgow, Danae, Dauntless, Durban, Emerald and Enterprise (some sources also place the heavy cruiser Hawkins as being on station on that date, while others report her being under refit and repair in the UK between early November 1941 & May 1942), and six armed merchant cruisers. Also assigned to the station was 814 Naval Air Squadron at China Bay, Ceylon, which unit was at that time equipped with Fairey Swordfish torpedo bombers.[4][4][5]

Facilities[edit]

Commanders-in-Chief[edit]

Commanders-in-Chief have included:

Commander-in-Chief, East Indies:[7]

Commander-in-Chief, East Indies and China Station

Commander-in-Chief, East Indies & Cape of Good Hope Station[1]

Commander-in-Chief, East Indies Station[1][34]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Byron's appointment was initially a subterfuge, designed to provide apparent legitimacy for a voyage along the coast of Spanish South America and around the Cape of Good Hope. Byron's true mission was to establish a British naval presence on an uninhabited island off Spanish South America, which he achieved via landings on the Falkland Islands in December 1764.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d William Loney RN
  2. ^ Royal Navy foreign stations
  3. ^ The sinking of HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse
  4. ^ a b c "East Indies Fleet". Orders of Battle. 
  5. ^ Whitley, Mike J. (1995). Cruisers of World War Two: An International Encyclopedia (1st ed.). London: Arms and Armour Press. p. 80. ISBN 1-86019-874-0. 
  6. ^ Coad, Jonathan (2013). Support for the Fleet: architecture and engineering of the Royal Navy's bases 1700–1914. Swindon, Wilts.: English Heritage. 
  7. ^ Joseph Haydn, The Book of Dignities, Longman, Brown Green and Longmans, 1851, p. 272–273
  8. ^ J. K. Laughton, Barnett, Curtis (d. 1746), rev. Richard Harding, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  9. ^ J. K. Laughton, Griffin, Thomas (1692/3–1771), rev. Richard Harding, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  10. ^ Clive Wilkinson, Boscawen, Edward (1711–1761), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  11. ^ J. K. Laughton, Watson, Charles (1714–1757), rev. A. W. H. Pearsall, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  12. ^ Tom Pocock, Pocock, Sir George (1706–1792), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  13. ^ J. K. Laughton, Steevens, Charles (bap. 1705, d. 1761), rev. Richard Harding, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  14. ^ J. K. Laughton, Cornish, Sir Samuel, baronet (c. 1715–1770), rev. Nicholas Tracy, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  15. ^ a b Rea, Robert R. (October 1981). "Florida and the Royal Navy's Floridas". The Florida Historical Quarterly. Florida Historical Society. 60 (2): 187. 
  16. ^ J. K. Laughton, Lindsay, Sir John (1737–1788), rev. Clive Wilkinson, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Oct 2007, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  17. ^ J. K. Laughton, Harland, Sir Robert, first baronet (c.1715–1784), rev. Randolph Cock, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  18. ^ a b J. K. Laughton, Hughes, Sir Edward (c.1720–1794), rev. Roger Knight, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  19. ^ J. K. Laughton, Nicholas Tracy, Vernon, Sir Edward (1723–1794), rev. Nicholas Tracy, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  20. ^ J. K. Laughton, Parker, Sir Hyde, fifth baronet (1714–1782/3), rev. Alan G. Jamieson, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  21. ^ J. K. Laughton, Mitchell, Sir Andrew (1757–1806), rev. P. L. C. Webb, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  22. ^ Andrew Lambert, Cornwallis, Sir William (1744–1819), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  23. ^ Kenneth Breen, Rainier, Peter (1741–1808), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2011, accessed 17 Dec 2011.
  24. ^ C. H. H. Owen, Elphinstone, George Keith, Viscount Keith (1746–1823), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2009, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  25. ^ Christopher D. Hall, Pellew, Edward, first Viscount Exmouth (1757–1833), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2009, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  26. ^ P. K. Crimmin, Troubridge, Sir Thomas, first baronet (c.1758–1807), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2009, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  27. ^ J. K. Laughton, Hood, Sir Samuel, first baronet (1762–1814), rev. Michael Duffy, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2007, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  28. ^ a b The United Service Magazine, 1831, Part 2, page 222
  29. ^ J. K. Laughton, Andrew Lambert, King, Sir Richard, second baronet (1774–1834), rev. Andrew Lambert, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  30. ^ J. K. Laughton, Blackwood, Sir Henry, first baronet (1770–1832), rev. Andrew Lambert, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  31. ^ J. K. Laughton, Brisbane, Sir James (1774–1826), rev. Andrew Lambert, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2008, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  32. ^ J. K. Laughton, Roger Morriss, Gage, Sir William Hall (1777–1864), rev. Roger Morriss, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  33. ^ J. K. Laughton, Owen, Sir Edward Campbell Rich (1771–1849), rev. Andrew Lambert, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Sept 2010, accessed 18 Dec 2011.
  34. ^ Whitaker's Almanacks 1900–1941.
  35. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36763). London. 9 May 1902. p. 10. 

External links[edit]