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List of U.S. state beverages

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This is a list of state beverages as designated by the various states of the United States.[1] The first known usage of declaring a specific beverage a "state beverage" within the US began in 1965 with Ohio designating tomato juice as their official beverage. The most popular choice for state beverage designation is Milk (or a flavored milk) with 21 out of the 28 states (26 states and 2 territories with official beverages) making milk their official beverage, while Rhode Island chose coffee-flavored milk. Alabama and Virginia are the only two U.S. states to have alcoholic beverages as their state beverages.

Table[edit]

State Drink Year
Alabama Conecuh Ridge Whiskey
(State Spirit)
2004[2]
Arkansas Milk 1985[3]
Delaware Milk 1983[4]
Florida Orange juice 1967[5]
Kentucky Milk (State Drink) 2005[6]
Ale-8-One
(An original Kentucky soft drink)
2013[7]
Louisiana Milk 1983[8]
Maine Moxie 2005[9]
Maryland Milk 1998[10]
Massachusetts Cranberry juice 1970[11]
Minnesota Milk 2004[12]
Mississippi Milk 1984[13]
Nebraska Milk (State Beverage) 1998[14]
Kool-Aid (State Soft Drink)
New York Milk 1981[15][16][17][18]
North Carolina Milk 1987[19]
North Dakota Milk 1983[20]
Ohio Tomato juice 1965[21]
Oklahoma Milk 2002[22]
Oregon Milk 1997[23]
Pennsylvania Milk 1982[24]
Rhode Island Coffee milk 1993[25]
South Carolina Milk (State Beverage) 1984[26]
South Carolina-grown tea
(State Hospitality Beverage)
1995[26]
South Dakota Milk 1986[27]
Tennessee Milk 2009[28]
Vermont Milk 1983[29]
Virginia Milk 1982[30]
Rye Whiskey 2017[31]
Wisconsin Milk 1987[32]
D.C. & U.S. Territories Drink Year
District of Columbia Rickey 2011[33]
Puerto Rico Piña Colada 1978[34]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Official State Beverages, NetState.com, accessed April 21, 2006.
  2. ^ "State Spirit of Alabama", Alabama Emblems, Symbols and Honors, Alabama Department of Archives & History, 2005-08-25 .
  3. ^ "Arkansas State Symbols" (PDF), sos.arkansas.gov, Arkansas Secretary of State, retrieved 2017-04-01 .
  4. ^ "Delaware Miscellaneous Symbols", delaware.gov, Delaware, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  5. ^ McGovern, Bernie (2007). Florida Almanac 2007-2008. Pelican Publishing. p. 451. ISBN 978-1-58980-428-9. 
  6. ^ "Kentucky State Symbols". Kentucky Legislature. 2007-03-30. Retrieved 2014-03-26. 
  7. ^ "Kentucky State Original Kentucky Soft Drink". NetState. Retrieved 2017-10-01. 
  8. ^ "RS 49:170", legis.la.gov, Louisiana State Legislature, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  9. ^ "Title 1, Section 224", mainelegislature.org, Maine Legislature, retrieved 2017-05-02 .
  10. ^ "Maryland at a Glance", msa.maryland.gov, Maryland State Archives, 2016-03-06, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  11. ^ "Massachusetts Fun Facts", mass.gov, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  12. ^ "State Drink", mn.gov, Minnesota, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  13. ^ "State Symbols", ms.gov, Mississippi, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  14. ^ "Nebraska Symbols", snr.unl.edu, University of Nebraska, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  15. ^ New York State Law § 82, New York State Assembly .
  16. ^ New York State Symbols, New York State Secretary of State .
  17. ^ New York State Symbols, I Love New York government tourism marketing office .
  18. ^ Marc Butler (June 8, 2008), June Is the Time to Recognize New York's Dairy Industry, New York State Assembly .
  19. ^ "Official State Symbols of North Carolina". North Carolina State Library. State of North Carolina. 
  20. ^ "State Symbols (capital, bird, tree, flag...)", nd.gov, The State of North Dakota, 2011, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  21. ^ Fry, Stephen (2010). Stephen Fry in America: Fifty States and the Man Who Set Out to See Them All. HarperCollins. p. 160. ISBN 978-0-06-145638-1. 
  22. ^ Talley, Tim (November 2, 2002). "Milk becomes official state beverage". Amarillo Globe News. Archived from the original on 2011-06-28. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  23. ^ "State Symbols: Animal to Fish", bluebook.state.or.us, Oregon Blue Book, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  24. ^ Facts About the States, 1993, p.433, Joseph Nathan Kane, 973 F119A.
  25. ^ Rhode Island statutes - section 42-4-15
  26. ^ a b "1995-96 Bill 3487: State Hospitality Beverage, Tea - South Carolina Legislature Online". 1995-04-10. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  27. ^ "1-6-16", sdlegislature.gov, South Dakota Legislature, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  28. ^ "June Dairy Month Kicks Off in Tennessee". TN.gov. State of Tennessee. June 3, 2009. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  29. ^ [ Office of the Secretary of State, Vermont Legislative Directory and State Manual, Biennial Session, 1993-1994, p. 19.]
  30. ^ "Code of Virginia", law.lis.virginia.gov, Virginia Law, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  31. ^ "Virginia to honor George Washington’s Whiskey". WTOP. Associated Press. March 23, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2017. 
  32. ^ "Wisconsin's State Symbols", legis.wisconsin.gov, State Wisconsin Reference Bureau, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  33. ^ "Rickey Named Official D.C. Cocktail". dcist. Gothamist LLC. July 2011. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  34. ^ "Celebrate Two of Mankind's Greatest Inventions". Retrieved 2007-06-19. 

External links[edit]